Category Archives: Sports and Fitness

PT News PTandMe

PT News October 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout October 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

sport specialization

1. Sports Specialization Vs. Sports Diversification in Youth Athletes

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout greater Grand Rapids.

Early specialization in one sport has become a trend in youth athletes across the country. This shift is one that has young athletes training year round to develop a specialized skill be able to play at the highest level of competition. Read more

 

food is fuel

2. Food is Your Fuel

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout greater Bend, OR. 

Truth: we are not nutritionists. That said, after a bit of trial and error and working with patients and various health professionals, we have picked up on these and common do’s and dont’s. Lindsey Hagen, PT, and healthy running nut discusses the importance of balance in your diet and making sure you do what is best for your body, as they say, “You do you…” Read more

 

walking up stairs

3. Climbing Stairs – One Step at a Time

Written by The Jackson Clinics an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations across Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa

Although going up the stairs may feel challenging, some people experience more pain going down. This is because your muscles have to work hard to control your weight as you descend. If you have suffered from knee problems in the past or continue to have problems, it is probably time to look at increasing strength to make navigating stairs less difficult. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

concussion baseline testing

Post Concussion Recovery: Why Baseline Testing is Important

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussions are serious

Medical providers may describe a concussion as a “mild” brain injury because concussions are usually not life-threatening. Even so, the effects of a concussion can be serious.

Once an athlete has been suspected of having a concussion… when is it safe to go back to play? The answer is different for everyone, but there are few baseline tests that medical professionals can administer to make sure that a gradual return to play, work and activity is safe and won’t lead to further damage.

When an athlete has a concussion, it’s important to know how much their functional and cognitive abilities have been affected. With a baseline test you give medical professionals an accurate starting point to correctly evaluate the impact of the injury.

FAQs about Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussion baseline testing is a pre-season exam conducted by a trained health care professional. Baseline tests are used to assess an athlete’s balance and brain function (including learning and memory skills, ability to pay attention or concentrate, and how quickly he or she thinks and solve problems), as well as for the presence of any concussion symptoms. Results from baseline tests (or pre-injury tests) can be used and compared to a similar exam conducted by a health care professional during the season if an athlete has a suspected concussion.

Baseline testing generally takes place during the pre-season—ideally prior to the first practice. It is important to note that some baseline and concussion assessment tools are only suggested for use among athletes ages 10 years and older.

How is baseline testing information used if an athlete has a suspected concussion?

Results from baseline testing can be used if an athlete has a suspected concussion. Comparing post-injury test results to baseline test results can assist health care professionals in identifying the effects of the injury and making more informed return to school and play decisions.

Education should always be provided to athletes and parents if an athlete has a suspected concussion. This should include information on safely returning to school and play, tips to aid in recovery (such as rest), danger signs and when to seek immediate care, and how to help reduce an athlete’s risk for a future concussion.

What should be included as part of baseline testing?

Baseline testing should include a check for concussion symptoms, as well as balance and cognitive (such as concentration and memory) assessments. Computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be included as a piece of an overall baseline test to assess an athlete’s concentration, memory, and reaction time.

During the baseline pre-season test, health care professionals should also assess for a prior history of concussion (including symptoms experienced and length of recovery from the injury). It is also important to record other medical conditions that could impact recovery after concussion, such as a history of migraines, depression, mood disorders, or anxiety, as well as learning disabilities and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Baseline testing also provides an important opportunity to educate athletes and others about concussion and return to school and play protocol.

Who should administer baseline tests?

Baseline tests should only be conducted by a trained health care professional such as a physician, physical therapist or trained ATC.

Who should interpret baseline tests?

Only a trained health care professional with experience in concussion management should interpret the results of a baseline exam. When possible, ideally a neuropsychologist should interpret the computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological test components of a baseline exam. Results of neuropsychological tests should not be used as a stand-alone diagnostic tool, but should serve as one component used by health care professionals to make a return to school and play decisions.

How often should an athlete undergo concussion baseline testing?

