Tag Archives: Physical Therapy

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PT News June 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Beach Activities

1. Our Top 10 Beach Activities

Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern, VA.

Summer is here and, despite the cicadas and lack of a proper Spring season, it’s time to get out and enjoy the sun. We asked our team to share their favorite beach activities. From building sandcastles to creating fantastic smoothies, our Top 10 list delivers fun and affordable activities for the whole family!  Read more

 

2. Managing Return to Work Aches and Pains

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations serving Greater Grand Rapids, MI. 

Over the past several months, many people have experienced an extended time away from work due to the covid-19 pandemic but recently employees have gradually begun returning to their regular work routine. As we return to our places of employment and re-adjust to the physical demands of our jobs, we undoubtedly will experience an onset of aches and pains. Thankfully a majority of these aches and pains will resolve on their own or with some basic interventions.  Read more

 

Frozen Shoulder Physical Therapy

3. 5 Keys to Treating a Frozen Shoulder

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout ID. 

We explore the meaning of stiff shoulder as it refers to a sub-optimal range of motion for performance that is physically and, at times, mentally debilitating. The lack of motion from a stiff shoulder can have a significant impact on daily living, vocation, and recreation. There are 5 key principles for treating the “frozen” shoulder. These apply to all shoulders which lack range of motion, regardless of the particular diagnosis.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News June 2021 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

More Enjoyable Bike Ride

8 Tips for an Enjoyable Bike Ride

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Optimizing your bike and clothing isn’t just for competitive racers. Even if you’re just looking to ride a few miles recreationally, you can be more comfortable and have more fun by following our tips for a more enjoyable bike ride!

1. Check Tire Pressure
If your tires are too soft, you have a much higher chance of “pinching” a tube, causing a flat. Low pressure also increases rolling resistance, making it more difficult for you to ride at a normal speed. Check the sidewall of your tires for recommended pressure range; it doesn’t need to be at the maximum, but be sure it’s at or above the minimum.

2. Seat Angle
Everyone has a different preference on exact seat angle and position, but it should be roughly level. Deviations of 1-2 degrees up or down are OK, but don’t point up or down too much. This can place unnecessary pressure on pelvic soft tissue or the hands/wrists.

3. Seat Height
An old belief about seat height was that you must be able to touch the ground with both feet when sitting on the saddle. If you are very new to cycling, this does improve your ability to stay upright at very slow speeds. A seat that is too low, can put excess pressure on your knees and back, making it less efficient. A “proper” seat height has the knee at about 30 degrees of bend at the lowest point in the pedal stroke.

4. Stay Hydrated
Carry water with you on any ride longer than 30 minutes (shorter in hot conditions). You can use a backpack-style hydration pack, or a simple water bottle and cage. Almost all bicycles have bolts to hold a water bottle cage. Whichever method you choose, get familiar with it and get in the habit of using it often.

5. Know How to Change a Tube
Carry the items needed to replace a tube in the event of a flat tire. Your local bike shop can help you with choosing these items. These can all be carried in a bag under your seat. You don’t need to be Nascar pit-crew-fast at it, but you want to know how to fix a flat tire so you don’t end up stranded.

6. Like Lycra
Very few people think of bike shorts as a good fashion statement. However, if you’re riding more miles, especially in warm weather, they provide comfort that can’t be matched with basketball or running shorts.

7. Be Visible
Along with the bike shorts, make sure your t-shirt or jersey is a bright color that will keep you visible in traffic. If there is a chance you’ll be riding near or in darkness, be sure to have at least a rear and preferably also a front light on your bicycle.

8. Riding Shouldn’t Hurt
Sure, if you’re looking to get a hard workout or ride fast, your legs will feel the burn. However, if your body and bike are working together properly, riding shouldn’t cause any joint pain. If you can’t ride without getting neck, back, hip, or knee pain, consider having a professional look at either your body or your bike fit. Better yet, have a physical therapist who is versed in bike fitting address both at the same time. The answer to most aches and pains is rarely just in one area (bike fit or bodywork), and a combined approach will usually work best for alleviating pain and getting the most out of your ride.

bike_couple

Let Physical Therapy help you before your pain turns into an injury.

