Category Archives: Sports and Fitness

exercise tips

Exercise Tips to Get You Moving

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Becoming physically active requires a conscious effort for most adults. Develop an exercise program to fit your individual goals. Be sure to consider ways to increase your activity levels throughout the day. Every little bit helps! If you find it too challenging to fit 30 minutes of activity into your day, break it up into 10 to 15-minute intervals and accumulate your activity throughout the day.

Exercise Tips to Activate your lifestyle.

Challenge yourself to move more! Find ways to become more active in your daily living. For example, you can:

  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator.
  • Take a 10-minute stretch or walk break at work.
  • Turn on the music and vacuum.
  • Wash your own car – and your neighbor’s too.
  • Do strength-training exercises in front of the TV
  • Park in the furthest parking space and walk.

Make Fitness fun!

The secret to a successful fitness program is enjoyment! Choose physical activities that you enjoy doing. This could mean walking, playing tennis, biking or joining a team sport.

  • Consider trying something different, such as yoga or kickboxing.
  • Coach a youth sports team – your rewards will be many.
  • Enter a race – it will motivate you.
  • Plant a garden and share its beauty and bounty.
  • Make Sunday walks or hikes a weekly tradition.
  • Set up a morning walking or biking club; exercise buddies can help you be honest.

Anticipate the unexpected.

Lousy weather, travel (both business and pleasure) and the ups and downs of daily life can play havoc with your best-laid fitness plan. Always have a backup plan. If it is raining have an indoor activity to do, If you are taking a trip, throw in your walking shoes or a jump rope and fit in exercise when you can.

In addition to being stronger and more fit, aerobic exercise has so many health benefits. If you need help getting started or need some motivation to contact your physical therapist. They can work with you to create an exercise plan that works for you and your ability levels. You are never too old to be more active!

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PT News December 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

nutrition strategies

1. Effective Nutrition Strategies

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout greater Grand Rapids, MI.

How do you stay on target with eating healthy and being active? Between work schedules, kid’s schedules, appointments, and change of plans, finding time to exercise and eat right can sometimes feel impossible. Read more

 

crossfit

2. Is Crossfit Right For You?

Written by Riverview Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations in Southern Maine. 

CrossFit is no longer a form of exercise performed in small gyms; it is a phenomenon that has taken the world by storm. At its roots, CrossFit is a popular form of exercise utilizing high-intensity fitness programming that incorporates elements from many disciplines: including weightlifting, traditional cardiovascular exercise (running, jumping rope, biking, rowing), and basic gymnastic movements. Read more

 

lymphedema physical therapy

3. Lymphedema Therapy – You Don’t Have to Live with Chronic Swelling

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties in PA.

One cause of chronic swelling could be lymphedema. This is a condition where swelling occurs in the extremities due to a compromised or damaged lymph system. Lymph is the fluid that bathes the cells with needed nutrients, oxygen, and white blood cells provided by the circulatory system.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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cold weather exercise tips

Cold Weather Exercise Tips: Running Safety

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Cold temperatures and decreasing daylight hours do not mean that your outdoor running routine has to go into hibernation for the winter. Running through the cold weather can ease the winter doldrums, improve your energy level and help you to be in better shape for the spring/summer. However, it is important to follow our PTandMe cold-weather exercise tips to run safely and comfortably through wintry weather.

  • Pay attention to temperature and wind chill: If the temperature drops below zero F or the wind chill is below -20F, you should hit the treadmill.
  • Protect your hands and feet: It is estimated that as much as 30% of your body heat escapes through your hands and feet.
  • Dress in layers: It is important to start with a thin layer of synthetic material such as polypropylene, which wicks sweat away from your body. stay away from cotton as a base layer as it holds moisture and will keep you wet. If it is really cold out, you will need a middle layer, such as polar fleece for added insulation.
  • Avoid overdressing: You should feel a slight chill off your body the first 5 minutes of winter running; after that, you should warm-up.
  • Protect your head: It is estimated that 40% of body heat is lost through your head. Wearing a hat that will help prevent heat loss is very important.
  • Do not stay in wet clothes: If you get wet from rain, snow or even from sweat in chilly temperatures, you are at risk for hypothermia. It is important that you change wet clothing immediately and get to warm shelter as quickly as possible.
  • Stay hydrated: Despite the cool weather, you will still heat up and loos fluids through sweat. The cool air also has a drying effect, which can increase the risk of dehydration. Make sure you drink water or sports drinks before, during and after you run.
  • Remember sunscreen: Sunburn is still possible in the winter. It is also important to protect your lips with lip balm.
  • Take it easy when it is frigid: The colder the temperature becomes, the greater your risk for a pulled muscle when running in the cold, so warm up slowly and run easy on very cold days.
  • Run in the wind: If at all possible, head out into the wind, so that on your return run, the wind will be at your back when you are sweaty and could catch a chill.