If baseline testing is used, research suggests that most components of baseline testing be repeated annually to establish a valid test result for comparison. Baseline computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be repeated every 2 years. However, more frequent neuropsychological testing may be needed if an athlete has sustained a concussion or if the athlete has a medical condition that could affect the results of the test.

Many physical therapy clinics have therapists that have been trained in baseline testing software and techniques. Physical therapists can also specialize in return to sports programs for athletes that have experienced concussions.  The decision of when you go back to your sport can be a critical one… especially if you go back to soon. Prevent this by having an accurate baseline available for your healthcare professionals.

Need Physical Therapy? Find a PT Near You!

physical therapy near me

more information can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/

Additional articles from PTandMe about concussions can be found here:

concussion physical therapy   

concussion treatment   

PT News PTandMe

PT News August 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout August 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Physical Therapy Direct Access

1. Physical Therapy Direct Access is Coming to Texas
Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Starting September 1, 2019, it will be easier to get Physical Therapy in Texas, thanks to local San Antonio State Representative, Ina Minjarez (D) who drafted HB29, a handful of other State Reps who co-sponsored the bill, the Texas Medical Association, and the Texas Orthopedic Association.  Read more

 

House workout

2. Get Your Housework(Out) Done!

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR and the surrounding communities. 

Let’s get honest for a second though and realize not all moments are adventure packed (at least for your average community member). Here are some fantastic ways to make even the down time productive and moving you in a healthy direction… and you get the chores done! Read more

 

AEW Ability Rehab

3. Ability Rehabilitation Played Key Role at AEW’s Two Florida Based Events

Written by Ability Rehabilitation an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Tampa and Orlando.

Florida-based Ability Health Services & Rehabilitation worked closely with All Elite Wrestling (AEW) to provide athletic training and physical therapy care to the wrestlers at the recent FYTER FEST and FIGHT FOR THE FALLEN events, which both took place last month in Daytona Beach and Jacksonville, respectively. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

Game Day Nutrition

What to Eat Before, During, & After a Game

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Game Day Nutrition

What athletes eat can have effects on game day performance. It’s important to eat foods that will fuel the body and provide enough energy during the game. Carb-loading, however, is not a beneficial strategy for everybody. Loading up on carbs has both its pros and its cons for different athletes. With this in mind, we have put together our game day nutrition general list of some foods to consider before, during, and after a game.

Before the game

Carbohydrates provide the primary fuel for exercising muscles. Athletes should focus on eating carbs, which are broken down in the small intestine. Limit intake of fat and protein, which are processed in the stomach and can cause cramping and indigestion with exercise.

Consume (3-6 hours before)
  • Pasta
  • Baked potatoes
  • Lean meat
  • Fresh tacos
  • Cheese in a healthy meal
  • Healthy cereal with milk
(2-3 hours before)
  • 12-16 oz. of water, fruit or vegetable juice
  • Bagel with peanut butter
  • Yogurt
  • Granola bars
  • Cheese and crackers
  • Fresh fruit
Avoid
  • High fiber foods – broccoli, baked beans, bran cereal
  • High-fat foods – eggs, meat, cheese
  • Sugar, soda, candy
  • New foods

During the game

Hydrate based on length and intensity of the activity. Replace fluids according to thirst and weather.

Consume
  • Drink 16-32 oz. per hour for workouts longer than 1 hour
  • Water – for activity shorter than 1 hour
  • Sports drinks – for activity longer than 1 hour
  • Watermelon and orange slices are good for halftime
Avoid
  • High sugar snacks and drinks – candy, soda, fruit juice
  • Energy drink, caffeine
  • Refined carbs – bread, pasta
  • Sugar and caffeine may upset the stomach leading to lower performance

After the game

Hard exercise depletes the body of carbohydrates, which are essential for speeding recovery. Proteins are necessary to repair and develop muscle tissue. Athletes should begin to build their body’s supply of both these nutrients within the first 30 minutes after exercise

