All posts by Teresa Stockton

Isokinetic Devices

Isokinetic Devices for the 21st Century Therapist

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Isokinetic Devices

Isokinetic devices have had their time in the spotlight of the rehab world. Like an actor past his prime, these monstrous machines mostly sit in dark lonely corners collecting dust. Some get used regularly but only as a place for sitting and storing odds and ends. However, companies such as CSMi (Computer Sports Medicine Inc.) among others have revived this once proud and prominent piece of equipment and have applied modern technology and rehab principles to bring about a new golden age of isokinetic devices and rehab.

Historically, isokinetics was introduced in the late 1970s and hit it’s stride in the 1980s through the 90s. Various protocols were created in this time and have been researched extensively creating the body of knowledge we now have. Unfortunately, isokinetics lost favor as healthcare laws changed and the industry started the search for more low-cost treatment regimens.

ISOKINETIC DEVICES TESTING
There are now fewer therapists who know how to use the equipment and most that do are unaware of the improvements that have been made over the last twenty years. Historically, joints are measured at two or three varying speeds but only in the concentric mode of contraction. While this is still the gold standard of testing, it fails to assess the all important eccentric mode of contraction. Recently, CSMi introduced the interrupted stoke test on their machine, the Humac Norm, which allows the therapist to separate concentric and eccentric modes. Our muscles function as eccentric controllers of motion and the ability to test this provides us with a better view into the muscle’s strength and function.

There are other testing modes available as not all patients are appropriate for isokinetic testing. Isometric testing is something all therapists use daily in the form of manual muscle testing(MMT). However, this is not a precise measurement and can vary between therapists. Testing a patient isometrically on a machine is a safe, effective and precise test for your older, untrained and post-surgical patients. It provides an exact amount of torque as compared to the MMT 5-point system. Additionally, proprioception can be assessed for either velocity or joint position matching.

TREATMENT
In addition to testing, isokinetic devices offer various treatment modes are where these machines show their true capability. Continuous Passive Motion can be utilized for regaining range of motion, reducing swelling and pain, reducing apprehension and muscle guarding and regaining musculotendonous mobility.

Active Assisted Programs can be utilized to regain end-range motion and multi-angle isometrics can be utilized to increase joint stability and neuromuscular control within the entire available range of motion. Also, proprioception training can be utilized to enhance positional and motion control.

Strength training with eccentric loading allows for targeted strengthening by isolating the eccentric beginning in slower speeds and progressing into deceleration training to mimic plyometric loading.

Isotonic strengthening programs are available for various purposes. One is power training which is utilized to increase concentric explosiveness. Another is used to prepare patients for an independent gym program. Finally, dynamic isotonic control training includes the ability to load the concentric and eccentric motions at different torques and utilizes games and other programs as visual feedback to the patient.

ARGUMENTS AGAINST ISOKINETICS
One argument against isokinetics concerns patellofemoral, post-op ACL and knee osteoarthritis patients. Open chain knee extension has been labeled public enemy number one for these patients and while this has been examined extensively, steps such as limiting the range of motion, using anti-shear devices and techniques, altering patient positioning and matching the appropriate treatments to the patient reduces shearing and compression, improves safety and ultimately debunks this myth.

Now, I know that critics of isokinetics will also argue that isolating muscles is not functional. That would be true if a therapist utilized these machines as the sole treatment. But by incorporating it into an eclectic approach, patient outcomes are maximized. Your lower extremity patients will still perform scapular and thoracic control exercises and you will still strengthen the core. Soft tissue work and joint mobilization will still be needed and functional training must still occur. However, if one link in the chain is weak, the entire chain will fail. Utilizing these machines throughout the course of rehab to find and isolate those weak links is what will take your patient’s recovery of function to the next level. This is true for all of your extremity patients, nit just knees. Remember, a functional movement cannot occur with a dysfunctional or unbalanced segment.