Looking for help with a nagging injury? Find a physical therapist near you.

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For more cold-weather exercise tips to keep you safe this winter check out the articles below!

Staying Warm in Winter PTandMe  Winter Safety PTandMe  Snow Shoveling Safety PTandMe

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PT News November 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

low back pain

1. Low Back Pain – A Powerful Guide

Written by Wright Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout the heart of the Magic Valley, Boise and Eastern Idaho.

Daily, we see patients who are concerned about the course they should take to heal their back pain.  Our aim with these individuals is to utilize a skilled classification system and evidence-based treatments to aid in identification and treatment of Low Back Pain (LBP). Read more

 

Snow Shoveling

2. Prevent Low Back Pain While Shoveling Snow

Written by Rehab Associates of Central Virginia, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Central VA. 

As I was shoveling the snow off my driveway this week, I quickly realized that I needed to adjust my technique or I was going to pay for it later. Injury can result from repetitive movements with a general lack of awareness and variability in movement and may be prevented with some easy steps. Read more

 

physical therapy

3. Relieving Your Pain the Natural Way – Physical Therapy as the Safer Relief Alternative

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Columbus, OH.

It is no secret that the United States is a country with very high levels of medication. It is also a common practice for physicians to prescribe heavier pain relievers, such as the opioids that have resulted in a country-wide epidemic. While the effects of these drugs can be frightening, there is a safer solution available: physical therapy.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News October 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout October 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

sport specialization

1. Sports Specialization Vs. Sports Diversification in Youth Athletes

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout greater Grand Rapids.

Early specialization in one sport has become a trend in youth athletes across the country. This shift is one that has young athletes training year round to develop a specialized skill be able to play at the highest level of competition. Read more

 

food is fuel

2. Food is Your Fuel

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout greater Bend, OR. 

Truth: we are not nutritionists. That said, after a bit of trial and error and working with patients and various health professionals, we have picked up on these and common do’s and dont’s. Lindsey Hagen, PT, and healthy running nut discusses the importance of balance in your diet and making sure you do what is best for your body, as they say, “You do you…” Read more

 

walking up stairs

3. Climbing Stairs – One Step at a Time

Written by The Jackson Clinics an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations across Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa

Although going up the stairs may feel challenging, some people experience more pain going down. This is because your muscles have to work hard to control your weight as you descend. If you have suffered from knee problems in the past or continue to have problems, it is probably time to look at increasing strength to make navigating stairs less difficult. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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concussion baseline testing

Post Concussion Recovery: Why Baseline Testing is Important

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Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussions are serious

Medical providers may describe a concussion as a “mild” brain injury because concussions are usually not life-threatening. Even so, the effects of a concussion can be serious.

Once an athlete has been suspected of having a concussion… when is it safe to go back to play? The answer is different for everyone, but there are few baseline tests that medical professionals can administer to make sure that a gradual return to play, work and activity is safe and won’t lead to further damage.

When an athlete has a concussion, it’s important to know how much their functional and cognitive abilities have been affected. With a baseline test you give medical professionals an accurate starting point to correctly evaluate the impact of the injury.

FAQs about Concussion Baseline Testing

Concussion baseline testing is a pre-season exam conducted by a trained health care professional. Baseline tests are used to assess an athlete’s balance and brain function (including learning and memory skills, ability to pay attention or concentrate, and how quickly he or she thinks and solve problems), as well as for the presence of any concussion symptoms. Results from baseline tests (or pre-injury tests) can be used and compared to a similar exam conducted by a health care professional during the season if an athlete has a suspected concussion.

Baseline testing generally takes place during the pre-season—ideally prior to the first practice. It is important to note that some baseline and concussion assessment tools are only suggested for use among athletes ages 10 years and older.

How is baseline testing information used if an athlete has a suspected concussion?

Results from baseline testing can be used if an athlete has a suspected concussion. Comparing post-injury test results to baseline test results can assist health care professionals in identifying the effects of the injury and making more informed return to school and play decisions.

Education should always be provided to athletes and parents if an athlete has a suspected concussion. This should include information on safely returning to school and play, tips to aid in recovery (such as rest), danger signs and when to seek immediate care, and how to help reduce an athlete’s risk for a future concussion.

What should be included as part of baseline testing?

