Category Archives: Sports and Fitness

Holiday Exercise Routine

Add Some Holiday Fun to Your Exercise Routine

Holiday Exercise Routine

The majority of adults in the United States are not physically active on a regular basis. Only 30% get the recommended amount of physical activity. Lack of time is the most often cited reason for not getting in enough exercise. When the holiday season begins, the lack of time issue only becomes more problematic. For most people, even for those who do exercise regularly, this means that daily exercise slips to the bottom of the long list of things to do during the holidays. You know that list: gift shopping, party hopping, and traveling to see family and friends. Take some time to figure out what you can and can’t control. Then, work on the elements you can control to help with your time management. Here are some ways you can stay on track and have some fun with your exercise routine throughout the holidays.

Find a Holiday Race to Join
Knowing you need to be physically prepared may be the motivational tool you need in terms of keeping you consistent with your workouts. Realizing that all your training will have an additional benefit, other than improved fitness, may also improve your chances of sticking with it. Most holiday-themed races have opportunities to dress up adding even more fun to the mix!

Find or Create the Perfect Holiday Workout Playlist
It’s hard not to love Mariah Carey’s all I want for Christmas is you – it’s also a great song to workout to.  Are you a Spotify user? Try this playlist during your next workout. Is iTunes your jam? They have a holiday classics remix playlist that’s perfect for a holiday workout.

Get a Workout Partner
Some people find that working out with a partner helps motivate them and keep them consistent in terms of getting to the gym or hitting the pavement. Knowing that someone is waiting for you can motivate you on the days you don’t feel like getting out of bed to exercise. Find someone with a similar schedule and treat yourselves after your workouts – Grab a cup of coffee together or plan a trip to a holiday market afterward. You’ll feel great, and be able to check some things off of your to-do list!

Set Some Holiday Related Goals
Rather than dragging yourself to the gym each day to shed those extra holiday pounds, set a fitness goal for the holiday season.

Try writing down what you want to accomplish during the two-month period from November 20 to January 20. Choose a goal such as losing 5 pounds, increasing your strength, or improving your time in a mile run. Don’t make exercise a penance for the holiday cookies you ate. Make it a personal goal unrelated to holiday revelry. Your goals need to be flexible and in line with your capabilities, needs, values, and available resources. They should be challenging, but also realistic. Measure the baseline of where you are now and decide where you would like to be on a certain date in January.

Have fun this holiday season and add some cheer to your regular workout routine. Mixing it up will keep your routine fun, fresh, and will be something you can more easily stick to. Getting started on a new workout routine? We have some great tips to help you get started safely. Need help with an injury so that you can get back to your exercise routine? Look no further. We have wonderful teams of therapists throughout the country that specialize in sports rehabilitation.

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REFERENCES:
2020 physical activity guidelines for Americans. US Department of Health and Human Services website. Available at: https://health.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf  Accessed November 17, 2020.

The Surgeon General’s call to action to prevent and decrease overweight and obesity. US Department of Health and Human Services’ Surgeon General website. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44206. Accessed November 17, 2020.

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PT News September 2022

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout September 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Diastasis Recti

1. How Can I Heal My Diastasis Recti? 

Written by JACO Rehabilitation with 4 locations in Oahu

Have you ever been told by a doctor or healthcare provider that you have separation of your abdominal muscles? This condition is known as diastasis rectus abdominis (DRA), or diastasis recti. Diastasis recti is a condition in which the connective tissue in the center of your abdominal muscles, the linea alba, becomes overstretched or torn. You may be able to see a visible dip or bulge in the center of the abdominal region when trying to perform abdominal exercises.  Read more

 

FCE

2. What are Functional Capacity Evaluations (FCEs) for Employers?

Written by ARC Physical Therapy+ an outpatient physical therapy practice with over 25 locations in Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas.

FCEs help determine a patient’s physical capacity and ability to safely return to work after a work-related injury or extended medical leave. These are evidenced-based and legally defensible XRTS tests that provide safe return-to-work recommendations. ARC Physical Therapy+ performs these evaluations to help employers decrease lost time and prevent future injuries. Read more

 

Mountain Biking

3. Mountain Biking Tips to Keep You Riding

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group located throughout Greater Bend, OR.

