Category Archives: Women’s Health

How to Sit on the Toilet to Relieve Constipation

How to Sit on The Toilet to Relieve Constipation

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How to Sit on the Toilet to Relieve Constipation

Using your belly and pelvic floor muscles to help bring about a bowel movement is instinctive for most people. However, people sometimes have problems with these muscles and must relearn proper emptying techniques. If you discover weaknesses in your muscles, continuously ignore and fight the urge to go to the bathroom, or consume a diet low in fiber and water, you may be straining to conduct a bowel movement. You may be doing this if you:

  • Hold your breath or take in a gulp of air and hold it.
  • Keep your lips and jaw tensed and closed tightly.
  • Turn red in the face because of excessive pushing or forcing.
  • Develop hemorrhoids or have existing hemorrhoids worsen.
  • Get faint while pushing.
  • Aren’t emptying, resulting in many trips to the restroom to feel complete.

Straining makes it harder to conduct a bowel movement. In some cases, the anus can tighten instead of relaxing and opening, resulting in difficulty getting stool out. Here’s how to sit on the toilet to relieve constipation.

Position to Relieve Constipation

EVACUATION PLAN: Conducted in 4 Basic Steps

When conducting a bowel movement, it is essential to position yourself appropriately.

  1. Lean forward enough for your elbows to rest on your knees. Keep your back straight and avoid slouching.
  2. Support your feet on the floor or use a low stool if your feet don’t touch the ground.
  3. Push out your belly as if you have swallowed a beach ball. You should feel a widening in your waist.
  4. Exhale and keep your stomach out.

Position to Relieve Constipation  Rectal Squatted Position While Pooping on the Toilet

Proper Bowel Elimination

Your healthcare practitioner may make the following additional suggestions and adjustments:

  • Sit on the toilet.
    • Make sure your feet are supported.
    • Notice your hip angle and spine position – most people lean forward or raise their knees, which can help the muscles surrounding the anus to relax.
    • when you lean forward, place your forearms on your thighs for support.
    • With proper positioning, the pelvic floor muscles relax, and the bowel angle decreases, allowing ease of elimination.
  • Relax.
    • The digestive tract starts at the mouth and ends at the anal opening, so be sure to relax both ends of the tube.
    • Breathe deeply in through your nose and out slowly through your mouth.
    • Keep your pelvic floor muscles relaxed; let your belly bulge out.
  • Empty.
    • Inhale and stick your belly out as if you swallowed a beach ball.
    • Exhale, keep your belly out and make it hard; this widens the anal opening.
  • Complete.
    • After completing your bowel movement, you can consider performing one or two pelvic floor muscle contractions.

Consider these steps when you sit on the toilet to relieve constipation. If you don’t feel any progress after conducting these steps, consult a health practitioner about the next steps in the process. Visit our Pelvic Health Page for more information about how physical therapy can help.

Written by Life Fitness Physical Therapy, with multiple locations throughout the Baltimore Area.

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Physical Therapy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Physical Therapy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

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Physical Therapy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

What is pelvic organ prolapse?

Pelvic organ prolapse, categorized as a pelvic floor disorder, affects almost 3% of women in the U.S. The pelvic floor is a group of muscles that form a hammock across the patient’s pelvic opening. These muscles and the tissues surrounding them keep the pelvic organ in place. These organs include the bladder, uterus and cervix, vagina, small bowel, and rectum. These muscles and tissues can develop problems or disorders and become more common as women age.

What is a prolapse?

Prolapse can happen when the pelvis muscles and tissues can no longer support these organs because they are weak or damaged and can cause one or more pelvic organs to drop or press into or out of the vagina.

What causes pelvic organ prolapse?

Pelvic organ prolapse is when the muscles and ligaments supporting a patient’s pelvic organs weaken, and the pelvic organs can drop lower into the pelvis, creating a bulge in the vagina (prolapse). Pelvic organ prolapse most commonly develops years after childbirth, a hysterectomy, or menopause.