Baseline testing should include a check for concussion symptoms, as well as balance and cognitive (such as concentration and memory) assessments. Computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be included as a piece of an overall baseline test to assess an athlete’s concentration, memory, and reaction time.

During the baseline pre-season test, health care professionals should also assess for a prior history of concussion (including symptoms experienced and length of recovery from the injury). It is also important to record other medical conditions that could impact recovery after concussion, such as a history of migraines, depression, mood disorders, or anxiety, as well as learning disabilities and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Baseline testing also provides an important opportunity to educate athletes and others about concussion and return to school and play protocol.

Who should administer baseline tests?

Baseline tests should only be conducted by a trained health care professional such as a physician, physical therapist or trained ATC.

Who should interpret baseline tests?

Only a trained health care professional with experience in concussion management should interpret the results of a baseline exam. When possible, ideally a neuropsychologist should interpret the computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological test components of a baseline exam. Results of neuropsychological tests should not be used as a stand-alone diagnostic tool, but should serve as one component used by health care professionals to make a return to school and play decisions.

How often should an athlete undergo concussion baseline testing?

If baseline testing is used, research suggests that most components of baseline testing be repeated annually to establish a valid test result for comparison. Baseline computerized or paper-pencil neuropsychological tests may be repeated every 2 years. However, more frequent neuropsychological testing may be needed if an athlete has sustained a concussion or if the athlete has a medical condition that could affect the results of the test.

Many physical therapy clinics have therapists that have been trained in baseline testing software and techniques. Physical therapists can also specialize in return to sports programs for athletes that have experienced concussions.  The decision of when you go back to your sport can be a critical one… especially if you go back to soon. Prevent this by having an accurate baseline available for your healthcare professionals.

Need Physical Therapy? Find a PT Near You!

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more information can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/

Additional articles from PTandMe about concussions can be found here:

concussion physical therapy   

concussion treatment   

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PT News August 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout August 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Physical Therapy Direct Access

1. Physical Therapy Direct Access is Coming to Texas
Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Starting September 1, 2019, it will be easier to get Physical Therapy in Texas, thanks to local San Antonio State Representative, Ina Minjarez (D) who drafted HB29, a handful of other State Reps who co-sponsored the bill, the Texas Medical Association, and the Texas Orthopedic Association.  Read more

 

House workout

2. Get Your Housework(Out) Done!

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR and the surrounding communities. 

Let’s get honest for a second though and realize not all moments are adventure packed (at least for your average community member). Here are some fantastic ways to make even the down time productive and moving you in a healthy direction… and you get the chores done! Read more

 

AEW Ability Rehab

3. Ability Rehabilitation Played Key Role at AEW’s Two Florida Based Events

Written by Ability Rehabilitation an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Tampa and Orlando.

Florida-based Ability Health Services & Rehabilitation worked closely with All Elite Wrestling (AEW) to provide athletic training and physical therapy care to the wrestlers at the recent FYTER FEST and FIGHT FOR THE FALLEN events, which both took place last month in Daytona Beach and Jacksonville, respectively. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Game Day Nutrition

What to Eat Before, During, & After a Game

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Game Day Nutrition

What athletes eat can have effects on game day performance. It’s important to eat foods that will fuel the body and provide enough energy during the game. Carb-loading, however, is not a beneficial strategy for everybody. Loading up on carbs has both its pros and its cons for different athletes. With this in mind, we have put together our game day nutrition general list of some foods to consider before, during, and after a game.

Before the game

Carbohydrates provide the primary fuel for exercising muscles. Athletes should focus on eating carbs, which are broken down in the small intestine. Limit intake of fat and protein, which are processed in the stomach and can cause cramping and indigestion with exercise.

Consume (3-6 hours before)
  • Pasta
  • Baked potatoes
  • Lean meat
  • Fresh tacos
  • Cheese in a healthy meal
  • Healthy cereal with milk
(2-3 hours before)
  • 12-16 oz. of water, fruit or vegetable juice
  • Bagel with peanut butter
  • Yogurt
  • Granola bars
  • Cheese and crackers
  • Fresh fruit
Avoid
  • High fiber foods – broccoli, baked beans, bran cereal
  • High-fat foods – eggs, meat, cheese
  • Sugar, soda, candy
  • New foods

During the game

Hydrate based on length and intensity of the activity. Replace fluids according to thirst and weather.