Central Oregon is a phenomenal region to explore on a mountain bike. We have an expansive trail network, fantastic weather, and a large cycling community that is excited to adventure with other riders. While this sport is incredible, there is the risk of injury just like there is when participating in other sports. This risk of injury is present regardless of if you are a novice vs. expert rider or seek cross-country trails vs. downhill trails.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News September 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News August 2022

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout August 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

What is Osgood-Schlatters

1. Osgood-Schlatters & Strickland Protocol 

Written by Horizon Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine with 3 locations in South Carolina

Osgood-Schlatters is commonly found in children going through their middle school years. As the child goes through a “growth-spurt”, they may be experiencing pain just below the knee. Their bones are growing faster than their muscles can adapt so the tension on the muscle can often pull at the bone causing pain.  Read more

 

Osteoarthritis

2. Suffering from Osteoarthritis? Movement is Medicine!

Written by Life Fitness Physical Therapy an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout greater Baltimore.

Okay, so you have OA- now what? The good news is that there are many interventions that can help you manage your OA so that you can live a healthy, pain-free, and active life. One of the most beneficial interventions for osteoarthritis is physical therapy! While we physical therapists cannot wave a magic wand and make your OA disappear (unfortunately!), there are still many different things that we can do to help manage your symptoms. Read more

 

better understand concussions

3. How to Better Understand Concussions

Written by Sports Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations in Bellevue, Factoria, Kirkland, Everett, and Lake Stevens, WA.

Concussions can and do happen to anyone, so it is crucial to recognize the signs and take proper precautions. In a definition provided by the CDC, a concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to move inside the skull. Even a ding, getting your bell rung, or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head is serious.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News August 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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concussion baseline testing

Post Concussion Recovery: Why Baseline Testing is Important

Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussions are serious

Medical providers may describe a concussion as a “mild” brain injury because concussions are usually not life-threatening. Even so, the effects of a concussion can be serious.

Once an athlete has been suspected of having a concussion… when is it safe to go back to play? The answer is different for everyone, but there are few baseline tests that medical professionals can administer to make sure that a gradual return to play, work and activity is safe and won’t lead to further damage.

When an athlete has a concussion, it’s important to know how much their functional and cognitive abilities have been affected. With a baseline test you give medical professionals an accurate starting point to correctly evaluate the impact of the injury.

FAQs about Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussion baseline testing is a pre-season exam conducted by a trained health care professional. Baseline tests are used to assess an athlete’s balance and brain function (including learning and memory skills, ability to pay attention or concentrate, and how quickly he or she thinks and solve problems), as well as for the presence of any concussion symptoms. Results from baseline tests (or pre-injury tests) can be used and compared to a similar exam conducted by a health care professional during the season if an athlete has a suspected concussion.

Baseline testing generally takes place during the pre-season—ideally prior to the first practice. It is important to note that some baseline and concussion assessment tools are only suggested for use among athletes ages 10 years and older.

How is baseline testing information used if an athlete has a suspected concussion?

Results from baseline testing can be used if an athlete has a suspected concussion. Comparing post-injury test results to baseline test results can assist health care professionals in identifying the effects of the injury and making more informed return to school and play decisions.

Education should always be provided to athletes and parents if an athlete has a suspected concussion. This should include information on safely returning to school and play, tips to aid in recovery (such as rest), danger signs and when to seek immediate care, and how to help reduce an athlete’s risk for a future concussion.

What should be included as part of baseline testing?

Baseline testing should include a check for concussion symptoms, as well as balance and cognitive (such as concentration and memory) assessments. Computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be included as a piece of an overall baseline test to assess an athlete’s concentration, memory, and reaction time.

During the baseline pre-season test, health care professionals should also assess for a prior history of concussion (including symptoms experienced and length of recovery from the injury). It is also important to record other medical conditions that could impact recovery after concussion, such as a history of migraines, depression, mood disorders, or anxiety, as well as learning disabilities and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Baseline testing also provides an important opportunity to educate athletes and others about concussion and return to school and play protocol.