Consume (in between or after events)
  • Drink 16-32 oz. per hour for workouts longer than 1 hour
  • Peanut butter and jelly sandwich
  • Turkey sandwich
  • Protein, power bars
  • Yogurt
  • Hummus and/ or cheese and crackers
  • Nuts
  • String cheese
  • Raw veggies
Avoid
  • Concession candy
  • High fat, fried foods
  • Energy drinks, soda
  • Large, low protein meals

Injured? Need to find a sports nutritionist to design your game day nutrition plan? Reach out to a physical therapy clinic near you to get a local recommendation and find the help you need!

physical therapy near me

Read our article on carb loading:

Pros and Cons of Carb Loading

aerobic exercise

5 Unique and Fun Ways to Do Aerobic Exercise

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

aerobic exercise

Keeping our bodies healthy and active can be a chore. A well-balanced diet and regular exercise are important but not always fun. Even Zumba class can get old after some time. But there are things we can do to liven up our daily need for movement and luckily, they don’t need to cost a lot.

1. Batch Cooking

Do you want to get your steps in on a recovery day? Maybe you take Sunday’s off from the gym, but you don’t want to be a complete sloth. Try a couple of hours of meal prep before the week gets started. Begin with an easy internet search for some yummy recipes or perhaps discover a food that’s new to you.

2. Mowing the Lawn

The last thing many of us want to do is trudge up and down the lawn in the hot summer sun but this aerobic exercise can burn over 300 calories an hour. It all depends on the type of mower and the terrain, but this activity will keep you fit and make your home look great.

3. Gliding … in your living room

Gliding discs are an uncommon but effective workout that is easy and fun. Like sliding on hardwood floors when we wear socks, these inexpensive plastic discs can be used on carpet, tile and wood flooring without damaging the surface. These discs engage the entire body to maintain balance while working out the legs and booty.

4. Intense Stair Climbing

Have you heard of competitive stair climbing? Yup, there are athletes that race up the stairs of the Empire State Building. Maybe climbing up an Aztec ruin isn’t realistic, but even if you live in a single-story home, there are probably stairs near you. Just look at your office or go to a local park. Don’t fret if there is only one set of steps. Just climb the same flight until your heart rate is elevated.

5. Housework

Chores, whether it’s washing dishes, taking out the trash or vacuuming, are all necessary but uninspiring tasks that come with being an adult. Next time you sit down to watch a show, get up and clean every time a commercial comes on. Challenge yourself to get a task done within the commercial break. If you are paying for a streaming service that doesn’t have commercials, then set a timer to go off every 10-15 minutes and then set it again for 2-3 minute chore breaks. Like mowing the lawn, your body will get the movement it needs, and you also get a nicer living environment.

Make huge strides in aerobic fitness by using these fun and alternative ways to get your heart pounding. Keep it interesting by adding variety to your daily routine and the long-term health benefits are inevitable.

If you need help finding ways to be active ask your physical therapist.  PTs specialize in movement and can be a great resource!

physical therapy near me

This guest post was written by Erika Long. She loves corgis, curry and comedy. Always searching for the next great snuggle, flavor or laugh, she inspires people to live their best life now. When not writing, Erika can be found at her local brewery dominating Harry Potter trivia night.

PT News PTandMe

PT News July 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout July 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

when your arm is a pain in the neck

1. When Your Arm is a Pain in the Neck
Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Many times, the initial discomfort results from nerves in the neck being pinched because the shoulder blade is not positioned correctly. Raising your arm above your head takes the stretch off the nerve and provides relief, but carrying something like a bag of groceries increases the stretch on the nerve, thus escalating the pain.  Read more

 

hydrate

2. Hydration During Exercise and Competition

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice throughout the PA’s Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

The fact that the body is made up of 60% water, and the brain 85%, makes water an essential nutrient for bodily function. Without adequate hydration, sports performance will be negatively affected, and serious illness, or death, can occur. Read more

 

rotator cuff exercises

3. 4 Exercises for Rotator Cuff Strength

Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with 3physical therapy locations in CT. 

