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PT News June 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. 8 Great Pelvic Floor Stretches to Do During Pregnancy
Written by Ability Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout Orlando and Tampa Bay.

retching and strengthening your pelvic floor muscles during pregnancy can help relieve your aches and pains — and alleviate stress and tension too. Pelvic floor stretches will also help you have an easier delivery and decrease your risk of urinary incontinence later on.  Read more

 

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2. Get Active to Stay Active

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, a privately owned, outpatient physical therapy practice throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester Counties.

Summer is a time to have fun and spend time outdoors. It is an opportunity to enjoy the sunshine. It’s a time when you can go out for a walk and roll down the windows and take in everything that nature has to offer, allergies and all. Read more

 

3. For Shoulder Relief Try These Home Remedies

Written by Sport and Spine Physical Therapy with 4 physical therapy locations in Southern, WI.

Shoulder pain can be one of the most disabling problems to deal with. Whether you realize it or not, you use your shoulder pretty frequently throughout most days, as it permits practically any movement that involves your arms. Read more

exercise benefits mental health

Senior Tip: How Physical Exercise Benefits Mental Health

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exercise benefits mental health

We all know the importance of exercise in our lives. Exercise keeps our body, soul, and brain, healthy. It keeps us fit physically as well as mentally. According to Senior Guidance, older adults who exercise regularly have lower rates of getting any kind of mental illness. Moreover, exercise also helps in treating anxiety and depression. Many people believe that with growing age, exercise loses its effect. Hence, there is no need for elderly people to strain their bodies. That’s just not true. Exercise benefits mental health at every age.

Per health experts, regular exercise is highly beneficial for elderly people. It would not only let them live an active and healthy life but would help in increasing their life span. If you want to be physically, emotionally, and mentally fit, try doing regular exercise. Exercise benefits mental health by keeping seniors active and healthy, which would further help them live independently.

A regular, healthy part of senior living should be to find the motivation to do regular exercise. Routine exercise will help older adults become mentally strong and fight mental conditions like depression and anxiety, which are quite common at their age.

Benefits of exercise for aging adults and golden oldies include:

1. Helps You Sleep Better

One of the most common problems faced by senior people is the lack of sleep. As we get older, we tend to have a lighter and less deep sleep. Various researches have proved that exercise boost sleep. Regular exercise improves the quality of sleep. Physical activity like exercise increases the time of deep sleep, which further helps in boosting the immune system and controlling anxiety and stress. Moreover, exercise results in energy expenditure, which makes you feel tired, which results in longer and peaceful sleep.

2. Helps to Maintain the Level of Chemicals in Brain

Brain chemicals or neurotransmitters are responsible for how we feel, physically as well as mentally. This holds true for young and elderly people. Regular exercise stimulates the production of brain chemicals- dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Regular exercise boosts the release of these brain chemicals, which help us in improving our overall well-being. Exercise stimulates the production of norepinephrine, which counters the effect of stress response in our body. Exercise gives a relaxing and calming effect on our brain and body because of the release of serotonin. Hence, regular exercise is essential for senior people as it helps in maintaining the level of brain chemicals, which decreases mood disorder symptoms, reduces stress, and gives a feeling of calmness and relaxation.

3. Boosts Energy Levels

Fatigue is very common among elderly people. Exercise does not only help in overcoming fatigue but also increases the energy level in the body. Just taking a simple walk in the fresh air not only refreshes your mood but would also boost your energy levels. While exercising, we use the energy which is stored in our body and start making more of it. Sitting and remaining inactive will not bring any change in the state of fatigue. However, getting involved in some physical exercise will make you feel active.

4. Reduces the Muscle Tension

Muscle tension is another common health problem faced by elderly people. Prolonged semi-contracted state in muscles results in muscle tension. This further results in muscle pain and muscle spasm. One of the major causes of muscle tension is lack of exercise. In addition to this, with age, people start losing muscle mass and strength. Older adults who spend most of their time in remaining sedentary faces more muscle related problems. Tense muscles generally lack oxygen and vital nutrients. Exercise increases the flow of blood to muscle cells, which further increases the oxygenation in muscles.

5. Decreases the Risk of Falls

The risk of falls is much higher in older adults. Falls are quite dangerous for them as it not only causes physical damage to the body but also hampers their independence. Recovery time after falls increases with growing age. Regular exercise or enrollment in a fall prevention physical therapy program increases muscle strength and flexibility. Physical exercises result in better bone density, which makes bone stronger and reduces the risk of getting fractures and osteoporosis. Exercise reduces the risk of falls by improving coordination and balance.