Patients may experience pelvic pain for a variety of reasons. These reasons could include:

  • Myofascial (muscle & fascia): Muscles of the pelvic floor can be tense, weak, shortened, or uncoordinated. Scars and fascia tightness may contribute to pain.
  • Organ-related: The origin of the pain is primarily from an organ: the vulva, bladder, bowels, or uterus; Common medical diagnoses include vulvodynia, interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, endometriosis, irritable bowel syndrome, or menstrual pain.
  • Nerve-related: Pudendal neuralgia is often referred to as “the carpel tunnel syndrome of the pelvic floor”. This condition is brought forth by the pudendal nerve compressing and can cause perineal or rectal pain. Injuries during childbirth, prolonged downward pressure on the pelvic floor, prolonged sitting, and bicycling are common causes of pudendal neuralgia.

What are the symptoms of a pelvic organ prolapse?

  • Feeling of pressure, discomfort, aching, or fullness in the pelvis.
  • Pelvic pressure that worsens with standing or coughing as the day continues.
  • Trouble controlling bowels or urine, leading to leaks.
  • Uncomfortable pressure during physical activity.

*Symptoms could worsen at certain times of the day, during physical activity, or after standing for a long time.

Physical Therapy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy is one of the most common treatments for pelvic organ prolapse. This specialized physical therapy relieves the symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction and strives to help the patient’s muscles work how they should.

Pelvic floor therapy typically includes several exercises and helps the muscles relax and gain strength. A pelvic health physical therapist will work with the patient to see how strong their core muscles are and how much endurance their body has while checking the coordination of their pelvic floor muscles.

This initial assessment will help develop a plan exclusively for the patient’s body. Pelvic floor therapy plans commonly include both external and internal therapy.

Dry Needling Trigger point therapy

Trigger point dry needling is a safe, effective, and efficient treatment technique to release pain from taut bands of skeletal muscle. Trigger point dry needling uses small, thin needles to stimulate underlying myofascial trigger points, muscular and connective tissues for the management of many orthopedic conditions, both acute and chronic. By inserting a needle into the dysfunctional tissue, it often leads to a contraction of the muscle which then stimulates a release. This leads to a reduction of pain, improvements in flexibility, and restoration of normalized movement when combined with corrective exercises.

Kegels

Kegels are known for strengthening the pelvic floor as well. This exercise can help the pelvic floor muscles by contracting and relaxing them. Pelvic floor exercises such as Kegels are personalized exclusively for each patient. These personalized routines include the number of repetitions, variety of positions, time holding a pose, time relaxing, and coordination with breathing and other key muscle groups. Talk to a pelvic health physical therapist about conducting this exercise and adding it to your personalized plan.

Electrical Stimulation (ESTIM)

Pelvic health physical therapists may include ESTIM as part of treatment.  Electrical stimulation works by inserting a small probe into the vagina and sending mild electrical impulses to stimulate the muscles in your pelvic floor. Electrical Stimulation can help reduce pain and muscle spasms in the pelvic region.

Biofeedback

Biofeedback, like electrical stimulation, uses a device to check the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles. It works by placing electrodes on the outside of the body or using internal probes to measure the tension and relaxation of the pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic health physical therapists use biofeedback to help guide patients as they work to strengthen or relax pelvic floor muscles.

Pelvic floor physical therapy can help reduce and eliminate symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse. Research supports using pelvic floor muscle training as an effective treatment option for patients with Grade 1 or Grade 2 pelvic organ prolapse. Once an individual’s prolapse exceeds Grade 2, they may still be able to proceed with pelvic floor therapy, but surgery is the recommended treatment for Grade 3 and Grade 4 pelvic organ prolapse.

If you find yourself in need of a pelvic health physical therapist, talk to your Ob/Gyn about what options are right for you.

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post mastectomy physical therapy

Post-Mastectomy Physical Therapy

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The word cancer is a scary one. Even though we all hope that it never becomes part of our lifetime of trials, more often than not, we know someone that has had, or is currently dealing with cancer. It is a testament to the medical community that so many women are able to wear the pink ribbon as a sign of triumph and pride, but we still mourn with those that wear it as a sign of remembrance and loss. More than once, while talking with women that have begun treatment for breast cancer, the topic of whether or not to have a mastectomy has come up. It’s not a decision taken lightly, often one with multiple concerns about what happens after surgery. Will the cancer be gone for good? Will it hurt? How long will it take to recover? A physical therapy post-mastectomy program can help address these issues.

Physical Therapy can’t answer all of those questions, but one thing a physical therapy post mastectomy program can do is aid in the overall recovery process by focusing on regaining strength and increasing the range of motion in your shoulder and arm. Early intervention by a physical therapist can help women regain full function following mastectomy surgery, regardless of whether or not a woman has had reconstruction. Rehabilitation is always tailored to each patient’s specific needs. Not every patient experiences the same recovery, and as such physical therapists are prepared to help patients experiencing a multitude of symptoms – some have been highlighted below.

