Tag Archives: Pennsylvania

sensory integration

Physical Therapy for Sensory Integration

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What Is Sensory Integration?
It is the organization of our senses for use. Our senses include vision, auditory, tactile, olfactory, gustatory, vestibular, and proprioception. Our senses give us information about physical aspects of our body and the environment around us. This is a higher functioning process that takes place inside the brain. The brain is responsible for organizing all sensations to assist us in learning and behaving normally. When your sensory system is functioning appropriately we can form perceptions, manifest appropriate behaviors, and learn without complications. When your sensory system is not functioning appropriately, everything seems to be disorganized and chaotic.

What is Sensory Processing?
The brains ability to receive, organize, and efficiently use information provided to us from all the senses. This means taking information in the environment, organizing it within the central nervous system, and peripheral nervous system resulting in a motor response.

What is Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)?
Sensory Processing Disorder (also known as SPD), is when the central nervous system is not processing correctly.

There are 3 types of SPD:

1.) Sensory Modulation Disorder
2.) Sensory Discrimination Disorder
3.) Sensory Based Motor Disorder

Sensory Integration Program Goals:

  • Increase Sensory Processing
  • Increase Self Regulation
  • Increase Self Esteem
  • Increase Learning Ability
  • Increase Social Skills
  • Increase Gross/Fine Motor Skills
  • Increase Motor Planning
  • Increase Coordination
  • Increase Socialization
  • Increase Coping Skills
  • Increase Visual
  • Motor/Perception

AND HAVE FUN!

This information was written by ProCare Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 11 locations in Pennsylvania. ProCare physical therapists select only appropriate tests to evaluate and quantitatively measure the patient’s problem. Then, in consultation with the referring physician, an appropriate rehabilitation plan is developed. For more information click here.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

basketball

1. How Does an NBA Player Overcome Career Limiting Ankle Injury?
Written by Nick Mezyk, DPT, Clinic Director at ProCare Physical Therapy – Johnstown, PA

If you have played sports long enough, you have most likely experienced the following… You’re running down the field, court or track, and you go to make a quick cut. Except you end up crumbling to the ground because you rolled your ankle causing a popping sensation on the outside portion of that ankle. Read more

mountain biking

2. Ride More, Hurt Less on Your Next Bike Ride
Written by Grace Ellison, PT, DPT at Integrated Rehabilitation Group, Silver Lake Physical Therapy – Everett, WA

Whether you are enjoying a weekend trail ride or training for your next triathlon. It is important to ensure that you are taking the correct steps to stay injury free during your next time out. Read more

gym guy

3. Top Equipment Free Exercises You Should Be Doing 
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

The idea of exercising always conjures up visions of personal trainers, expensive gyms, high-end equipment, and lots of grunting, groaning, and personal torture. That’s never the case when we use the term exercise. Read more

golf stretches

Dynamic Golf Stretches

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Golf requires strength, flexibility, endurance and power to create pain free movement and improve your game. The most common golf injury is low back pain followed by shoulder pain and knee pain. A physical therapist can assist you in improving your pain and correct your body’s deficits.  These golf stretches will make your golf game less painful and reduce those extra strokes:

hamstring stretch

Hamstring Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

back extension stretch

Back Extension Stretch
(hold club backwards overhead, repeat 10x)

hip back shoulder rotation

Hip/Back/Shoulder Rotation Stretch
(hold club behind back and rotate torso to each side 10x)

calf stretch

Calf Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

lumbar rotation 1

lumbar rotation 2

Lumbar Spine Rotation
(hold club, plant feet as shown, rotate to each side 10x)

forearm rotation 1

forearm rotation 2

forearm rotation 3

Forearm Rotation
(hold club straight up, then rotate to each side 10x)

This information was written by Mishock Physical Therapy and Associates, a privately-owned, outpatient physical therapy practice operating 6 clinics in 2 counties located in southeast Pennsylvania. They actively participate in the community by providing services to schools, retirement communities and local businesses. Their mission is to provide the most efficacious, state-of-the-art physical therapy services to relieve pain, restore function and return you to the highest quality of life possible. For more information click here.