What an ache tells you:
•  It’s the first clue your body is telling you something is wrong.
•  Your body can accommodate the ache, but eventually, a breakdown will happen.
•  While you accommodate to your ache, weakness, and lack of flexibility start.
•  Once you have a breakdown, the pain will begin, and more than likely you will stop doing the activities you currently enjoy.

How physical therapy can help prevent sports injuries:
•  Modify exercise routines when you have a minor ache and pain (This does not always mean you need to stop exercising!)
•  Get assessed for weakness and flexibility issues to address biomechanical deficits.
•  Educate on faulty or improper posture or body mechanics during exercise
•  Educate and help with techniques on exercises that help your muscles stretch farther. Flexibility training helps prevent cramps, stiffness, and injuries, and can give you a wider range of motion.
•  Correct muscle imbalances through flexibility and strength training.
•  Alleviate pain.
•  Correct improper movement patterns.

Common Cycling-related pain and injuries that Physical Therapy can treat:
•  Low Back Pain
•  Neck Pain
•  Foot numbness
•  Shoulder pain
•  Muscle strains
•  Hand pain/numbness

This information about having a more enjoyable bike ride was written by Advanced Physical Therapy, a physical therapy group that uses progressive techniques and technologies to stay on the forefront in their field. Their staff is committed to providing patients with advanced healing techniques. For more information click here.

Struggling with an ache, pain, or simply need help getting your bike fitted? Our team can help make sure you get the most out of your time on your bike!

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PT News PTandMe

PT News April 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout April 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Physical Therapy Can Relieve Your Arthritis Pain in These 4 Ways

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Ohio.

Physical therapy is one of the highest-rated treatments for arthritis pain. While so many people think of physical therapy as a treatment for following an injury or after a devastating health condition like a heart attack or stroke, utilizing physical therapy for arthritis pain is both highly effective and recommended.  Read more

 

2. What is Proprioception Injury Prevention?

Written by O.S.R. Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with 4 locations in Minneapolis. 

Proprioception injury prevention is simply using your body’s sense of orientation to prevent an injury. Thinking about how you’re moving, what’s around you, and your position can help you stay clear of acute injuries. Acute sports injuries are some of the most painful injuries for an athlete. An injury is physically painful. But, it can also be emotionally painful as you’re sidelined for days and even months until you recover.  Read more

 

ACL Soccer Knee

3. Second ACL Tear 7 Times More Likely in Young Athletes

Written by Custom Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 3 locations near Reno, NV.

If you return to knee-strenuous sporting activities (e.g. soccer, volleyball) within 9 months of your ACL reconstruction and you are 25 years old or younger, you are 7 times more likely to sustain a second ACL tear! Those who returned to their sport 12 months after surgery fared substantially better.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News April 2021 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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posture causes neck pain

Posture is a leading cause of Neck Pain.

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posture causes neck pain

Neck pain is a common problem among adults and with the help of smartphones and tablets, is becoming more frequent among young adults.  Studies have shown that the incidence of neck pain is increasing making it second only to low back pain in worker’s compensation costs.  Seventy percent of adults will experience neck pain in their lifetime and over fifty percent of adults have experienced neck pain in the last six months.  Symptoms of cervical dysfunction may include dizziness and headaches as well as neck pain. Neck pain may be a result of trauma, stress, poor posture, static or repetitive movements.

Physical therapy can be effective in treating many types of neck pain.  The combination of modalities, manual therapy, and exercise, as well as postural and ergonomic correction, is proven to provide the best long-term results. It’s also important to look at the whole body for postural issues as well as movement disorders that could cause increased stress on the neck. Chronic neck pain may be from altered patterns of muscle activation with upper extremity use, resulting in the increased use of the accessory muscles.  The increased use of these muscles along with the decreased use of the neck flexors can lead to decreased ability for neck stabilization which can result in neck pain, headaches or dizziness.