Size, location, and the type of mastectomy are important considerations when choosing a type of treatment. Exercises to maintain shoulder range of motion and arm mobility may be prescribed as early as 24 hours after surgery.  These exercises are important in restoring strength and promoting good circulation. As rehabilitation progresses these exercises may be modified to meet new goals.

After mastectomy surgery, patients may experience tightness around the surgical site. This is caused by scar tissue formation. The result can be very dense tissue under the incision, which is painful and can restrict range of motion.  The restricted range of motion puts a woman at risk for a painful condition known as frozen shoulder. Early treatment by a physical therapist can help reduce the pain and help regain functional range of motion and strength.

Numbness and/or nerve sensitivity at the surgical site can develop post-mastectomy. Manual therapy can help restore sensation and relieve nerve pain. In severe cases, a chronic condition known as post-mastectomy pain syndrome may develop.  This is caused by scar tissue impinging on nerves. Physical therapy can be very effective at releasing scar tissue and reducing this nerve-related pain.

Axillary node dissection can lead to a condition known as cording or axillary web syndrome.  Cording presents as a moderate to painful tightening, which appears as “cords” emanating from the armpit and extending down the arm. Cording significantly restricts the range of motion and arm function. Manual therapy and therapeutic stretching helps to resolve this condition quickly.

Radiation treatment after mastectomy surgery can exacerbate posture and range of motion problems, causing fibrosis and skin tightness. Manual therapy can remediate these issues and may prevent them from ever becoming a problem.

The Benefits of Exercise and Physical Therapy post-mastectomy treatment programs can differ greatly as seen above, but there are a few benefits that all patients can benefit from:

  • Improved shoulder range of motion
  • Improved shoulder strength
  • Improved functional mobility
  • Improved posture
  • Decreased pain at the surgical site
  • Decreased edema on the affected side
  • Improved sensation at the surgical site

Meeting with a physical therapist before surgery can help you feel more at ease and more confident in your overall recovery goals. It’s never too early to ask questions! To find a physical therapy clinic near you click here.

For more information on cancer-related physical therapy programs click here:

    

 

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physical therapy benefits pregnant women

5 Ways Physical Therapy Benefits Pregnant Women

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Pregnancy is a wonderful process, but as part of the process, women endure many physiological changes, including an intense physical strain that can lead to discomfort and pain in certain parts of the body.

Most people associate physical therapy with patients that have suffered severe injuries from an accident. But they are not the only ones in need of it. Proper therapy is also fantastic for helping expectant mothers prepare for labor as well as remedying common discomforts associated with this special time. Since labor and delivery can be tedious, the need to prepare the body for the challenge should not be overlooked.

If you’re pregnant, don’t wait until the pain or other issues associated with pregnancy becomes unbearable before seeking help. Here, the PTandMe team takes a look at some of the reasons to consider physical therapy during this unique part of your life.

1. Lower back pain relief

The fact that there is new life forming inside a woman forces her body to change in wonderful ways that in turn leads to bouts of discomfort and even pain. Her center of gravity changes as the baby increases in size, leaving her struggling to maintain balance, especially while standing. The muscles of a woman’s bodywork to continuously provide support.

The alignment of a pregnant woman’s spine is eventually affected too, straining the back, shoulder, and neck muscles. If these changes go unchecked, many pregnant women develop lower back and/or SI pain. A recent study has shown that pregnant women with lower back or SI pain felt better with physical therapy. Physical therapy during the prenatal period helps manage these new aches and pains, thereby improving the quality of life.

2. The right choice of exercises

During pregnancy, women struggle with joint and spinal alignment, posture, muscle strength, weight gain, and nerve involvement. This could eventually lead to stress and fatigue, with a reduced willingness to participate in physical activity.

However, a physical therapist can recommend targeted exercises that increase muscle strength, easing the discomfort during pregnancy and after delivery.
Better still, the majority of these exercises are ones that can be performed at home without having to visit a gym. With improved metabolism and endurance, women are in better shape to drop some pounds after pregnancy – if that’s something they would like to do.

3. Ease other pregnancy complications

There are hormones released in the body during pregnancy that helps pregnant women adapt to their new reality. As these changes continue, women tend to struggle with other issues like nausea, heartburn, abdominal pain, and urinary problems, as well as musculoskeletal problems. Urinary issues typically involve difficulty in controlling the bladder due to the stretched pelvic floor muscles.

The right sleeping posture and a quality mattress can help with easing pregnancy pains and woes. Many experts advise placing a pillow between your legs and behind your back or investing in a wedge pillow. Similarly, if you are struggling to get precious zzz’s in bed, try sleeping in a recliner in a semi-upright position. This will take the weight off your feet and spine, relieve pressure and pains, and help with back pain. With physical therapy, women learn pelvic floor exercises, strengthening the muscles, and alleviating many common pregnancy issues, including incontinence.

4. Smoother labor and delivery

Unless advised otherwise by a physician, physical activity can improve strength and flexibility during pregnancy and childbirth. A perineal massage may also be recommended by your health care provider as it improves stretching during labor and reduces the chances of tears within that region while giving birth.

Electromyography (EMG) can also be used by the physical therapist to detect a suitable position that will be more comfortable for a more natural delivery. With proper testing, the biofeedback can provide enough information to guarantee a smooth process without complications.

5. A quicker recovery post-pregnancy

Like athletes and victims of accidents with severe injuries, women also need physical therapy to recover faster after childbirth.

Whether there was an episiotomy or not, all women would like to resume normal activities as soon as they can post-childbirth, without difficulties. With the right treatment and program, women can ease that pain much faster postpartum. Through strengthening those weakened muscles with selected exercises, you can enjoy a healthier and happier life.
Consider booking an online physical therapy appointment

Although we strongly recommend consulting a physical therapist, COVID-19 has made it difficult for them to offer regular assessment and treatment services in person. Fortunately, we work with some fantastic physical and occupational therapists who provide a range of assessments and recovery programs to help you get back to your routine fitness after injury.

To find out more about how physical therapy benefits pregnant women, contact a physical therapist near you.

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PT News May 2020

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout April & May 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. COVID-19 Scientific Update and Masks

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Berks & Montgomery Counties in PA.

The fact that many people are asymptomatic is excellent news; however, it also means that COVID-19 could be spread to those most vulnerable unknowingly. This is why vigilance in continuing the CDC prevention techniques (frequent hand-washing, wear a face mask, clean and disinfect, social distancing, stay home when sick, cover cough or sneeze) is critical as we open up our communities.  Read more

 

2. Keeping You Safe While Serving Your PT Needs

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Greater San Antonio, TX 

What are we doing to keep our clinics a safe place to receive care? Below are the steps we have taken to ensure the safety of our patients and staff is preserved. Read more

 

3. Heart Rate Zone Training

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, WI.

Wanting to make good use of your extra time at home? Take a look at the facts below to learn how to use heart rate zones to increase your cardiovascular fitness. Modes of cardio: walking, running, biking, swimming.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News February 2020

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout February 2020. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. 8 Great Pelvic Floor Stretches to do During Pregnancy

Written by Ability Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout Tampa and Orlando, FL.

Stretching and strengthening your pelvic floor muscles during pregnancy can help relieve your aches and pains — and alleviate stress and tension too. Pelvic floor stretches will also help you have an easier delivery and decrease your risk of urinary incontinence later on.  Read more

 

neck pain

2. Treat Your Back and Neck Pain with Our Advanced PT Methods

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Greater Columbus, OH

Did you know that studies say approximately 90% of people will be plagued by back or neck pain at some point in their lives? While it is a common complaint, it can sometimes be difficult to determine where the pain is originating on your own. Read more

 

3. Older is Better: Strength Training for the Aging

Written by Wright Physical Therapy an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Idaho.

Aging adults often attribute their aches, pains, and illnesses to “getting too old”. Age can be used altogether too much as a crutch to avoid exercise and activity. When it comes to health in general, the aging individual has so much upside to focusing on wellness in their lifestyle.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News December 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

nutrition strategies

1. Effective Nutrition Strategies

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout greater Grand Rapids, MI.

How do you stay on target with eating healthy and being active? Between work schedules, kid’s schedules, appointments, and change of plans, finding time to exercise and eat right can sometimes feel impossible. Read more

 

crossfit

2. Is Crossfit Right For You?

Written by Riverview Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations in Southern Maine. 

CrossFit is no longer a form of exercise performed in small gyms; it is a phenomenon that has taken the world by storm. At its roots, CrossFit is a popular form of exercise utilizing high-intensity fitness programming that incorporates elements from many disciplines: including weightlifting, traditional cardiovascular exercise (running, jumping rope, biking, rowing), and basic gymnastic movements. Read more

 

lymphedema physical therapy

3. Lymphedema Therapy – You Don’t Have to Live with Chronic Swelling

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties in PA.

One cause of chronic swelling could be lymphedema. This is a condition where swelling occurs in the extremities due to a compromised or damaged lymph system. Lymph is the fluid that bathes the cells with needed nutrients, oxygen, and white blood cells provided by the circulatory system.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News July 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout July 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

when your arm is a pain in the neck

1. When Your Arm is a Pain in the Neck
Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Many times, the initial discomfort results from nerves in the neck being pinched because the shoulder blade is not positioned correctly. Raising your arm above your head takes the stretch off the nerve and provides relief, but carrying something like a bag of groceries increases the stretch on the nerve, thus escalating the pain.  Read more

 

hydrate

2. Hydration During Exercise and Competition

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice throughout the PA’s Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

The fact that the body is made up of 60% water, and the brain 85%, makes water an essential nutrient for bodily function. Without adequate hydration, sports performance will be negatively affected, and serious illness, or death, can occur. Read more

 

rotator cuff exercises

3. 4 Exercises for Rotator Cuff Strength

Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with 3physical therapy locations in CT. 

This week, we will go over the rotator cuff anatomy, and provide you with 4 of our go-to exercises for strengthening the rotator cuff! Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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women's health physical therapy

4 Common Pelvic Issues Seen by Physical Therapists

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Women’s bodies and their wellness are unique. Many factors cause problems specific to women’s bodies. Physical therapists specializing in women’s health can help female patients eliminate or manage pelvic pain or problems while restoring their quality of life. Using a comprehensive approach to evaluation and treatment, women’s health physical therapy programs can provide relief for these 4 common pelvic issues:

  • Pelvic floor pain or dysfunction
  • Pelvic organ prolapse (POP)
  • Postpartum recovery and or pain
  • Urinary incontinence

1. Pelvic Floor Pain or Dysfunction

Pelvic pain can occur for many reasons. One typical cause is what is called a hypertonus dysfunction or an unusual tightening of the pelvic floor muscles. This is common after a long delivery and scar tissue formation from a healing episiotomy. It can also occur from sexual abuse or when the muscles tighten to prevent the “falling out” sensation that occurs with the prolapse of the internal organs. The primary symptom is pain, but it can occur in the back, perivaginal area, lower abdomen, or thighs.

women's health physical therapy

How physical therapy can help pelvic pain patients:

Physical therapy can help to eliminate or manage pelvic pain while restoring the quality of life. This is possible through a comprehensive approach to the evaluation and treatment of the pelvic floor.

 

2. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

According to the International Urogynecology Association (IUGA) and the International Continence Society (ICS), pelvic organ prolapse is defined as the descent of one or more of the anterior vaginal wall, the posterior vaginal wall, the uterus (cervix) or the apex of the vagina (vaginal vault or cuff after hysterectomy). POP can be caused by a variety of circumstances including vaginal childbirth, increased age and/or BMI, increased abdominal pressure, and connective tissue disorder.  The symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) include:

  • Many women are asymptomatic
  • The sensation of pressure or heaviness in the vagina
  • Feeling of bulging or something coming out of the vagina
  • Urinary symptoms: incontinence, position change or manual reduction of prolapse needed to initiate or complete voiding, weak or prolonged stream, incomplete emptying, obstructed voiding symptoms
  • Bowel symptoms: incontinence, feeling of incomplete emptying, straining, digital evacuation, splinting of vagina or perineum to aid emptying
  • Sexual symptoms: decreased lubrication, sensation, arousal, or dyspareunia

How physical therapy can help pelvic organ prolapse patients:

  • Pelvic floor muscle training (recommended as the first line of treatment in stage 1-2 of pelvic organ prolapse)
  • Strength and endurance training of underactive pelvic floor
  • Stretching and relaxation of an overactive pelvic floor
  • Lifestyle modification to reduce the effect of increased abdominal pressure on the pelvic organ support system

In addition to physical therapy, other treatments for POP may include pharmacological treatment, the use of mechanical devices, and surgical intervention.

 

3. Post Partum Recovery and/or Pain

Birthing a baby is a joyful and yet very traumatic experience. Regardless of the method of delivery, whether VBAC or Cesarean Section, each birth comes with its own potential postpartum problems. From urinary incontinence to pelvic pain, there are just some things after childbirth that are not glamorous and can be embarrassing
to discuss.

While some issues will resolve over time, there may be treatments that can help. Pelvic health physical therapy can address diastasis recti (a tear in the
abdominal wall), urinary incontinence, low back/ pelvic girdle/hip pain, pain with intercourse, or scar pain to name a few postpartum unpleasantries that may benefit from physical therapy.

Potential postpartum problems that can be helped with physical therapy:

  • Urinary incontinence
  • Pain with intercourse
  • Pelvic floor pain
  • Scar pain
  • Diastasis recti
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Difficulty returning to exercise

If you find yourself 6 weeks postpartum and still suffering, please discuss with your OB-GYN and decide if a referral to physical therapy may help.

 

4. Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence can be embarrassing but it doesn’t have to be part of your life. Do you have to change pads every couple of hours? Do you worry
about going out because you need to know where the closest bathroom is? Do you always carry a change of clothes with you? Do you not travel or exercise because of fear of leakage? Don’t live in fear of urinary leakage.

Symptoms of Urinary Incontinence Include:

  • Involuntary loss of urine
  • Increased daytime/ nighttime frequency
  • Urgency
  • Post voiding retention
  • Straining to avoid dribble
  • Leakage with efforts like coughing or other activities.

How physical therapy can help urinary incontinence patients:

  • Behavioral interventions (urge suppression techniques, dietary modifications, appropriate fluid intake, weight loss, habit training)
  • Pelvic muscle re-training (for overactive) as well as underactive pelvic floor
  • Bladder training (bladder diary or scheduled voiding)
  • Neuromuscular re-education (NMES) and biofeedback devices

 

What to expect during a women’s health physical therapy session:

Each person will be individually evaluated and treated in a quiet, private, safe space. The initial evaluation may include an internal exam if the patient is comfortable in order to properly assess the patient’s musculature and symptoms.

  • Musculoskeletal assessment: An evaluation to identify causes of poor postural alignment, strength, flexibility and movement patterns which cause orthopedic pain Soft Tissue Mobilization – to release adhesional restrictions.
  • Observation and palpation of the pelvic floor to the patient’s comfort level
  • Stretching and strengthening techniques
  • Relaxation techniques
  • Soft tissue and joint mobilization
  • Modalities: Interferential electrical stimulation, ultrasound, heat or cold therapy.
  • Biofeedback: Provides measurable assessment of the pelvic floor muscles ability to contract and relax in function.
  • Behavior modification
  • Educational instruction: Home exercise programs and information concerning diet, sleep, work and rest positions and self-management of symptoms.

If you find yourself in need of women’s health physical therapy, talk to your doctor or physical therapist and see if physical therapy would be a good fit for your symptoms. To find a physical therapist near you visit our Find A PT page.

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Contributions to this blog post were provided by Spring-Klein Physical Therapy (Spring, TX), Therapy Partners of North Texas (North Richland Hills), and STAR Physical Therapy (65 locations throughout TN)

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PT News June 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. 8 Great Pelvic Floor Stretches to Do During Pregnancy
Written by Ability Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout Orlando and Tampa Bay.

retching and strengthening your pelvic floor muscles during pregnancy can help relieve your aches and pains — and alleviate stress and tension too. Pelvic floor stretches will also help you have an easier delivery and decrease your risk of urinary incontinence later on.  Read more

 

get active square

2. Get Active to Stay Active

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, a privately owned, outpatient physical therapy practice throughout Central Oregon.

Summer is a time to have fun and spend time outdoors. It is an opportunity to enjoy the sunshine. It’s a time when you can go out for a walk and roll down the windows and take in everything that nature has to offer, allergies and all. Read more

 

3. For Shoulder Relief Try These Home Remedies

Written by Sport and Spine Physical Therapy with 4 physical therapy locations in Southern, WI.

Shoulder pain can be one of the most disabling problems to deal with. Whether you realize it or not, you use your shoulder pretty frequently throughout most days, as it permits practically any movement that involves your arms. Read more