Who should administer baseline tests?

Baseline tests should only be conducted by a trained health care professional such as a physician, physical therapist or trained ATC.

Who should interpret baseline tests?

Only a trained health care professional with experience in concussion management should interpret the results of a baseline exam. When possible, ideally a neuropsychologist should interpret the computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological test components of a baseline exam. Results of neuropsychological tests should not be used as a stand-alone diagnostic tool, but should serve as one component used by health care professionals to make a return to school and play decisions.

How often should an athlete undergo concussion baseline testing?

If baseline testing is used, research suggests that most components of baseline testing be repeated annually to establish a valid test result for comparison. Baseline computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be repeated every 2 years. However, more frequent neuropsychological testing may be needed if an athlete has sustained a concussion or if the athlete has a medical condition that could affect the results of the test.

Many physical therapy clinics have therapists that have been trained in baseline testing software and techniques. Physical therapists can also specialize in return to sports programs for athletes that have experienced concussions.  The decision of when you go back to your sport can be a critical one… especially if you go back to soon. Prevent this by having an accurate baseline available for your healthcare professionals.

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more information can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/

Additional articles from PTandMe about concussions can be found here:

concussion physical therapy   

concussion treatment   

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PT News July 2022

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout July 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Pre Workout Nutrition

1. Pre-Workout Nutrition for Optimal Performance 

Written by The Jackson Clinics with locations throughout Northern Virginia.

When we work out, our bodies require fuel to support energy production within the muscle tissues. Unsurprisingly, the food we eat directly supports these bioenergetic pathways! Proper pre-workout nutrition can greatly boost your performance while delaying fatigue and soreness. However, there are a few important considerations, including what, when, and how much to eat or drink, to get the most out of your pre-workout fueling.   Read more

 

Physical Therapy

2. Did you Know Physical Therapy Can Alleviate Pain and Discomfort?

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout the Columbus, Ohio Area.

When you wake up in the morning, do you feel achy? While aches and pains are common from time to time, waking up every morning with them can indicate a more serious problem. We’ll get to the source of your issue to help you find relief, so you may wake up feeling refreshed in the mornings! Read more

 

3. Arthritis. Does Physical Therapy Help?

Written by Mission Physical Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout San Antonio, TX.

According to the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, 20.7% of Bexar County residents have been diagnosed with Arthritis. With over 100 forms of arthritis, there is understandable confusion about the different forms of arthritis and the treatment options for each. Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent, while Rheumatoid arthritis is the most disabling. Those with arthritis do not have to live in pain, as there are treatment options beyond medication and surgery available   Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News July 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Hot Weather Exercise Tips

Hot Weather Exercise Tips

Hot Weather Exercise Tips

As the temperatures continue to rise, we have decided to put together a few hot weather exercise tips to consider while staying active and for staying hydrated through the summer.

Set your alarm: Sunrise is generally the coolest time of day, so get up and get out early. It may be more humid, but it is generally still hot at sunset because the ground radiates accumulated heat.

Hydrate: It is recommended to drink at least eight ounces of liquids prior to heading outside to exercise and 6-8 ounces of fluids every 15 minutes, switching between water and an electrolyte drink. Remember to drink plenty of fluids post-exercise to speed recovery.

  • Remember to drink water and other fluids throughout the day. Carry a water bottle with you or grab a drink each time you pass a water fountain.
  • Drink 16oz of fluid 2-3 hours before exercise
  • Drink an additional 10oz of fluid 10-20 minutes before exercise
  • Consume 20-40oz of fluid for every hour of exercise
  • Always have water available. Take a bottle to work, the gym or wherever you are headed, and remember to use it.
  • Drink up any time you are in the sun. Just being outside can lead to dehydration
  • Children and the elderly are more susceptible to dehydration
  • Finally don’t rely on thirst as a signal to drink water. Thirst is actually a sign that the body is under stress and by the time you feel thirsty, dehydration has already begun to set in. Other symptoms of dehydration include dry mouth, irritability, headache, weakness, dizziness, cramps, nausea, and fatigue. Even mild dehydration can lead to diminished performance, the elevation of core body temperature, and increased cardiovascular strain.