6. Makes You Happier and Boosts Positivity

Regular exercise brings positivity in life and makes you feel happier. Exercise stimulates the release of the happy hormone ‘Dopamine’ in our brain. This hormone is very essential for feeling happiness. Studies state that with age, the dopamine level decreases in our brain. This makes regular exercise more important for senior adults.

7. Reduces the Risk of Developing Dementia

Recent studies show that inactivity increases the chances of Dementia among seniors, requiring memory care or assisted living at later stages of the disease. Dementia is an umbrella that covers various mental conditions, including judgment impairment, memory loss, etc. Regular exercise increases the blood flow to the brain, which keeps the cells healthy. Moreover, exercise increases the production of brain chemicals and growth factors, which helps in keeping existing cells healthy and also helps in the growth of new brain cells, which results in increasing memory and control thinking.

Regular exercise is essential for everyone irrespective of age. Exercise benefits mental health by reducing stress, depression, and anxiety. Just make sure to make exercise a part of your everyday regime. It will help you in living a healthy and happy life.

Please consult your healthcare provider before starting an exercise program. If you are looking for help developing an exercise routine that fits your needs and skill level, please reach out to your physical therapist for guidance.

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Post Surgical Rotator Cuff Physical Therapy

Post Surgical Rotator Cuff Physical Therapy

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Post Surgical Rotator Cuff Physical Therapy

A patient will typically be referred for rotator cuff surgery when 90% or more of the tendon is torn. The most common causes for rotator cuff injuries are aging, overuse of overhead activities and heavy lifting. Surgery should never be taken lightly, so we wanted to take some time to inform you about what to bring before surgery, things that can help you immediately after and then give an idea of what to expect as you go through a post surgical rotator cuff physical therapy treatment plan. These are general guidelines. More specific expectations can be given by your healthcare provider.

Items to bring with you before rotator cuff surgery

  • Sling
  • Ice Pack or Cold Therapy Unit

Using your sling

  • You will usually wear for about 4 weeks. (Removing only to wash up and do exercises)
  • Avoid ANY active reaching or lifting up to 6 weeks
  • Getting Dressed
    – Place involved arm in sleeve first.
    – Put your belt in pants first.
    – Slip on shoes is recommended.
  • Sleeping
    – It may be more comfortable sleeping in a recliner instead of a bed.
    – Support your arm with a towel roll or pillow if lying down.
  • Avoid showering for the first couple of days.  (Once able to shower, lean over to let your healing arm hang away from your body, while you use the other to wash.)

Icing your shoulder (Ice Pack or Cold Therapy Unit)

  • Ice for 20 minutes in your waking hour for the first few days.
  • Decrease to 3-5 times a day as needed for pain.

General Care

  • Change dressing daily as recommended by your physician/nurse.
  • No driving especially if right arm and if taking pain medications.
  • Walk around your home at least 1 time each hour to prevent blood clots.
  • Begin therapeutic exercises as soon as instructed

After being cleared for physical therapy, the normal course of a POST-SURGICAL rotator cuff physical therapy has been described as having five stages:

Stage 1: Immobilization

There is a mandatory period of rest for the arm following a rotator cuff surgery. The tendons have been repaired but need to wait through the biological healing phase in order to be able to accept the strain of moving the arm. This period may last 4-6 weeks and may be intermittent with the therapist being able to do slight motions to the arm to keep the joint from getting stiff.

Stage 2: Passive motion

During and after the immobilization phase, you’ll begin performing passive motion exercises. At first, the therapist will provide the muscle to move the arm, but over time, you’ll be educated in the use of pulleys, stretch straps and table stretches to allow the joint to move while keeping the muscles fully relaxed.

Stage 3: Active-Assisted motion

Once the shoulder has achieved full expected passive motion, and with the permission of the surgeon, your therapist will begin active-assisted motion. This type of exercise uses less than 100% of the surgical shoulder’s power to move the arm. The therapist may instruct you in pendulum exercises that employ gravity and momentum. Self-ranging exercises use the uninvolved arm to move the involved arm, either against the weight of gravity or lying down so that the weight of gravity is minimalized. The surgical arm’s responsibility will slowly increase up to 100% of the weight of the arm. Then, you’ll be ready for active motion.