This week, we will go over the rotator cuff anatomy, and provide you with 4 of our go-to exercises for strengthening the rotator cuff! Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

AEW Physical Therapy for athletes

PTandMe Goes Backstage with Ability at Fyter Fest and Fight for the Fallen

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

AEW Physical Therapy for athletes

You may have noticed that PTandMe is working with AEW, All Elite Wrestling, to provide physical therapy and athletic training services backstage to their athletes. Our talented physical therapy partners at Ability Rehabilitation have been on-site at their most recent Florida Events (Fyter Fest and Fight for the Fallen) and we wanted to catch up with some of the team, Jon and Sacsha to see how it went.

Q: What did you think of your first live AEW wrestling event? 

Ability – Sacsha (A-S):  I was completely impressed by the amount of planning and choreography it takes to wrestle

Ability – Jon (A-J):  It was a very unique experience for me; it was my first experience with professional wrestling, not just in sports medicine, but in general. There’s more to pro wrestling than I thought.

Q: Who were you most excited to see backstage? 

(A-S): JR!

Q: Which match was your favorite?

(A-J): I thoroughly enjoyed the first match at Fyter Fest. It featured Best Friends, SCU, and Private Party.

Q: What type of injuries did you see? 

(A-J): A lot of the injuries were chronic of the back and neck. It was mostly general soreness, tenderness, etc. of those regions. We also had some head injuries including a laceration on the top region of the head that needed 12 staples.

Q: What was most surprising to you about working ringside and backstage with AEW? 

(A-S):  How caring each wrestler/staff is towards another when an injury occurred.

Q: What advice would you give to wrestlers to prevent injury? 

(A-J):  Continue to stretch and foam roll routinely in your off-time and prior to workouts to limit the long term, lingering injuries. Also, watch out for barbed wire and chairs.

Q: What’s the biggest difference between working a high school football game and a pro wrestling event?

(A-S):  Based on this event I feel that football requires more preventative treatments such as taping, verses wrestling is busier after each fight for post-event treatment.

(A-J):  The crowd is much more into the sport than the average crowd of a high school football game, and the athletes were much more appreciative of the services than an average high school football player (probably due to maturity).

Q: Any other comments about your experience?

(A-S): Thank you so much for setting up this amazing opportunity to work with these talented wrestlers!

A huge THANK YOU!  goes out to both Ability Rehabilitation’s physical therapists and certified athletic trainers, as well as to All Elite Wrestling (AEW) for letting us take part in their athlete’s well-being backstage. If you are looking for a physical therapist for your team or sports injury we have over 500 locations to choose from in our Find A PT page.

physical therapy near me

More photos from these events can be found on our Instagram, Facebook and Twitter pages so make sure to like and follow PTandMe!

recumbent bikes

How Recumbent Bikes Can Help You with Physical Therapy

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

recumbent bikes

Recumbent bikes are fantastic pieces of gym equipment for rehabilitation and physical therapy. Their design and intent make them easy to use, with little strain on sore or injured joints, tendons, and ligaments. They also allow you to strengthen muscles during the process of recovering and after.

What is a Recumbent Bike?

A recumbent bike is a stationary bicycle that has a bucket seat. Instead of sitting directly over the pedals, the pedals are more forward centered on the machine. This makes it easier to use the bike, putting less strain on your knees, back, and hips, all while strengthening your muscles.

Recumbent bikes are seen in home gyms, fitness centers, and physical therapy rehabilitation facilities. Sometimes they are used simultaneously with a traditional upright pedal bike. However, they are typically used more as a graduated process, from a recumbent to a conventional bicycle.

Why are Recumbent Bikes Used in Physical Therapy?

Due to their design, recumbent bikes put less strain on your back, hips, and knees. When you are recovering from injury or surgery, the goal is to rehabilitate you back to the point you were before that event. Sometimes, depending on the circumstances, this can take considerable time. Starting slow is a good way of reducing the risk of hurting yourself, all while providing gentle exercises to regain lost muscle tone and strength.

While you can use a recumbent bike for strength training, they are more often used as a way to work the same muscle groups as an upright bike, but with less trauma to the joints. If you have arthritis or a tendon injury, a recumbent bike is a great starter bike to get you on the road to recover or, at least, be more active.