This information was written by Daniel Bodkin, PT, DPT, ATC – STAR Physical Therapy, Columbia (North), Tennessee
Established in 1997 with one clinic and one mission – to serve. Today, STAR Physical Therapy has grown to offer that direct service in more than 60 clinics, and while they’ve grown, one thing that has not changed is their commitment to you, their communities, and their employees. Their foundational mission is “To Serve.” Their commitment to the patient and physician is to provide clinicians that are “great mechanics of the human body™.” For more information click here.

hand therapy week PTandMe

ASHT: Hand Therapy Awareness Week

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

hand therapy week PTandMe

Prevent hand and wrist injuries while cooking. Professional hand therapists promote wrist and hand health in the kitchen.

USE THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB
Use easy-to-grip versions of tools like spoons, knives and bottle/can openers to decrease the stress on your hands and use scissors to open bags (or packages) instead of your thumbs.

SIT OR STAND UP STRAIGHT
Correct posture is important because the nerves that operate your fingers start in neck. During activities which require you to be looking down at what you are doing, like chopping vegetables, take a moment to stand up straight, turn your head side to side/up and down, and stretch your arms over your head.

SLIDE, DO NOT LIFT
When working in the oven, always slide the shelf out so you can get a good, safe grasp of the panhandles.

KEEP YOUR SHOULDERS DOWN
Your arms should be at your sides and the counters you work on should be waist high. Many kitchen counters are too high for the average person. As a result, you may be forced to raise the shoulder you are using to cut the food and lean to the opposite side of your body when preparing food. This causes increased stress on the neck, shoulder and arm muscles and nerves.

TMJ Pain

Physical Therapy Helps With TMJ Pain

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

TMJ Pain

Physical Therapy can help those suffering with pain associated with the facial region, head, and/or neck, including those struggling with Temporomandibular (TMJ) disorders.

The temporomandibular joint or TMJ, is a complex joint located in front of each ear. It is responsible for allowing mouth opening and closing. When the TMJ is not working correctly, you may experience jaw pain, clicking, popping, or locking of the joint. You may also experience headaches, neck pain, sinus pain, dizziness, and ear ringing or pain. TMJ pain or Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD) is not strictly limited to the jaw, jaw, it can also be influenced by activities, positioning, or alignment of the head and neck.

COMMON CAUSES

  • Excessive grinding or clenching of teeth
  • Joint stiffness
  • TMJ Disorders
  • Poor Posture or Ergonomics
  • Other neck conditions including pain and headache
  • Stress and muscle tension

TMJ Pain

PHYSICAL THERAPY TREATMENT FOR TMJ
Physical therapy treatment includes an in depth evaluation of the structures of the cervical spine, jaw joints and head. Treatment could include manual therapy techniques for the spine, jaw and soft tissues, exercise for the jaw and neck, and modalities. Evaluation focuses on the relationship of the muscles, joints and nerves of the jaw, head, neck and face and how they relate to each other. Manual therapy may be used to improve range of motion and mobility of the jaw and neck. Exercise is designed to restore the proper balance of the spine and head to take unnecessary stress off of sensitive tissues and to support the body so it can perform the activities of daily living efficiently and comfortably. Modalities will decrease the short-term discomfort and joint irritation. We will look at how you interact with your environment to see if there are activates you preform that put increase stress on your body which could cause increased pain. Most importantly, in addition to these techniques, the patient is provided with a home exercise program to aid in symptom reduction. Each treatment plan is based on a patient’s individual needs and the therapist, patient, and referring practitioner work as a team to reach the patients goals.

This information was written by Rehab Associates of Central Virginia, an outpatient physical therapy group with 13 locations in Central Virginia. Their physical therapists have advanced degrees in specialty orthopedic care from head to toe. From musculoskeletal headaches to lower back pain to heel pain syndrome, they can help take away your pain and help you return to normal activity. For more information click here.

Healthy Recipes 101

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Healthy Recipes 101 features fit and lean recipes from online health resources!