Physical therapists can design a specific program to restore alignment and muscular stabilization, resulting in decreased neck pain. Range of motion and posture can be improved with cervical and scapular strengthening exercises, which are an integral part of any physical therapy program for the neck. However, no physical therapy program for neck pain is complete without patient education. This includes a home exercise program along with the postural and ergonomic correction. This is specific to each patient and also encompasses all aspects of life including sleeping, work, and recreation.

See if your posture may be contributing to your neck pain.

Posture IQ Quiz

1. When you’re sitting at the computer are you:

A. Leaning into the computer with your head closest to the screen?

B. Sitting upright with your back to the office chair?

2. Is your keyboard:

A. Positioned in the middle of the desk (forcing you into a reach)?

B. Directly in front of you at the edge of your desk?

3. Is your computer screen:

A. At an angle or tilted

B. At eye level, directly in front of you

4. When driving, can you feel your head against the headrest?

A. No, I’m leaned forward looking out the windshield

B. Yes, and I use the lumbar support feature in my car


If you answered A to 2 or more questions, you’re most likely going to suffer from posture-related symptoms throughout your life.
If you answered B to most questions, you’ve got an excellent posture IQ and will save yourself years of potential back, neck, and shoulder pain.
(Quiz provided by Life Fitness Physical Therapy  – Ellicott City, MD)

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More information you may find helpful:

text neck   office ergonomics

Athletic Injuries PTandMe

3 Types of Athletic Injuries

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Did you know that most athletic injuries can be boiled down into three main categories?  Acute, Overuse and Chronic.  Physical therapists that specialize in sports medicine, help athletes experiencing pain get back in their sport.  From the time of the injury through recovery and performance, the licensed physical therapists that partner with PTandMe have the know-how and experience to get rid of your pain.

1.) ACUTE: Usually a result of a single traumatic event within the last five days. Examples: fractures, sprains, dislocations, muscle strains.

2.) OVERUSE: Subtle and occur over time, making them challenging to diagnose and treat. Examples: swimmer’s shoulder, runner/jumpers knee, Achilles tendonitis, shin splints.

3.) CHRONIC: Usually has lasted at least three months or more.

COMMON CAUSES OF INJURIES:

  • Improper training and technique
  • Incorrect equipment fitting and support
  • Anatomic or biomechanical issues of athlete
  • Catastrophic event on or off the field

football injury

OVERUSE INJURIES AND BURNOUT
Overuse/overtraining injuries and burnout are a major problem for adolescent athletes. Both can occur when students participate in sports year-round with no “off season”, or have insufficient recovery time between practices and games.

WATCH for typical burnout signs:

  • Pain during or after activity, or while at rest
  • Lack of enthusiasm for practices or games
  • Dip in grades

PREVENT overuse injuries and burnout with these simple tips:

  • Allow enough time for proper warm-up and cool down routines
  • Rest 1-2 days per week or engage in another activity
  • Focus on strength, conditioning or cross training during the “off season”

Did you know that 50% of all sports injuries to student athletes are a result of overuse?

SPRAIN
Sprains result from overstretching or tearing of the joint capsule or ligament which attaches a bone to another bone.

STRAIN
Strains, also referred to as pulls, result from over-stretching or tearing a muscle or tendon, which attaches a muscle region to a bone.

CONTUSIONS
Contusions or bruises are an injury to tissue or bone in which the capillaries are broken and local bleeding occurs.

TEARS
Tears are a complete separation of the tissue fibers.

Physical therapy and athletics go hand in hand. In many cases, your PT may be a former athlete that experienced an injury in their youth, and as a result found a passion for rehabilitating others. If you are experiencing pain, or have already had an injury, don’t wait to talk to your physical therapist. The faster you ask for help the faster you can get back into your sport.

For more information about physical therapy and sports medicine – try the links below:


       

This article about athletic injuries was provided by PTandMe physical therapy partner: The Center for Physical Rehabilitation. More information about the Center and their locations throughout Grand Rapids, MI can be found on their website at www.pt-cpr.com

gardening ergonomics

Gardening Ergonomics

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gardening ergonomics

It’s that time of year again. Time to exchange snow shovels and winter boots with gardening tools and watering cans. While the warmer weather brings on a new sense of happiness and energy, we need to remember to use proper body mechanics and follow general safety to avoid muscle aches and potentially serious injuries. The number one injury associated with gardening is low back pain. If you have experienced a recent injury or pain, we can help you recover.