Recumbent bikes do provide a cardio workout with less strain on the heart. With a goal of increasing heart rate and blood circulation, you can still get a great cardio workout with less stress on your joints.

If you have balance issues, a recumbent bike is often recommended over an upright bike. For patients recovering from a stroke, they can get a cardio workout in, without the worry of falling off the bike. Since you are seated and can be seat-belted in for added safety, a recumbent bike is a good alternative.

Some physicians specifically write their orders that no upright bikes be used for the treatment of their patients. This is because an upright requires you to have a weight-bearing tolerance for standing and mounting the machine. With a good recumbent bike, you can move the seat to the side, and the patient can get on the bike with minimal stress. If they are recovering from back, hip, or knee issues, this is an important differentiating feature between the two types of bikes.

Can You Do Resistance Training on Recumbent Bike?

Yes, you can do resistance training on a recumbent bike. Depending on the model and style of the bike, there are various ways to increase the resistance. If you are rehabbing an injury, the amount of resistance you will want to use will be minimal, so that you don’t hurt yourself. However, you can increase the amount of resistance, giving you a great workout as you heal and progress.

If you are using a recumbent bike in a home gym, you can get a fantastic cardio workout without straining your back and hips.

Recumbent bikes are a great tool in the physical therapy realm. They are also extremely beneficial for home and fitness gyms where you may have some limitations but still desire a great cardio workout.

Please consult your healthcare provider before starting an exercise program. For help finding a workout that fits your lifestyle and ability levels don’t hesitate to call your physical therapist. They have the expertise and skills needed to help keep you active and safely avoid injuries during sports and exercise.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News June 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. 8 Great Pelvic Floor Stretches to Do During Pregnancy
Written by Ability Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout Orlando and Tampa Bay.

retching and strengthening your pelvic floor muscles during pregnancy can help relieve your aches and pains — and alleviate stress and tension too. Pelvic floor stretches will also help you have an easier delivery and decrease your risk of urinary incontinence later on.  Read more

 

get active square

2. Get Active to Stay Active

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, a privately owned, outpatient physical therapy practice throughout Central Oregon.

Summer is a time to have fun and spend time outdoors. It is an opportunity to enjoy the sunshine. It’s a time when you can go out for a walk and roll down the windows and take in everything that nature has to offer, allergies and all. Read more

 

3. For Shoulder Relief Try These Home Remedies

Written by Sport and Spine Physical Therapy with 4 physical therapy locations in Southern, WI.

Shoulder pain can be one of the most disabling problems to deal with. Whether you realize it or not, you use your shoulder pretty frequently throughout most days, as it permits practically any movement that involves your arms. Read more

Periodization Weight Training

A Guide to Periodization with Weight Training

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Periodization Weight Training

Periodization is an important technique utilized with training in order to maximize gains, whether it be through increased aerobic performance, speed, and strength. This guide outlines simple tips customizing training programs to prevent plateauing with training and improve performance. By no means is this an exhaustive guide, or an end all be all in regards to what specific exercises to perform to improve function or performance. For specifics on what exercises to perform, this depends on what goals you seek to achieve and physical characteristics, which can be outlined by a physical therapist or certified strength and conditioning coach.

1. Strength, endurance, hypertrophy, power continuing and rest

The amount of resistance, number of repetitions, and speed the exercises are performed all have an impact on how the body will respond to training. Proper training requires proper rest between sets to maximize the effect of whatever you are trying to accomplish. For a rough and dirty guide on training loads and adaptations, use the following:

weight training


Brute Strength
100% of Max (1-5 Reps)
In this range, gains are made more from neuromuscular adaptations with little effect on muscle fiber size.
REST: When training for maximum strength or power, rest for 3— 5 minutes between sets.

 

weight training


Power Training (High Velocity)
80-90% of Max (1-3 Reps)
At a high velocity to promote endurance and power.
REST: When training for maximum strength or power, rest for 3— 5 minutes between sets.