Acclimatize: It is advisable to gradually build up your tolerance for exercising in warmer conditions

Wear Technical Fabrics: Technical fabrics wick sweat from your body to keep you cool. Also, wear a visor to keep the sun out of your eyes, not a hat, which traps the heat.

Slow Down: For every 5-degree rise in temperature above 60 degrees F, slow down your activity intensity by 5%

Protect: Use sunscreen to protect your skin and prevent sunburn.

Be realistic: Do not overestimate your level of physical fitness; set realistic exercise goals.

What happens if I feel pain after a workout?

Keep in mind that even when you follow these hot weather exercise tips, some discomfort and muscle soreness is to be expected. If your pain does not resolve within a few days, that is when it’s time to ask for help. Your body may be able to accommodate your pain for a short period, but if left alone, you may begin to experience weakness, a lack of flexibility, and even additional injury if your body moves to avoid the pain by overcompensating with other muscle groups. The sooner you ask for help the better. During your physical therapy first visit, we will evaluate your injury and from there we can:

  • Alleviate pain
  • Correct improper movement patterns
  • Correct muscle imbalances through flexibility and strength training
  • Modify training when possible
  • Educate you about faulty or improper posture or body mechanics with training

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PT News June 2022

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Rotator Cuff Prevents Shoulder Pain

1. How Your Rotator Cuff Prevents Shoulder Pain

Written by Advance Rehabilitation with locations throughout Georgia.

You don’t know what happened. You were just playing catch with your child and you just threw “too hard” and the next day your shoulder hurt. Or maybe you were out cutting tree branches and the next morning you could barely raise your arm. How about you just woke up and had a pain in the shoulder that just did not go away or even got worse the more you used that arm. You decide to see your family physician and you hear the words “Your pain is coming from your rotator cuff.” You think “Great! But what is a rotator cuff and why is it hurting my shoulder?”   Read more

 

Hiking Advice

2. A Physical Therapist’s Hiking Advice

Written by Carolina Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout South Carolina.

My husband and I spend an amazing weekend at Yosemite National Park in California last year. We are not avid hikers, but we could not resist going on multiple hikes when we were there. We decided to go on a very long hike, Upper Yosemite Falls. It is over a 7-mile round trip with over 2500 elevation gain. We did some research before the hike to see what all we need to survive that hike. Read more

 

Low Back Pain Physical Therapy

3. Balance Training to Help Prevent Lateral Ankle Sprains

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, MI.

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in the United States with approximately 28,000 occurring per day (Kaminski et al., 2013). Ankle sprains are estimated to make up 45% of all athletic injuries. As an athletic trainer in the secondary school setting, these seem to occur on a weekly basis. Due in part to some quarantine boredom in mid-2020, balance training was a solution found by way of a 16-year-old research study.   Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News June 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Use Exercise to Help Improve Your Posture

How to Use Exercise to Help Improve Your Posture

Use Exercise to Help Improve Your Posture

Poor posture is sometimes inevitable. With many people working jobs that require long periods of sitting, the tension in our muscles isn’t uncommon. Aside from this, poor posture can also be caused by general muscle weakness, technology use, injury, stress, and even genetics.

Failing to correct your posture can ultimately lead to increased health issues—like frequent headaches, spinal dysfunction, difficulty breathing, and indigestion. Good posture can help us breathe easier, digest food more efficiently, and help us feel more confident.

Keep reading to find out how you can easily improve your posture through exercise.

4 Exercises to Try To Correct Poor Posture

To correct your posture, grab your workout clothes, open space, and some water to perform these exercises to help build your core and back muscles, lengthen your spine and stretch your body.

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1. Cat and Cow Pose

Not only does the cat and cow pose help improve your posture, it can also help relieve stress, calm the mind and improve coordination.

Here’s how:

  • Start on all fours.
  • Get into cat position by curling your shoulders downward and pushing your hips toward the ground to curve your back upward.
  • Then, get into cow position by pushing your hips upward and your stomach toward the ground.
  • Alternate between cat and cow post for one minute.