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Here are a few tips to make your gardening experience more enjoyable and less painful.

LIFTING:
Lifting heavy objects such as bags of soil, planters, and mulch improperly can lead to low back strains and/or sciatic pain. Other options include moving half of the soil/mulch to a separate pot before lifting the bag or planting into smaller pots that are easier to maneuver. Using a garden cart or wheelbarrow can also assist with moving heavy gardening materials. Remember to lift with your legs, avoid simultaneous lifting and twisting and keep heavier objects close to your body to avoid injury.

PLANTING:
Prepping the soil can also be a difficult and tedious task requiring prolonged forward bending and frequent changes in position. Try prepping the planting bed by using long-handled gardening tools. Once the soil is ready, plant from a kneeling position using either a kneeling stool or a cushion. Remember to avoid twisting at the spine. Those with known chronic low back pain may want to consider planting in to pots, flower boxes or raised flower beds to avoid further injury.

WEEDING:
Most people dislike weeding their gardens and flower beds. Options to reduce the need to do so include using plants as ground cover or using mulch in your flower beds to minimize weed growth. If using a weed spray, look for bottles that have a sprayer hose to allow you to stand upright while treating your problem areas.

MOWING THE LAWN:
Another task that most people find tedious. When able, use an electric start mower. The action of pulling a cord to start your mower is the most common cause of low back injuries. If you must use a pull start mower, remember to bend at your knees and maintain the natural curve of your spine while reaching for the cord. Make sure you tighten your abdominal muscles just before pulling the cord in order to support your spine. If using a push mower, remember to maintain a proper upright posture and take breaks as needed.

Remember to listen to your body. Take frequent breaks and change positions when you start to experience aching, cramping, or fatigue. Stay hydrated and wear sunscreen. If you do happen to experience low back pain or any other injury, remember to contact your physical therapist. They can help alleviate your symptoms as well as educate you on proper body mechanics.

gardening

GARDENING STRETCHES
Stretching before you start gardening can help you from experiencing pain later. Here are some stretching techniques to help get you started!

1.) Fold your hands together and turn your palms away from your body, but this time extend your arms overhead. You should feel the stretch in your upper torso and shoulders to your hand. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

2.) Place your hand just above the back of the elbow and gently push your elbow across your chest toward the opposite shoulder. This is a stretch for the upper back and shoulder. Stretch both the right and left arms. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

3.) Raise one arm overhead. Bend the elbow. Place the opposite hand on the bent elbow and gently push the elbow back further. This is a stretch for the triceps. Stretch both the right and left arms. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

4.) Extend an arm in front of you, making sure the elbow is completely straight. With your palm down, take the opposite hand and bend in the wrist downward. Then turn the palm up, and stretch the wrist backward. This stretches the forearm and wrist muscles. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

If you are experiencing pain, trust a licensed professional. Our therapists will help identify the cause of your pain and work with you to help it go away, and prevent pain and injury in the future.

physical therapy near me

The warm-up exercises were developed by professional hand therapists who are occupational and physical therapists specializing in the treatment of the hands, arms, and shoulders. These exercises and tips have been designed to supplement more commonly known gardening safety practices that concentrate only on preventing back injuries.
For more information visit: www.asht.org

common basketball injuries

Common Basketball Injuries

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Whether you are a weekend warrior or involved in youth sports, athletes ages 5-75 can experience injuries from playing the games they love. Physical therapists are adept at working with patients suffering from common basketball injuries and can help in a variety of different ways.