 

weight lifting


Strength and Mass
76-82% of Max (6-8 Reps)
This range still heavily taxes the neuromuscular system but provides a high enough volume to help elicit gains in muscle mass.
REST: When training for strength, utilize a rest scheme of 2— 3 minutes between sets.

 

weight lifting


Mass
68-74% of Max (9-12 Reps)
This range is the best for providing a high enough volume to elicit large gains in muscle mass, but not enough of a stimulus to cause as great of a strength gain as high resistances.
REST: When training to maximize muscle mass, utilize a rest scheme of 60— 90 seconds between sets.

Endurance Training
13+ REPETITIONS- These rep ranges do a better job at promoting muscular endurance, but do not have a high enough intensity to elicit large changes in muscle mass.
REST: When training for endurance, utilize a rest scheme of 30— 45 seconds between each sent.

*Note the above information is applicable to multi-joint movements like squats and deadlifts. Single joint movements, such as bicep curls, can typically be done for a greater number of repetitions at any percentage of an individual’s given maximum, and so, will need to be assessed accordingly when developing a training program.

2. Training Cycles

Training cycles are an organized way to design a training program to meet a specific over-arching goal. This consists of macrocycles, mesocycles, and microcycles.

weight training cycle

3. Progressive vs. an Undulating Program

Progressive programs revolve around a systematic increase in volume, intensity, or both in a given cycle while an undulating program utilizes a randomized progression within a cycle, in which the volume, intensity, or both can vary daily, weekly, or monthly. Neither progression displays a significant superiority over one another in regards to peak performance. However, some suggest that undulating programs carry a smaller risk of overtraining. In reality, the utilization of both progression techniques allows progression and reduces the risk of overtraining while reducing the risk of plateauing.

Putting it all together (Example: 3 Month Training Progression)

Month 1- Capacity Building
Higher rep range to help the body become accustomed to training. Utilizing a combination of periodization an undulation in a month progression:

Example:

  • wk 1— 4 sets of 13—15 reps at 55% — 60%;
  • wk 2— 4 sets of 11—13 reps at 64%—70%;
  • wk 3— 4 sets of 10—12 reps at 68%—72%;
  • wk 4— 4 sets of 10—12 at 60% — 64%

Each week the rep ranges decreased with increasing resistance until week 4. The 1st 3 weeks utilize a linear progression in order to increase the body’s ability to handle a given training volume, but week 4 acts as a deloading week. This takes the undulating approach into account to alter load parameters to allow for recovery within a training cycle in order to reduce the risk of overtraining.  Another important note, the higher the resistance, the lower the number of repetitions performed.

Month 2- Hypertrophy Phase
Utilize a weight that is challenging for 9 to 12 repetitions with eventually progressing to 8 to 10 repetitions utilizing progressive system detailed in month 1.

Example:

  • wk 1— 10 to 12 reps at 68%— 72%
  • wk 2— 9 to 11 reps at 70%— 74%
  • wk 3— 8 to 10 reps at 72%— 76%
  • wk 4— sets of 8 at 64%— 70%

 

Month 3- Strength Phase
Utilizing resistance that is challenging for 6 to 8 reps and eventually progressing to a resistance that only allows for performing 4 to 6 reps.

Example:

  • wk 1— 6 to 8 reps at 76%— 82%
  • wk 2— 5 to 7 reps at 78%— 85%
  • wk 3— 4 to 6 reps at 82%— 88%
  • wk 4 sets of 5 to 8 at 70%— 75%

This would training progression could be used a stand-alone training progression, or as part of a more comprehensive training program. The three-month block could act as a mesocycle for a larger training program with each month acting as a microcycle to address short term goals.

*Note this is by no means an exhaustive list, nor is this a specific training progression for different sports. This is just an example of how the different concepts are written in this paperwork together in a training progression.

physical therapy near me

This article was written by Rehab Associates of Northern Virginia. Rehab Associates of Central Virginia is an outpatient physical therapy clinic that focuses on putting the patient’s needs first. Their physical therapists have advanced degrees in specialty orthopedic care from head to toe.