Stage 4: Active motion

The active motion phase begins when the arm is able to carry its own weight against gravity but is not yet ready to lift, push or pull objects. During this phase, your therapist will demonstrate safe motion patterns of the shoulder and shoulder blade. They will monitor the coordination of movement between the muscles to check for specific weakness that could put strain on the repair. Once you can achieve full expected active range of motion against the weight of gravity, and with your physician’s approval, you’ll be ready to add weight.

Stage 5: Strengthening

The strengthening program may start out slowly. Be patient! The muscles are relearning how to work together so inflammation of the tendons and bursae are still a risk in this phase. Your therapist will recommend exercises that you can do at home in order to improve the arm’s tolerance for strength and to reduce the strain on the arm when you come into therapy. Over time, the therapist will demonstrate ways that you can safely use the arm for pushing up from a chair, pulling a door open, reaching into a cabinet and other activities of daily living.

Post surgical rotator cuff physical therapy care can vary based on the patient’s needs and ability levels. Depending upon the severity of the tear, physical therapy can work with patients to heal the tendon and reduce pain. To find a physical therapist near you click the button below.

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Periodization Weight Training

A Guide to Periodization with Weight Training

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Periodization Weight Training

Periodization is an important technique utilized with training in order to maximize gains, whether it be through increased aerobic performance, speed, and strength. This guide outlines simple tips customizing training programs to prevent plateauing with training and improve performance. By no means is this an exhaustive guide, or an end all be all in regards to what specific exercises to perform to improve function or performance. For specifics on what exercises to perform, this depends on what goals you seek to achieve and physical characteristics, which can be outlined by a physical therapist or certified strength and conditioning coach.

1. Strength, endurance, hypertrophy, power continuing and rest

The amount of resistance, number of repetitions, and speed the exercises are performed all have an impact on how the body will respond to training. Proper training requires proper rest between sets to maximize the effect of whatever you are trying to accomplish. For a rough and dirty guide on training loads and adaptations, use the following:

weight training


Brute Strength
100% of Max (1-5 Reps)
In this range, gains are made more from neuromuscular adaptations with little effect on muscle fiber size.
REST: When training for maximum strength or power, rest for 3— 5 minutes between sets.

 

weight training


Power Training (High Velocity)
80-90% of Max (1-3 Reps)
At a high velocity to promote endurance and power.
REST: When training for maximum strength or power, rest for 3— 5 minutes between sets.

 

weight lifting


Strength and Mass
76-82% of Max (6-8 Reps)
This range still heavily taxes the neuromuscular system but provides a high enough volume to help elicit gains in muscle mass.
REST: When training for strength, utilize a rest scheme of 2— 3 minutes between sets.

 

weight lifting


Mass
68-74% of Max (9-12 Reps)
This range is the best for providing a high enough volume to elicit large gains in muscle mass, but not enough of a stimulus to cause as great of a strength gain as high resistances.
REST: When training to maximize muscle mass, utilize a rest scheme of 60— 90 seconds between sets.

Endurance Training
13+ REPETITIONS- These rep ranges do a better job at promoting muscular endurance, but do not have a high enough intensity to elicit large changes in muscle mass.
REST: When training for endurance, utilize a rest scheme of 30— 45 seconds between each sent.

*Note the above information is applicable to multi-joint movements like squats and deadlifts. Single joint movements, such as bicep curls, can typically be done for a greater number of repetitions at any percentage of an individual’s given maximum, and so, will need to be assessed accordingly when developing a training program.

2. Training Cycles

Training cycles are an organized way to design a training program to meet a specific over-arching goal. This consists of macrocycles, mesocycles, and microcycles.

weight training cycle

3. Progressive vs. an Undulating Program

Progressive programs revolve around a systematic increase in volume, intensity, or both in a given cycle while an undulating program utilizes a randomized progression within a cycle, in which the volume, intensity, or both can vary daily, weekly, or monthly. Neither progression displays a significant superiority over one another in regards to peak performance. However, some suggest that undulating programs carry a smaller risk of overtraining. In reality, the utilization of both progression techniques allows progression and reduces the risk of overtraining while reducing the risk of plateauing.

Putting it all together (Example: 3 Month Training Progression)

Month 1- Capacity Building
Higher rep range to help the body become accustomed to training. Utilizing a combination of periodization an undulation in a month progression:

Example:

  • wk 1— 4 sets of 13—15 reps at 55% — 60%;
  • wk 2— 4 sets of 11—13 reps at 64%—70%;
  • wk 3— 4 sets of 10—12 reps at 68%—72%;
  • wk 4— 4 sets of 10—12 at 60% — 64%

Each week the rep ranges decreased with increasing resistance until week 4. The 1st 3 weeks utilize a linear progression in order to increase the body’s ability to handle a given training volume, but week 4 acts as a deloading week. This takes the undulating approach into account to alter load parameters to allow for recovery within a training cycle in order to reduce the risk of overtraining.  Another important note, the higher the resistance, the lower the number of repetitions performed.