One of the most common basketball injuries is an ankle sprain. An Ankle sprain is a partial or complete tear of the ligaments that support the ankle. Ankle sprains may be caused by falling or sudden twisting of the ankle, such as:
• Stepping on an uneven surface or in a hole
• Taking an awkward step when running, jumping, or stepping up or down
• Having your ankle roll over when playing sports or exercising called inversion of the foot

Physical therapy intervention is the standard for treatment of ankle sprains. Treatment for the acute ankle sprain is based primarily upon the RICE principles: Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. This is followed quickly by a program of exercises and functional training to reduce the likelihood of chronic ankle instability. Balance and “proprioceptive” training are critical components of the rehabilitation process. In the case of a severe sprain and subsequent chronic instability, surgical intervention may be indicated.

Stress fractures are also seen frequently. A stress fracture is a tiny crack in the bone from chronic overuse. It is typically caused by repeated stress or overuse.
Causes include:
• Increasing the amount or intensity of an activity too quickly
• Switching to a different playing or running surface
• Wearing improper or old shoes
• Stress fractures can worsen by continued physical stress. Smoking can also make

Rest is the first thing you can do for a stress fracture. This includes avoiding the activity that caused the fracture and any other activities that cause pain. Rest time required is at least 6-8 weeks. Once you are ready to restart activity your physician may prescribe physical therapy. They may begin with non weightbearing activities, such as swimming, cycling, use of an Alter-G treadmill. Next, weight-bearing, nonimpact exercise may be prescribed. Gradually, low-impact activity, starting with walking, will be added to your treatment. Once you can do fast-paced walking with no pain, your physical therapist will give higher impact activities, such as light jogging.

spinning basketball

HAND INJURIES are also commonly seen in basketball. If you experience a finger injury, a hand therapist will work to make sure your fingers heal correctly and reduce the risk of long term damage.

A Boutonniere injury is usually the result of a forceful blow to the bent finger and causes a disruption of the central slip of the extensor tendon insertion at the level of the middle phalanx. The middle joint (PIP) is unable to fully straighten. If left untreated, a PIP flexion contracture can result and chronic deformity ensue. Acute boutonniere injuries are treated with PIP extension splinting continuously 4-8 weeks. Chronic boutonniere injuries with PIP flexion contractures are treated with dynamic splinting to improve passive PIP extension and static splinting for at least 4 weeks once full PIP extension is achieved.

Mallet injuries are seen commonly with ball sports and result when the terminal extensor tendon is torn from the attachment on the bone. When this occurs, a small fragment of bone may be avulsed from the distal phalanx and the end of the finger droops down and cannot be straightened actively. X rays are necessary to determine the course of treatment. Bony mallet injuries may require surgical correction. Most of these injuries can be treated conservatively with continuous DIP extension splinting for 6-8 weeks.

PT News PTandMe

PT News March 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout February and March 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Sports Injury Physical Therapy

1. 5 Common Sports Injuries: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment

Written by Wright Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Idaho.

Sports injuries happen, and they usually occur when engaging in sports or exercise. Sports injuries can occur due to overtraining, lack of conditioning, and improper form or technique. Failing to warm-up increases the risk of sports injuries.  Read more

 

The Cost of Being Sedentary

2. The Cost of Being Sedentary

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia. 

While it might be easy to list off all of the benefits of exercising, we don’t typically talk about the cost of being sedentary.  In fact, a recent study by Jama followed over 100,000 adults for more than 8 years and measured their fitness using a treadmill. The participants were arranged by age and gender into performance groups:  Read more

 

Work From Home Pain Relief

3. Work-at-Home Pain Relief

Written by JACO Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 4 locations throughout Oahu, HI.

We have found that many of our patients are still working from home and spending more time than they anticipated working at a less-than-ideal workstation. We’ve been seeing complaints of neck pain, back pain, and wrist pain that is caused by strain from poor body mechanics while working.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News March 2021 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News PTandMe

PT News January 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December 2020 and January 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Shoulder Pain Treatment

Written by Riverview Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Southern Maine.

If you are looking for shoulder pain treatment in Southern Maine, the information below will help you make a better decision as well as help you avoid unnecessary and expensive healthcare treatment. There are seven common diagnoses that cause shoulder pain and usually respond very well to physical therapist directed treatment. These diagnoses are:  Read more

 

Snow Shoveling

2. Prevent Low Back Pain While Shoveling Snow

Written by Rehab Associates of Central VA, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout VA. 

As I was shoveling the snow off my driveway this week, I quickly realized that I needed to adjust my technique or I was going to pay for it later. Injury can result from repetitive movements with a general lack of awareness and variability in movement and may be prevented with some easy steps.  Read more

 

3. FAQ About 3 of the Most Common Knee Conditions

Written by Evergreen Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout MI.

The knee is the largest and one of the most complex joints in the body. It primarily joins the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia), but also includes the kneecap (patella) and fibula in the lower leg. These bones and the muscles that surround them are connected through a series of ligaments, tendons, and cartilage (menisci) which collectively stabilize the knee and allow it to bend, twist, and rotate…  Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Vestibular Physical Therapy

Vestibular Physical Therapy

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Vestibular Physical Therapy

Vestibular Dysfunction

It is estimated that 35% of adults aged 40 years or older in the U.S. have experienced some sort of vestibular dysfunction — approximately 69 million Americans. Many people who suffer from acute dizzy spells can be helped by physical therapy. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by a brief episode of vertigo (spinning) every time your head moves into a specific position. Common causes for this disorder are trauma to the head (concussion, motor vehicle accident, etc.) and acute infection, but frequently the cause is unknown. Patients usually complain of a spinning sensation being provoked by lying down, rolling over in bed, bending over, or looking up. Common activities that can provoke this sensation include getting out of bed, gardening, washing hair in the shower, and going to the dentist or beauty parlor.

vertigo diagram

Common Symptoms

  • Vertigo: The perception of movement/spinning, either of the self or the environment
  • Dizziness: General term that describes light-headedness, floating sensation, or faintness
  • Imbalance: Disequilibrium is a feeling of being off-balance or a loss of equilibrium

 

Uncommon Symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Blurred vision
  • Anxiety
  • Lack of coordination
  • Difficulties with memory and concentration
  • Headaches/neck pain

 

How Do You Know if You Need Vestibular Therapy?

80% of older adults over the age of 65 have experienced dizziness with 50% being due to Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV).

  • Do you feel unsteady?
  • Do you lose your balance and fall?
  • Do you feel like you are falling, the room is spinning, or get dizzy when you lay down?
  • Do you like you are moving when you are standing or sitting still?
  • Do you feel light-headed?
  • Do you have blurred vision?
  • Do you ever feel disoriented, such as losing your sense of time or where you are?
  • Or if you’ve been diagnosed with BPPV, labyrinthitis, vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s syndrome, migraine-related dizziness, cervicogenic dizziness

Video provided by Advance Rehabilitation (GA)

What to Expect from Vestibular Physical Therapy?

Our goal for vestibular physical therapy patients is to decrease feelings of vertigo and dizziness, improve balance, posture control, gaze stability, overall endurance, and conditioning, and increase safety.

We use exercises that provide small, controlled, and repeated “doses” of the movements and activities that provoke dizziness to de-sensitize and fine-tune the brain. Physical therapists provide comprehensive Balance and Vestibular Rehabilitation. They perform specific treatment protocols for specific diagnoses, with a focus on alleviation of symptoms and return of function. Treatment for vestibular rehabilitation may include, but is not limited to:

  • Patient Education
  • Home Exercise Program
  • Repositioning Maneuvers
  • Habituation Exercises
  • Balance Exercises
  • Conditioning Exercises
  • Functional Activities

 

When you Go for a Vestibular Physical Therapy Visit

  • Wear comfortable clothes that allow you to move freely
  • Bring a list of your current medications, especially those prescribed for your s/s
  • You may experience dizziness or an increase in symptoms initially. If possible, have someone with you for the first couple of appointments to assist you home if needed

For more information about vestibular disorders and vertigo, please don’t hesitate to reach out to any of our highly trained teams of physical therapists nationwide. We are here and ready to help.

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Information for this post provided by Agility Spine & Sports Physical Therapy (locations throughout Tucson, AZ)