Consume
  • Drink 16-32 oz. per hour for workouts longer than 1 hour
  • Water – for activity shorter than 1 hour
  • Sports drinks – for activity longer than 1 hour
  • Watermelon and orange slices are good for halftime
Avoid
  • High sugar snacks and drinks – candy, soda, fruit juice
  • Energy drink, caffeine
  • Refined carbs – bread, pasta
  • Sugar and caffeine may upset the stomach leading to lower performance

After the game

Hard exercise depletes the body of carbohydrates, which are essential for speeding recovery. Proteins are necessary to repair and develop muscle tissue. Athletes should begin to build their body’s supply of both these nutrients within the first 30 minutes after exercise

Consume (in between or after events)
  • Drink 16-32 oz. per hour for workouts longer than 1 hour
  • Peanut butter and jelly sandwich
  • Turkey sandwich
  • Protein, power bars
  • Yogurt
  • Hummus and/ or cheese and crackers
  • Nuts
  • String cheese
  • Raw veggies
Avoid
  • Concession candy
  • High fat, fried foods
  • Energy drinks, soda
  • Large, low protein meals

Injured? Need to find a sports nutritionist to design your game day nutrition plan? Reach out to a physical therapy clinic near you to get a local recommendation and find the help you need!

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Read our article on carb loading:

Pros and Cons of Carb Loading

aerobic exercise

5 Unique and Fun Ways to Do Aerobic Exercise

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aerobic exercise

Keeping our bodies healthy and active can be a chore. A well-balanced diet and regular exercise are important but not always fun. Even Zumba class can get old after some time. But there are things we can do to liven up our daily need for movement and luckily, they don’t need to cost a lot.

1. Batch Cooking

Do you want to get your steps in on a recovery day? Maybe you take Sunday’s off from the gym, but you don’t want to be a complete sloth. Try a couple of hours of meal prep before the week gets started. Begin with an easy internet search for some yummy recipes or perhaps discover a food that’s new to you.

2. Mowing the Lawn

The last thing many of us want to do is trudge up and down the lawn in the hot summer sun but this aerobic exercise can burn over 300 calories an hour. It all depends on the type of mower and the terrain, but this activity will keep you fit and make your home look great.

3. Gliding … in your living room

Gliding discs are an uncommon but effective workout that is easy and fun. Like sliding on hardwood floors when we wear socks, these inexpensive plastic discs can be used on carpet, tile and wood flooring without damaging the surface. These discs engage the entire body to maintain balance while working out the legs and booty.

4. Intense Stair Climbing

Have you heard of competitive stair climbing? Yup, there are athletes that race up the stairs of the Empire State Building. Maybe climbing up an Aztec ruin isn’t realistic, but even if you live in a single-story home, there are probably stairs near you. Just look at your office or go to a local park. Don’t fret if there is only one set of steps. Just climb the same flight until your heart rate is elevated.

5. Housework

Chores, whether it’s washing dishes, taking out the trash or vacuuming, are all necessary but uninspiring tasks that come with being an adult. Next time you sit down to watch a show, get up and clean every time a commercial comes on. Challenge yourself to get a task done within the commercial break. If you are paying for a streaming service that doesn’t have commercials, then set a timer to go off every 10-15 minutes and then set it again for 2-3 minute chore breaks. Like mowing the lawn, your body will get the movement it needs, and you also get a nicer living environment.

Make huge strides in aerobic fitness by using these fun and alternative ways to get your heart pounding. Keep it interesting by adding variety to your daily routine and the long-term health benefits are inevitable.

If you need help finding ways to be active ask your physical therapist.  PTs specialize in movement and can be a great resource!

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This guest post was written by Erika Long. She loves corgis, curry and comedy. Always searching for the next great snuggle, flavor or laugh, she inspires people to live their best life now. When not writing, Erika can be found at her local brewery dominating Harry Potter trivia night.

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PT News July 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout July 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

when your arm is a pain in the neck

1. When Your Arm is a Pain in the Neck
Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Many times, the initial discomfort results from nerves in the neck being pinched because the shoulder blade is not positioned correctly. Raising your arm above your head takes the stretch off the nerve and provides relief, but carrying something like a bag of groceries increases the stretch on the nerve, thus escalating the pain.  Read more

 

hydrate

2. Hydration During Exercise and Competition

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice throughout the PA’s Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

The fact that the body is made up of 60% water, and the brain 85%, makes water an essential nutrient for bodily function. Without adequate hydration, sports performance will be negatively affected, and serious illness, or death, can occur. Read more

 

rotator cuff exercises

3. 4 Exercises for Rotator Cuff Strength

Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with 3physical therapy locations in CT. 

This week, we will go over the rotator cuff anatomy, and provide you with 4 of our go-to exercises for strengthening the rotator cuff! Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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