Month 2- Hypertrophy Phase
Utilize a weight that is challenging for 9 to 12 repetitions with eventually progressing to 8 to 10 repetitions utilizing progressive system detailed in month 1.

Example:

  • wk 1— 10 to 12 reps at 68%— 72%
  • wk 2— 9 to 11 reps at 70%— 74%
  • wk 3— 8 to 10 reps at 72%— 76%
  • wk 4— sets of 8 at 64%— 70%

 

Month 3- Strength Phase
Utilizing resistance that is challenging for 6 to 8 reps and eventually progressing to a resistance that only allows for performing 4 to 6 reps.

Example:

  • wk 1— 6 to 8 reps at 76%— 82%
  • wk 2— 5 to 7 reps at 78%— 85%
  • wk 3— 4 to 6 reps at 82%— 88%
  • wk 4 sets of 5 to 8 at 70%— 75%

This would training progression could be used a stand-alone training progression, or as part of a more comprehensive training program. The three-month block could act as a mesocycle for a larger training program with each month acting as a microcycle to address short term goals.

*Note this is by no means an exhaustive list, nor is this a specific training progression for different sports. This is just an example of how the different concepts are written in this paperwork together in a training progression.

physical therapy near me

This article was written by Rehab Associates of Northern Virginia. Rehab Associates of Central Virginia is an outpatient physical therapy clinic that focuses on putting the patient’s needs first. Their physical therapists have advanced degrees in specialty orthopedic care from head to toe.

PT News PTandMe

PT News May 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout May 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

nutrition strategies

1. Effective Nutrition Strategies
Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with 8 physical therapy locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, MI.

How do you stay on target with eating healthy and being active? Between work schedules, kids schedules, appointments, and change of plans, finding time to exercise and eat right can sometimes feel impossible. Read more

 

physical therapy for headaches

2. Physical Therapy Can Help Headaches
Written by Mishock Physical Therapy and Associates, a privately owned, outpatient physical therapy practice throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester Counties.

Headache pain is the third most common pain complaint worldwide. Some people suffer from the occasional headache, but others suffer from daily, chronic headaches which can be disabling, interfere with one’s ability to work and result in decreased quality of life. Read more

 

Does Mono Mean no exercise

3. Does Mono Mean No Exercise?
Written by The Jackson Clinics with 21 physical therapy locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Mononucleosis—often known simply as “mono”—has an incubation period of one to two months. Once symptoms appear, recovery can take an additional four to six weeks. Until your physician tells you it is safe to resume more strenuous workouts, avoid any but the mildest exercise. Read more

sun safety

Sun Safety

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sun safety

The official start to summer is fast approaching and for many of us, the end of the school year marks the start of outdoor activities and beach vacations. While enjoying yourself this summer be sure to take precautions. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these sun safety recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

  • Shade
    You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelters before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.
  • Clothing
    When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor. If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.
  • Hat
    For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection. If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen with at least SPF 30, or by staying in the shade.
  • Sunglasses
    Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure. Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.
  • Sunscreen
    Put on a broad-spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

How sunscreen works. Most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 30, don’t use them by themselves.

Information supplied by the CDC

prevent joint pain physical therapy

6 Ways to Find Relief and Prevent Joint Pain

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prevent joint pain physical therapy

Joint pain is a common issue that can have many causes and can lead to an array of complications. Joint pain affects such a large percentage of the population. It is estimated that by the year 2030, 67 million—one in every four American adults—will have doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That doesn’t mean that we have to live in pain. It’s important to understand your pain and to take the steps needed to make sure it doesn’t lower your standard of living.

So, what are some great ways to relieve and prevent joint pain?

Going to Physical therapy

Physical therapy is a good solution for treating various joint pain symptoms. Physical therapists can help prevent or delay joint replacements, manage symptoms of arthritis/ chronic joint pain while providing tools to minimize pain or further damage to the joint, and help acutely injured joints recovery from injury. Improving flexibility and range of motion in the affected joints is also a key component in most physical therapy programs.

Getting enough movement and exercise

Even though the natural inclination for a person experiencing joint pain would be to move as little as possible, movement and light exercise will often time do the exact opposite, and be a great ally on your journey towards pain relief.