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2. Pigeon Pose

If you tend to sit for long periods of time, your body will naturally build up tension in your back and hips. Pigeon pose is excellent to combat this as it helps open up your hip flexors and lower back muscles. A bonus: it also helps increase your flexibility and supports healthy digestion.

Here’s how:

  • Begin in a downward-facing dog.
  • Bring your right foot forward into a lunge position.
  • Bring your right shin down to the ground, perpendicular to your body.
  • Bring your left leg down flat on the ground.
  • Hold the stretch for one minute, then repeat on the opposite leg.

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3. Side Plank

Side planks help strengthen your core without putting too much stress and pressure on your lower back—the perfect move for correcting poor posture.

Here’s how:

  • Lie on your side with your elbow on the ground under your shoulder to support your body.
  • Push your hips and knees off of the ground.
  • Hold this position for 10-30 seconds or longer if you’re comfortable, then repeat on the other side.

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4. Crunches

Crunches are one of the most popular exercises for improving core strength needed for good posture, but they also help increase the mobility and flexibility of this muscle group.

Here’s how:

  • Lie on your back with your feet on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
  • Cross your arms over your chest or place them at your side.
  • Sit up to engage your core muscles, then lie back down.
  • Repeat for 4 sets of 10 to 20 reps.

Incorporating these simple yet effective exercises into your daily routine can help you stand up straight in no time. For more workouts, you can do to improve your posture, check out the infographic below.

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golf stretches

Dynamic Golf Stretches

DynamicGolf_FBsize

Golf requires strength, flexibility, endurance, and power to create pain-free movement and improve your game. The most common golf injury is low back pain followed by shoulder pain and knee pain. A physical therapist can assist you in improving your pain and correcting your body’s deficits.  These golf stretches will make your golf game less painful and reduce those extra strokes:

hamstring stretch

Hamstring Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

back extension stretch

Back Extension Stretch
(hold club backwards overhead, repeat 10x)

hip back shoulder rotation

Hip/Back/Shoulder Rotation Stretch
(hold club behind back and rotate torso to each side 10x)

calf stretch

Calf Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

lumbar rotation 1

lumbar rotation 2

Lumbar Spine Rotation
(hold club, plant feet as shown, rotate to each side 10x)

forearm rotation 1

forearm rotation 2

forearm rotation 3

Forearm Rotation
(hold club straight up, then rotate to each side 10x)

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This information was written by Mishock Physical Therapy and Associates, a privately-owned, outpatient physical therapy practice operating in southeast Pennsylvania. They actively participate in the community by providing services to schools, retirement communities, and local businesses. Their mission is to provide the most efficacious, state-of-the-art physical therapy services to relieve pain, restore function and return you to the highest quality of life possible. For more information click here.

common running injuries

Common Running Injuries

Physical therapy for runners
Running can be great for your health, but if an injury occurs never be afraid to seek help. The best treatment for injuries for runners is early management and education on self-care specific to the injury. We’ve compiled a list of common running injuries below. If you are experiencing lasting pain that affects your ability to complete your run or activities throughout your day, don’t modify your behavior – talk to your physical therapist.

IT (Iliotibial) Band Syndrome

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Usually occurs after a short period of running with sharp pain on the outside of the knee

For more information click here

Piriformis Syndrome

  • Common Causes: Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly, Poor running mechanics, Usually associated with weak hips and core.
  • Symptoms: Local pain and tightness in the buttock with possible tingling or numbness down the back of the leg. Most noted during prolonged sitting.

Shin Splints

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Lack of flexibility in calves, running on hard surfaces
  • Symptoms: Throbbing or aching pain along the front of the shin. Usually occurs during and/or following a prolonged run or walk.

For more information click here

Plantar Fasciitis

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Change in running surface, Calf tightness, increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Deep ache and/or sharp pain in the bottom of the heel. Most commonly felt in the morning or following prolonged sitting

For more information click here

Runner’s Knee

  • Common Causes: Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly, Poor running mechanics
  • Symptoms: Swelling, Aching pain behind and/ or around the kneecap, pain walking up and/or downstairs

Achilles Tendinitis

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Swelling, painful to the touch, lack of flexibility along the back of the lower leg close to the heel.

For more information click here