LIGHTER SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS
Where we saved fat for this healthy recipe: stretched out the decadence of the beef by adding a Portobello mushroom and using an egg white; we added fiber by using whole-wheat spaghetti. Read More

Written by Food Network Kitchens

Chronic Disease Relief

Exercise for Chronic Disease Relief

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin


For people in need of chronic disease relief, exercise can decrease discomfort, improve daily functioning, and enhance overall quality of life. There are many activity choices. Overall, find something that you enjoy doing and a place that is comfortable for you to do it in. Although being physically active is good for anyone, some exercises provide specific benefits. Here is how different types of exercise can help people with specific chronic diseases.

CHRONIC DISEASE RELIEF : TYPES OF EXERCISE
There are 3 basic categories of exercise:

Aerobic Exercise
These are exercises that raise your heart rate through repetitive movement of large muscles groups. The 2 types of aerobic exercise are:

  • Weightbearing exercise —Your muscles work against the force of gravity. Examples include jogging, walking, and dancing.
  • Non-weightbearing exercise —The force of gravity does not play a major role. Examples include biking, swimming, and rowing.

Strength Training Exercise
These are exercises that increase the power, tone, and efficiency of individual muscles by contracting isolated muscles against resistance. An example is lifting weights. The increase in heart rate is short-lived compared to aerobic exercise.

Stretching

These are exercises that improve or maintain the flexibility of your muscles. Good flexibility is important to keeping a full range of motion and decreasing your chances of injury. Ideally, you should stretch after each exercise session.

DISEASE IMPACT
Overall, all 3 types of exercises are important in a chronic disease relief program. However, the list below demonstrates how a certain types of exercise can directly impact your specific health condition.

Heart Disease
Researchers and healthcare professionals have found that regular exercise reduces the risk of having a heart attack, particularly for people with coronary artery disease (CAD).

Specific benefits of exercise for people with heart disease include:

  • Stronger heart muscle
  • Reduced cholesterol
  • Reduced plaque build-up inside the arteries
  • Better weight and blood pressure control

Type of exercise that can reduce risk of heart disease and heart attack: Aerobic

High Cholesterol
Cholesterol is found in cells throughout your body. Although it tends to get a bad rap, cholesterol is actually essential for life. It only contributes to heart disease when you have too much of certain types of cholesterol or too little of other types.

Exercise can help reduce cholesterol, and even better, it can help raise your HDL (good) cholesterol. Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Even short, 10-minute spurts of exercise can help. Exercise also has the added benefit of weight loss, which can also help to lower cholesterol levels.

Type of exercise that has been shown to improve cholesterol levels: Aerobic

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of the body’s insulin production and usage, and it is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. If there is not enough insulin, glucose (fuel for all cells) cannot get from the blood to the cells. As a result, the body is essentially starved and the glucose builds up in the blood. Exercise can make the cells more sensitive to insulin, and more glucose can move from the blood into cells.

Since exercise changes the way your body reacts to insulin, you may need to check your blood sugar before and after exercising. Talk to your doctor before you begin an exercise program to learn about what your levels should be.

Types of exercise that influence insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk factors: Aerobic and strength training

High Blood Pressure
The risk of high blood pressure increases as we age. Exercise can help to lower your risk and even control your blood pressure if it’s already high. Exercise helps with blood pressure by making your heart work more efficiently. This means your heart does not have to work as hard to pump blood, so there is less pressure on your arteries.

A good target for blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. Adding moderate physical activities to your normal routines can help you get there. You should aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity on most days of the week. Even several 10-minute spurts throughout the day can help.

Types of exercise that have been shown to lower blood pressure: Aerobic and strength training

Stroke
A stroke occurs when not enough blood is reaching part of the brain. This causes the cells in that area to die. People who have already had a stroke are at increased risk for recurrent stroke or other cardiovascular problems.

A stroke can create some physical impairments. Exercise may improve strength and coordination of the affected muscles. Exercise recommendations may vary depending on the severity of the stroke and the person’s limitations.