Good exercises for those who suffer from inflammation causing joint pain are aerobics, water aerobics, bicycling, burst training exercises, social activities that include movement, Tai Chi, light weight lifting, and yoga.

Go for a massage

Massaging the affected joint can be a treat, especially for joint pain occurring in the hips and knees. You can have this done at a treatment center, or have a professional who provides this type of service come to your home, but this is also something that a loved one can do for you, or that you can do yourself. An infographic from spa-hotels.ie has shown the benefits associated with massage therapy, including reducing joint pain and stress levels.

Maintain an ideal weight

Having a high BMI can cause joint pain. The more weight on the joint, the more effort is needed to move and support the body. Introducing movement and light exercise to a daily routine, as well as working towards a healthier diet, can reduce the strain on the joints. Before beginning an exercise regimen, it is important to consult your healthcare provider. A physical therapist or physician can introduce an exercise program that is tailored to your needs and ability level.

Eat an anti-inflammatory diet

Making the change to an anti-inflammatory diet is a great way to naturally alleviate joint pain. The Mediterranean diet is a good example of what anti-inflammatory eating habits should look like. One thing to be aware of is the fact that some of the most inflammatory foods out there are dairy and gluten products.

In order to mitigate joint pain through diet would be to eat a healthy amount fruits and vegetables, berries and nuts, various types of spices and herbs, as well as teas, such as green tea or ginger tea. Processed meats, fast food, artificial sweeteners, refined sugars, and chips should be cut as much as possible. Working with a nutritionist can help introduce long-term meaningful changes to a diet plan.

Get enough sleep

Believe it or not, the quality and quantity of sleep is a factor in pain relief. New research suggests that irregular sleep contributes to pain in a variety of ways, including the ability to tolerate pain. By adjusting your posture at night to keep pressure off of the painful joints, the body is able to more easily relax and allow for sleep. Exercising and remaining active throughout the day should also help you get better sleep at night.

As joint pain has become common, we tend to accept it as something we can’t really control. However, when looking at the most common causes for joint pain, we can clearly see that a sedentary lifestyle, high anxiety levels produced by stress, and unhealthy food choices are leading causes related to the issue in question.

In order to prevent inflammation, as much as in the purpose of relieving joint pain, we have to make better decisions regarding our way of living. This means creating an environment for ourselves and for our families where movement is valued and practiced on a daily basis. It also means that we should make an effort in order to ensure that there’s always a bit of time during the day to help clear one’s head by engaging in mindful practice, or by taking up a relaxing leisure activity. Equally important, it is essential to set dietary boundaries and to respect our body by not constantly abusing it with food that’s poor in nutrients, and lacks all of the advantages healthy food brings to the table when talking about the general health of the human body.

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low back pain relief

Low Back Pain: There is relief

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low back pain relief

Understanding back pain: You’re not alone & there is relief

Low back pain affects nearly everyone at some stage of life and is one of the most common ailments seen in medical practices. It is referred to by many different names including lumbago, lumbar sprain or strain, slipped or bulging disc, degenerative arthritis, or, when it extends into the leg, sciatica. Research suggests that between 60% – 75% of the population who experience back pain once will experience recurring or chronic problems. Most patients will not consult their physician for first-time problems their back, so you may be one of the thousands worldwide who continue to have recurring problems with their back.

To most people, their low back pain is confusing and frustrating. Many times it starts without warning and for no obvious reason. It will interfere with the performance of basic daily activities and the ability to get a good night’s sleep. Then, often the pain will subside just as unexpectedly as it started. When in acute pain, most people are unable to think clearly about the trouble and simply seek pain relief. When episodes of back pain subside, most will then go on to forget about their back trouble. Due to a lack of understanding of the specific nature of the back problem, we are unable to deal with the problem ourselves and are unable to prevent future episodes.

The majority of back pains are mechanical in nature, meaning that they are caused by problems with the moving parts of the spine. Therefore, certain movements that you make and positions you adopt can lead to the onset or worsening of pain. A very common example of this is patients who complain of worsening pain with bending forward for prolonged periods. Also, sitting for prolonged periods at work or while driving will bother these individuals and they might find it hard to get up from a sitting position. In some cases, it might even take a few minutes to be able to stand upright properly.

If you are like most patients with mechanical low back pain, you are better when you can move around frequently and worse when you have to remain in one position for long periods. You feel better when you are walking or are able to change positions frequently. There are times in the day where you will be much better and might even have no pain at all, and there are times when it is much worse. There are some whose pain will have worsened to the point that it is constant and the changing of positions is necessary to simply find some relief from the pain.