Type of exercise for stroke recovery: Aerobic, strength training, and stretching

Cancer
Studies suggest that people with cancer who do not have depression have a better chance of survival than those who do. Exercise is a great way to avoid depression and improve your overall mood. It’s not clear exactly how exercise impacts mood, but it probably works by causing the brain to release chemicals, like endorphins, and increase body temperature, which can have a calming effect.

Types of exercise found to boost energy and mood: Aerobic and strength training

Lung Disease
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is the most common form of lung disease in adults. Exercise improves activity levels and decreases symptoms.

Types of exercise shown to improve respiratory ability: Aerobic

Arthritis

Continuous motion is essential for the health of your joints, especially arthritic ones. Regular exercise promotes strength and flexibility, and helps preserve the resiliency of joint surfaces.

Types of exercise shown to improve joint health: Nonweightbearing aerobic, strength training, and stretching (water exercises are ideal)

Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis is a bone-thinning disease that can lead to fractures. Weightbearing exercises maintain bone density and strength by tipping the balance in favor of bone formation. Weightbearing activities include walking, jogging, hiking, dancing, stair climbing, tennis, and other activities that you do while on your feet.

Type of exercise shown to improve bone density: Weightbearing aerobic and strength training

In any condition, a well-rounded exercise program will have all 3 types of exercise involved. Aerobic exercise will increase your endurance and ability to get through longer workouts. Strength training will build muscle strength and allow you to tolerate higher intensities as well improve balance and agility. Stretching can decrease stiffness and increase mobility.

Talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program. You can also consult with an exercise specialist to help you develop a routine.

by Carrie Myers Smith, BS

RESOURCES:
National Institutes of Health
http://www.nih.gov

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
http://www.aossm.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology
http://www.csep.ca

Healthy Canadians
http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca

REFERENCES:
Depression. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated February 11, 2016. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Exercises for arthritis. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/exercise/. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Fagard RH. Exercise characteristics and the blood pressure response to dynamic physical training. Med Sci Sports Exerc 33. S484-S492; 2001.

Gordon NF, Gulanick M, Costa F, Fletcher G, Franklin BA, Roth EJ, Shephard T. AHA scientific statement: Physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors. Circulation. 2004;109: 2031-2041. Circulation website. Available at: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/109/16/2031.full. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Junnila JL, Runkle GP. Coronary artery disease screening, treatment, and follow-up. Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice. 2006 Dec; 33(4).

Onitilo AA, Nietert PJ, Egede LE. Effect of depression on all-cause mortality in adults with cancer and differential effects by cancer site. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2006 Sep; 28(5): 396-402.

Physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated December 21, 2015. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Physical activity guidelines for Americans. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated January 9, 2013. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Weightbearing exercise for women and girls. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Ortho Info website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00263. Updated October 2007. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Last reviewed March 2016 by Michael Woods, MD Last Updated: 5/8/2014

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

PT News

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Decreasing Cartilage Loss in Osteoarthritis
Written by the Therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Northern Virginia

Although some over-the-counter nutritional supplements have been advertised as capable of rebuilding cartilage in arthritic joints, the claims most often do not stand up under scientific scrutiny. Read more

2. Treating Degenerative Meniscus Tears
Written by the Therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Northern Virginia

During the aging process, the fibrous cartilage between the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia) within the knee can degenerate and become prone to tearing. Read more

3. Five Stretching Tips Before You Workout
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

As temperatures start to warm up, many of you will start to hit the streets, trails, and parks to exercise outdoors. Read more

Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

GuidelinesPreventThrowingInjuries#3_FBsize

In this third intallment of our series to prevent throwing injuries, we examine the proper ways to exercise and prevent throwing injuries in baseball. If you have any sudden significant increase in pain, swelling, or discoloration while performing or following exercise, discontinue immediately and contact your primary care provider.


INTERNAL ROTATION WITH SHOULDER AT 90 DEGREES OF ABDUCTION
Attach band high up on a doorway and face away from door. Hold band and move your arm out sideways away from your body until your arm is parallel with the ground. Bend your elbow to 90 degrees and point your fist toward the ceiling. Rotate from your shoulder bringing your hand forward while keeping your arm parallel to the floor and your elbow bent to 90 degrees.


EXTERNAL ROTATION WITH SHOULDER AT 90 DEGREES OF ABDUCTION
Attach band high on a doorway and face toward the door. Hold band and move your arm out sideways away from your body until your arm is parallel with the ground. Bend your elbow to 90 degrees and point your fist toward the door. Rotate from your shoulder bringing your hand away from the door while keeping your arm parallel to the floor and your elbow bent to 90 degrees.


SHOULDER INTERNAL ROTATION AT SIDE
Attach band to the doorway at chest height. Stand perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you are exercising closest to the door. Keep your arm at your side with a towel roll under the arm and bend the elbow to 90 degrees. Bring your hand toward your stomach while keeping the elbow bent to 90 degrees.


SHOULDER EXTERNAL ROTATION AT SIDE
Attach band to the doorway at chest height. Stand perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you are exercising furthest from the door. Keep your arm at your side with a towel roll under the arm and bend the elbow to 90 degrees. Bring your hand away from your stomach while keeping the elbow bent to 90 degrees.

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 24 locations in Georgia and Florida. Advance Rehabilitation is a physical therapy practice that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. We specialize in physical therapy, sports medicine, industrial rehabilitation and athletic training. Our staff includes highly-trained professionals that serve as a bridge between injury and recovery to help patients get back to pre-injury status as quickly as possible. For more information click here.

See the entire Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries series here:

   Prevent Throwing Injuries

   prevent throwing injuries

throwing injuries PTandMe

Baby Mechanics

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

BabyMechanics_FBsize

Proper lifting mechanics is important for everyone, especially for a new mom. Caring for a young child/infant significantly increases the strain to one’s low back. Luckily, there are steps that one can make to decrease that strain and reduce the risk of injury.

Always remember to: lift the child/infant close to you and bend through your legs versus your back.

As your baby begins to gain more independence and mobility, lower the height of his mattress to keep him safe. Be aware that the lower mattress height can increase strain on your back, so lower the mattress height as gradually as possible. When lifting your baby in or out of the crib, keep baby as close to your body as possible while keeping your back straight and bending through your legs. For older babies, help him get into a sitting position before lifting him out of the crib. Once baby can stand, lift him out of the crib from a standing position.

Just like lifting baby out of the crib, keep her as close to you as possible, bend through your legs and keep your back straight. Keep your abdominal muscles tight as you lift her up. If possible, get into a deep squat position to lower your center of gravity before picking up baby.

Avoid the “hip shift” position with baby propped on one hip while shifting your body to that side. Instead hold baby in front of you with his legs out on either side of you. If you are going to be holding baby for an extended period of time, use a baby carrier to keep your baby supported in a neutral alignment.

Tummy time isn’t just good for babies! During tummy time, get down on your stomach too. Stretching out on your stomach is good for you, and it also allows you to better interact with your baby.

During story time, be aware of your posture and always sit up straight. Place a pillow behind your back for extra support.

Use a nursing pillow under baby to help prop her up closer to you. Bring baby to you instead of leaning forward towards her to avoid strain. Placing a pillow behind your back can provide extra support and help you maintain the proper posture. If you are bottle feeding or for older babies, place a pillow under the arm that is supporting baby’s head to decrease the strain on your shoulder and neck. Although making eye contact with baby during a feeding can help strengthen your relationship with baby, it can cause strain on your neck. Be sure to bring your head to a neutral position throughout the feeding to decrease the tension on your neck.

baby car seat

When lifting a car seat, be sure to keep the car seat as close to your body as possible. Bend through your legs and keep your abdominal muscles tight as you pick up the car seat. Instead of carrying the car seat in one hand at your side, use both hands to hold and carry the car seat in front of you whenever possible.

Getting the car seat in and out of the car can be tricky. Remember to keep the car seat as close to your body as possible, keep your abdominal muscles tight and your back straight. If your car seat is placed in the middle position in your car, put one leg up into the car to protect your back while keeping the car seat close to your body.

This information was written by Metro Spine & Sports Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations in the Chicago Loop and Lakeview areas. At Metro Spine & Sports Rehabilitation, their number one priority is the patient. For more information click here.

concussion treatment

Concussion Treatment and What to Expect

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Concussion treatment

CONCUSSION TREATMENT AND WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Our goal is to alleviate all concussion related symptoms so that you may return to a normal, symptom free life.
  • Vestibular, oculomotor, cognitive and cardiovascular exercises will be incorporated into your treatment. Some exercises will bring on symptoms, which is normal. By introducing symptoms in a controlled manner, we are retraining the brain to adapt to these demands.
  • To monitor your symptoms while you are here, imagine that when you come in you have a “gas tank” or work capacity of 100%. We would like to work until your brain is at 50%. The goal is to fatigue your brain to make it stronger, not to make it hurt.
  • In the first 24 hours after therapy, you may experience an increase in symptoms, fatigue and emotional changes.
  • Routine activities such as work and school may bring on symptoms. you should work until symptoms appear, then rest until they are gone. Finding your limit and not going beyond it will contribute to your success.
  • Symptoms can be limited at home, school and work by minimizing screen time, especially at night and learning when your body and brain need to rest.
  • Exercises will slowly increase in duration and intensity as your treatment progresses and your brain begins to heal.

This information about concussion treatment was written by Rehab Associates of Central Virginia, they are dedicated to working with one another as a team across their sub-specialty practices and their our physician partners. For more information click here.

More PTandMe articles about concussions can be found here:

concussion physical therapy   

   

Physical Therapist

Want to be a Physical Therapist?

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

WantToBePT_FBsize

PHYSICAL THERAPIST
WHAT DO THEY DO?
PTs are health care professionals who provide rehabilitation for musculoskeletal issues.
Rehabilitation includes programs focused on:

  • Strengthening
  • Range of motion
  • Balance training
  • Functional training
  • Gait training
  • Return to work programs
  • Pain reduction

Physical therapist’s goal is to return patients to a normal life, that is pain free.

HOW TO BECOME A LICENSED PHYSICAL THERAPIST?
1.) Bachelor’s degree, that includes required Prerequisites for PT schools of your choice.
2.) Doctorate degree from credited school which includes a number of hands on clinical experiences.
3.) Apply & sit for licensure exam in state, you choose to work.

PTleg

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Work as part of the Rehabilitative team to provide physical therapy services under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist.
PTAs implement:

  • Selected components of patient/client interventions (treatment)
  • Obtain data related to the interventions provided
  • Make modifications in selected interventions either to progress the patient/client as directed by the physical therapist

HOW TO BECOME A PTA?
1.) Attend CAPTE – accredited associated program
2.) Apply & sit for licensure exam

JOB SETTINGS: Any setting in which a PTA can work

ATC

CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) are health care professionals who work alongside physicians to provide:

  • Preventative services
  • Emergency care
  • Clinical diagnosis
  • Therapeutic intervention
  • Rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions

Certified Athletic Trainers can help you avoid unnecessary medical treatment and disruption of normal daily life.

HOW DO I BECOME A CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER (ATC)?
1.) Graduate from a bachelors or master’s degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
2.) Pass the certification examination conducted by the Board of Certification (BOC).
3.) Once certified, he/she must meet ongoing continuing education requirements in order to remain certified.
4.) Athletic trainers must also work under the direction of a physician and within their state practice act.

JOB SETTINGS

  • Colleges & Universities
  • Hospital & Clinical
  • Occupational Health
  • Military
  • Performing Arts
  • Physician Extender
  • Professional Sports
  • Public Safety

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations in Georgia and Florida, that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. For more information click here.