If you are a back pain sufferer, be encouraged that most patients can get significant help with their back pain. Exercise and activity need to be a regular part of your management strategy, but the exercise must be specific to your problem. Your program should include a daily walking program if possible. Management of your back problem is each individual’s responsibility, but we are here to help you. You may benefit from an individualized consultation with a physical therapist with specific training to evaluate mechanical spine disorders if your pain does not subside.

Common Back Problems Seen by Physical Therapists:

  • Strains & Sprains
  • Herniated Discs
  • Degenerated Discs
  • Sciatica
  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Spondylosis
  • Spondylolisthesis

Low Back Pain Quick Assessment

If 3 or more Yes’s are present then the patient would likely benefit from a Mechanical Diagnosis and Physical Therapy Examination.

The more YES’s that are present, the higher the probability of a successful outcome with a mechanical examination.

  • Are symptoms present for less than 16 days in the most recent exacerbation? Yes or No
  • If the patient has lower extremity symptoms, are the symptoms above the knee? Yes or No
  • Does the patient’s low back pain vary in intensity? Yes or No
  • Do movements or positions change the patient’s symptoms? Yes or No
  • Does the patient have a hard time standing after sitting? Yes or No
  • Are the symptoms worse after bending, stooping, or sitting? Yes or No
  • Are the symptoms usually worse in the morning? Yes or No

physical therapy near me

For more information about back pain, physical therapy click the links below.

Low Back Pain Physical Therapy  chronic back pain  beware bed rest for back pain

PT News PTandMe

PT News April 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout April 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

shoulder impingement

1. The Truth Behind Shoulder Impingement
Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with 3 physical therapy locations in Connecticut.

Shoulder impingement (Subacromial Impingement Syndrome) is a condition of the shoulder that results in pain felt at the front of the shoulder, under a bone called the acromion process, that is often worse with repetitive or frequent overhead activity.  Read more

 

what is certified hand therapy

2. What is Certified Hand Therapy?
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple physical therapy locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

You may have heard of Certified Hand Therapists (CHTs) and wondered if they are the only therapists that can treat hand injuries. You may have also wondered why therapists needed a special certification to treat a specific body part. Read more

 

wrist pain

3. The Power (and Weakness) of the Wrist
Written by the physical therapy team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy with 5 locations in Ohio.

A wrist fracture has the potential to impact daily life for an extended period of time. Wrist fractures result from falls, sports activities, and improper lifting. Owing to the complex architecture of the bones, muscles, and ligaments in the wrist and hand, healing can take a while. Read more

fall prevention at home

Fall Prevention: Risks & Tips in your home

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fall prevention tips at home

While falls can happen anywhere, more than half of them happen in the home. One in every three adults 65 and older fall AT HOME each year in the U.S. One of the easiest ways to help prevent a fall is to make sure that certain tripping hazards are addressed and removed. We’ve compiled a short list below to help you get started.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS FOR FALLING ARE:

  • Feeling pain or stiffness when you walk
  • Needing to walk slower or to hold on to things for support
  • Feeling dizzy or unsteady when you get up from your bed or chair
  • Feeling weak in your legs
  • You take more than one medication
  • You have problems seeing
  • You have had at least one fall in the past year

RISKS TO CONSIDER WHEN FALL PROOFING YOUR HOME:

Lighting

  • Is the lighting adequate, especially at night?
  • Are stairwells well lit?
  • Is there a working flashlight in case of power failure?
  • Can lights easily be turned on even before entering
    a dark room?

Surfaces

  • Are there any wet surfaces that are frequently wet?
  • Are steps and stairs in good repair and the
    appropriate rise?
  • Do steps have handrails in good repair?

Trip Hazards

  • Are there throw rugs in the walking path?
  • Does the family pet often sleep in walking paths?
  • Is the carpet in good repair without tears or fraying?
  • Are there extension cords or raised door sills in the walking paths?
  • Is there a clear path from the bed to the bathroom?

If you feel that you are at risk for falls, talk to your physical therapy provider. Most physical therapy clinics offer fall risk assessments that can help determine any areas of risk. By participating in a fall prevention program, you can reduce the likelihood of a fall and increase the ability to live independently. Fall prevention programs mainly focus on core strength, flexibility, and patient education.

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FLYR_FallPrevention_HomeFalls

For more information about balance and fall prevention click the links below: