Tag Archives: dehydration

Hot Weather Exercise Tips

Hot Weather Exercise Tips

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Hot Weather Exercise Tips

As the temperatures continue to rise, we have decided to put together a few hot weather exercise tips to consider while staying active and for staying hydrated through the summer.

Set your alarm: Sunrise is generally the coolest time of day, so get up and get out early. It may be more humid, but it is generally still hot at sunset because the ground radiates accumulated heat.

Hydrate: It is recommended to drink at least eight ounces of liquids prior to heading outside to exercise and 6-8 ounces of fluids every 15 minutes, switching between water and an electrolyte drink. Remember to drink plenty of fluids post exercise to speed recovery.

  • Remember to drink water and other fluids throughout the day. Carry a water bottle with you or grab a drink each time you pass a water fountain.
  • Drink 16oz of fluid 2-3 hours before exercise
  • Drink an additional 10oz of fluid 10-20 minutes before exercise
  • Consume 20-40oz of fluid for every hour of exercise
  • Always have water available. Take a bottle to work, the gym or wherever you are headed, and remember to use it.
  • Drink up any time you are in the sun. Just being outside can lead to dehydration
  • Children and the elderly are more susceptible to dehydration
  • Finally don’t rely on thirst as a signal to drink water. Thirst is actually a sign that the body is under stress and by the time you feel thirsty, dehydration has already begun to set in. Other symptoms of dehydration include dry mouth, irritability, headache, weakness, dizziness, cramps, nausea and fatigue. Even mild dehydration can lead to diminished performance, elevation of core body temperature and increased cardiovascular strain.

Acclimatize: It is advisable to gradually build up your tolerance for exercising in warmer conditions

Wear Technical Fabrics: Technical fabrics wick sweat from your body to keep you cool. Also, wear a visor to keep sun out of your eyes, not a hat, which traps the heat.

Slow Down: For every 5 degree rise in temperature above 60 degrees F, slow down your activity intensity by 5%

Protect: Use sunscreen to protect your skin and prevent sunburn.

Be realistic: Do not overestimate your level of physical fitness; set realistic exercise goals.

Sports Drinks

Hydration & Supplements: Sports Drinks vs. Energy Drinks

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It’s important to stay hydrated during physical activity. While water is still the best choice for hydration, other acceptable options are available. Do you know what is most effective for your workout?

Sports Drinks
Sports drinks are ideal for athletes looking to hydrate and replenish after long, intensive exercise (usually greater than 60 minutes). Sports drinks contain a combination of electrolytes, carbs, minerals, and vitamins. This combination of nutrients serve to restore lost fluid and sodium levels. Additionally, the sugary carbs found in sport drinks provide athletes a boost of natural energy to aid in recovery.

hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

Energy Drinks
Energy drinks are never a good option for athletes. While these beverages do provide an apparent energy boost, the effects are temporary. Energy drinks contain few helpful macronutrients, like carbs, and instead use the stimulant caffeine to create an artificial boost of energy. These high concentrations of caffeine can act as a diuretic thus increasing dehydration risks. Too much caffeine can also cause jitters, dizziness and headaches leading to decreased performance. High doses of caffeine have been linked to cardiac emergencies.

Chocolate Milk?
Effectively recover with chocolate milk. Low-fat chocolate milk makes a simple yet effective post-workout snack. Offering just the right mix of carbs and protein, this tasty drink refuels your body and helps muscles through recovery. Drink up!

Out Smart Muscle Cramps:
Painful muscle cramps can quickly sideline an athlete. While the root cause is still being researched, dehydration, muscle imbalances and improper warm-up are likely factors. Follow these basics to help prevent muscle cramps:

  • Stay hydrated, make sure your athlete does not start the practice/game dehydrated.
  • Pack a refillable water bottle to drink throughout the day.
  • Consume a balanced diet with healthy amounts of sodium.
  • Bolster weak muscle groups with functional, plyometric and strength training.
  • Practice foam rolling and static stretching in tight areas.
  • Incorporate a dynamic warmup.

Written by the Therapy Team at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, Michigan.
To learn more about the Center for Physical Rehabilitation click here.

postural hypotension PTandMe

Postural Hypotension: What It Is and How to Manage It

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Postural hypotension (or orthostatic hypotension) is when your blood pressure drops when you go from lying down to sitting up or from sitting to standing. When your blood pressure drops, less blood can go to your organs and muscles. This can make you likely to fall.

What are the symptoms?
Although many people with postural hypotension have no symptoms, others do. These symptoms can differ from person to person and may include:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Feeling about to faint, passing out or falling
  • Headaches, blurry or tunnel vision
  • Feeling vague or muddled
  • Feeling pressure across the back of your shoulders or neck
  • Feeling nauseous or hot and clammy
  • Weakness or fatigue

When do symptoms tend to happen?
When standing or sitting up suddenly

  •  In the morning when blood pressure is naturally lower
  • After a large meal or alcohol
  • During exercise
  • When straining on the toilet
  • When you are ill
  • If you become anxious or panicky

What causes postural hypotension?
Postural hypotension may be caused by or linked to:

  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes, heart failure, atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries
  • Taking some diuretics, antidepressants or medicines to lower blood pressure
  • Neurological conditions like Parkinson’s disease and some types of dementia
  • Dehydration
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency or anemia
  • Alcoholism
  • Prolonged bed rest

What can I do to manage my postural hypotension?

  • Tell your healthcare provider about any symptoms
  • Ask if any of your medicines should be reduced or stopped
  • Get out of bed slowly. First sit up, then sit on the side of the bed, then stand up
  • Take your time when changing position, such as when getting up from a chair
  • Try to sit down when washing, showering, dressing or working in the kitchen
  • Exercise gently before getting up (move your feet up and down and clench and unclench your hands) or after standing (march in place)
  • Make sure you have something to hold onto when you stand up
  • Do not walk if you feel dizzy
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water or low-calorie drinks each day, unless you have been told to limit your fluid intake
  • Avoid taking very hot baths or showers
  • Try sleeping with extra pillows to raise your head

This information was written by Proactive Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy clinic in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. At ProActive Physical Therapy, their number one priority is the patient. They strive to provide individualized treatment with hands-on, compassionate care. They do not rush their patients or their clinicians. Rather, they perform comprehensive evaluations and encourage patient input for treatment planning and goal setting. For more information click here.

healthy start

A Healthy Start in 2017

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It’s time to get a healthy start in 2017!  We provided some general health and wellness tips to get you on your way to an amazing year!  We call it the Pearls of Longevity!

PROTEIN
Eat 25 grams of protein each meal especially breakfast to prevent being hungry from carb cravings and crashes, help maintain and build muscle, and improve your immune system.

DID YOU KNOW?
For every 100 calories of protein you eat, it takes 25 calories to digest meaning you really only ate 75 calories! This is a 25% discount! For carbs and fat, you get less than a 10% discount.

EXERCISE
Exercise at least 30 minutes a day to burn calories and decrease stress. Lift weights or use body weight strengthening exercises to increase lean muscle and boost your metabolism.

DID YOU KNOW?
Exercise relieves symptoms of depression as well or even better than medication. Losing 10 lbs. decreases your risk of knee arthritis by 50%, while losing 10% of your body weight decreases joint pain by 50%!

ANTI INFLAMMATORY & ANTIOXIDANT-RICH FOODS
Fill half your plate at every meal to ensure you eat enough of these power foods.

DID YOU KNOW?
Eating lots of fruits, vegetables, nuts, olive oil, beans, salmon, spices, and even dark chocolate helps reduce inflammation and stress, decreases joint and muscle pain, and reduces your risk heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, cancer and stroke.

pushup_woman

RELAXATION & STRESS REDUCTION
Practice inhaling slowly through your nose until you feel your belly button move out and then slowly exhale through your mouth feeling your belly button move in. Practice at least 5 minutes a day while driving, at your computer, while watching TV or when in bed. Smile, laugh and hug someone once a day.

DID YOU KNOW?
Deep breathing reduces stress, muscle pain, and blood pressure, while improving memory, concentration and performance. Happiness and affection are considered by many experts to be the fountain of youth as it lowers stress and releases hormones that help fight aging.

LIQUIDS
Drink 2 cups of water or tea when you wake up and drink 1-2 cups in between meals. Coffee does not count as it can lead to dehydration.

DID YOU KNOW?
Water reduces hunger, improves metabolism, brings nutrients, and hydrates your muscles and connective tissue. This can reduce inflammation and scar tissue which can lead to decreased muscle and joint pain.

SLEEP
Sleep at least 7-8 hours per night consistently going to bed and waking up the same time even on weekends.

DID YOU KNOW?
Sleep releases growth hormone which helps keep you young, increase lean muscle and decrease body fat!

A healthy start can lead to great endings. Best of luck to you and yours and Happy New Year!

winter safety tips

Winter Safety Tips for Children

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winter safety tips for Children PTandMe
When the temperature drops and snow is on the ground, your children can still benefit from some outdoor physical activity. All it takes is a little extra planning to stay safe.

Layer Up!
Infants and children lose heat more quickly due to their size. As a result, they are more likely to suffer from low body temperature, also known as hypothermia. Dressing in layers is a good way to provide your child with added warmth during the winter months. Your child should wear 1 more layer than an adult would wear. Choose fabrics that wick moisture to help pull sweat away from your child’s skin and keep them warm.

Here are some other winter stafety tips to help keep your child safe in the cold:
• Mittens are warmer, but gloves allow your child to use their fingers more. Consider having your child wear mittens over a pair of light gloves.
• Keep your child’s feet warm and dry with 2 pairs of socks.
• Avoid long scarves and drawstrings or ties, which could become a choking hazard. Consider neck warmers or turtleneck garments.
• Choose hats and hoods that do not obstruct your child’s vision.
• Keep a dry set of clothing at school in the event your child’s clothes become wet.

Winter Sport Safety
Winter safety tips for sports such as skiing, skating, snowboarding, and sledding require adult supervision and added safety measures. To help keep your child safe:
• Make sure your child wears a helmet and other protective gear such as wrist guards for snowboarding and a mouth guard for ice hockey.
• Teach your child to be aware of and avoid hazards when sledding such as cars, trees, and ponds.
• Do not allow your child to skate on surfaces until you are sure the water is frozen solid.
• Do not allow your child to wear headphones while playing. Headphones will block traffic or grooming machine sounds.
• Encourage your child to keep moving when outdoors to help generate body heat.

Bring your child inside at the first sign of frostnip—skin that is red, numb, and tingly. Soak your child’s skin in warm water until the symptoms go away. Do not rub the skin. If symptoms do not improve, call your child’s doctor. If your child’s skin becomes white, hard, and swollen, your child may have frostbite. The skin may also burn, tingle, or become numb. If you think your child has frostbite, bring your child inside and put your child in dry clothes. Do not rub the skin, rubbing can cause more damage. Call for medical help right away.

hockey_player

Don’t Skip the Sunscreen
It is possible for your child to get a sunburn in the winter since sunlight reflects off of the snow and ice. Your child should use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. Apply it to your child 20 minutes before going outside and reapply it every 2 hours.

Fuel Up for Fun
Dehydration can contribute to hypothermia. Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids, especially during vigorous physical activities. Your child will also need to fuel up to generate body heat needed for outdoor play. Provide your child with plenty of healthy snacks such as trail mix, fruit and bread.

When to Play
Freezing temperatures and wind are risk factors for hypothermia and frostbite. Avoid severe cold. Keep an eye on weather forecasts and plan outdoor activities for warmer days without snow or rain.

Following these winter safety tips will allow you and your child to safely enjoy the beauty of winter.

by Cynthia M. Johnson, MA

RESOURCES:
Family Doctor—American Academy of Family Physicians
http://familydoctor.org

Healthy Children—American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.healthychildren.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Canadian Paediatric Society
http://www.cps.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:

Chillin’ with winter safety. Healthy Children—American Academy of Pediatrics website. Available at: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Chillin-With-Winter-Safety.aspx. Updated January 19, 2016. Accessed February 11, 2016.

Frostbite in children. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford website. Available at: http://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=frostbite-in-children-90-P02820. Accessed February 11, 2016.

Keeping kids safe in the cold. American Academy of Pediatrics website. Available at: http://www2.aap.org/sections/schoolhealth/ECarchivenovember11.html. Accessed February 11, 2016.

Sunscreen FAQs. American Academy of Dermatology website. Available at: https://www.aad.org/media-resources/stats-and-facts/prevention-and-care/sunscreens. Accessed February 11, 2016.

Last reviewed February 2016 by Michael Woods, MD Last Updated:10/20/2014

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

For more winter safety tips to keep you out of harm’s way this season check the articles below!

Staying Warm in Winter PTandMe  snow shoveling safety PTandMe  

More Enjoyable Bike Ride

8 Tips for a More Enjoyable Bike Ride

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Optimizing your bike and clothing isn’t just for competitive racers. Even if you’re just looking to ride a few miles recreationally, you can be more comfortable and have more fun by following our tips for a more enjoyable bike ride!

1. Check Tire Pressure
If your tires are too soft, you have a much higher chance of “pinching” a tube, causing a flat. Low pressure also increases rolling resistance, making it more difficult for you to ride at a normal speed. Check the sidewall of your tires for recommended pressure range; it doesn’t need to be at the maximum, but be sure it’s at or above the minimum.

2. Seat Angle
Everyone has a different preference on exact seat angle and position, but it should be roughly level. Deviations of 1-2 degrees up or down are OK, but don’t point up or down too much. This can place unnecessary pressure on pelvic soft tissue or the hands/wrists.

3. Seat Height
An old belief about seat height was that you must be able to touch the ground with both feet when sitting on the saddle. If you are very new to cycling, this does improve your ability to stay upright at very slow speeds. However, a seat that is too low can put excess pressure on your knees and back, and is less efficient. A “proper” seat height has the knee at about 30 degrees of bend at the lowest point in the pedal stroke.

4. Stay Hydrated
Carry water with you on any ride longer than 30 minutes (shorter in hot conditions). You can use a backpack-style hydration pack, or a simple water bottle and cage. Almost all bicycles have bolts to hold a water bottle cage. Whichever method you choose, get familiar with it and get in the habit of using it often.

5. Know How to Change a Tube
Carry the items needed to replace a tube in the event of a flat tire. Your local bike shop can help you with choosing these items. These can all be carried in a bag under your seat. You don’t need to be Nascar pit-crew-fast at it, but you want to know how to fix a flat tire so you don’t end up stranded.

6. Like Lycra
Very few people think of bike shorts as a good fashion statement. However, if you’re riding more miles, especially in warm weather, they provide comfort that can’t be matched with basketball or running shorts.

7. Be Visible
Along with the bike shorts, make sure your t-shirt or jersey is a bright color that will keep you visible in traffic. If there is a chance you’ll be riding near or at dark, be sure to have at least a rear and preferably also a front light on your bicycle.

8. Riding Shouldn’t Hurt
Sure, if you’re looking to get a hard workout or ride fast, your legs will feel the burn. However, if your body and bike are working together properly, riding shouldn’t cause any joint pain. If you can’t ride without getting neck, back, hip or knee pain, consider having a professional look at either your body or your bike fit. Better yet, have a physical therapist who is versed in bike fitting address both at the same time. The answer to most aches and pains is rarely just in one area (bike fit or body work), and a combined approach will usually work best for alleviating pain and getting the most out of your ride.

bike_couple

Let Physical Therapy help you before your pain turns into an injury.

What an ache tells you:
•  It’s the first clue your body is telling you something is wrong.
•  Your body can accommodate to the ache, but eventually a breakdown will happen.
•  While you accommodate to your ache, weakness and lack of flexibility starts.
•  Once you have a breakdown, pain will happen and more than likely you will stop doing the activities you currently enjoy.

How physical therapy can help prevent sports injuries:
•  Modify exercise routines when you have a minor ache and pain (This does not always mean you need to stop exercising!)
•  Get assessed for weakness and flexibility issues to address biomechanical deficits.
•  Educate on faulty or improper posture or body mechanics during exercise
•  Educate and help with technique on exercises that help your muscles stretch farther. Flexibility training helps prevent cramps, stiffness, and injuries, and can give you a wider range of motion.
•  Correct muscle imbalances through flexibility and strength training.
•  Alleviate pain.
•  Correct improper movement patterns.

Common Cycling-related pain and injuries that Physical Therapy can treat:
•  Low Back Pain
•  Neck Pain
•  Foot numbness
•  Shoulder pain
•  Muscle strains
•  Hand pain/numbness

This information about having a more enjoyable bike ride was written by Advanced Physical Therapy, a physical therapy group that uses progressive techniques and technologies to stay on the forefront in their field. Their staff is committed to providing patients with advanced healing techniques. For more information click here.

dehydration

Hydration: What, When and How Much

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FLUID INTAKE IS ESSENTIAL TO GOOD HEALTH.

Water is needed to regulate your temperature, maintain joint health and to deliver essential vitamins and minerals. Dehydration leads to impaired nerve and muscle function due to the imbalance of sodium and potassium within the body. Brain and muscle function become impaired causing decreased muscle coordination and impaired athletic performance.

Early signs and symptoms of dehydration include headaches, dry mouth, chills, dry skin, excessive thirst, and fatigue. The color of ones urine is a good indicator of proper hydration. Improper hydration will cause your urine to become a dark yellow. Signs of worsening dehydration are increased body temperature, heart rate and body temperature. If you become confused, have vision disturbances and difficulty breathing seek immediate medical attention.

Your risk of dehydration increases when you sweat excessively, increase your exercise intensity and duration, when the temperature is high and at high altitudes.

The American Council on Fitness suggests these guidelines for moderate to high intensity exercise:
• Drink 17-20 ounces of water two to three hours before the start of exercise.
• Drink 8 ounces of fluid 20 to 30 minutes prior to exercise or during warm-up.
• Drink 7-10 ounces of fluid every 10 to 20 minutes during exercise.
• Drink an additional 8 ounces of fluid within 30 minutes after exercising.
• Drink 16-24 ounces of fluid for every pound of body weight lost after exercise.

WOW THAT IS A LOT!

But it shows us how much fluid we can lose during higher levels of exercise and why it is so important to stay hydrated. It is very important to drink water before, during and after practices and games especially in the warmer months.

Many sports teams will weigh the athletes before and after practice to determine the amount of fluid lost. The recommended weight loss limit due to fluid loss is 2% of your own body weight per day. It is recommended that you drink 16-24 ounces of water for every pound lost.

water bottle

ARE SPORTS DRINKS BETTER THAN WATER?

Definitely in taste but nothing hydrates the body better than water. Sports drinks do provide more potassium, minerals and other electrolytes which will help you sustain your performance during exercise and may help you recover quicker especially in workouts over one hour in duration. The biggest problem with sports drinks is the sugar content. Many of them have multiple servings per bottle. Glucose is essential but you do not need as much as you will find in most sports drinks. I recommend a combination of water and a low sugar sports drink. Research also indicates that chocolate milk may help the athlete recover more quickly when consumed after exercise due to its carbohydrate and protein content.

You should consult your pediatrician or family physician if you feel that you or your child has problems with dehydration.

This information was written by Evergreen Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group located in Saginaw Valley, Michigan. At Evergreen Physical Therapy, their physical therapy clinics use progressive techniques and technologies to stay on the forefront in their field. Their licensed physical and occupational therapists are committed to providing patients with advanced healing techniques.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics.

ThinkstockPhotos-83405489
1.Degenerative Disc Disease and the Role of Physical Therapy
Written by the therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy

The symptoms of degenerative disc disease are varied but regardless, it can limit the patient’s mobility and ability to perform daily activities. Painkillers can help patients with degenerative disc disease but they also benefit from physical therapy. Let’s take a look on the role of Oregon Spine & Physical Therapy in Eugene, Oregon in managing degenerative disc disease. Read More

 

ThinkstockPhotos-76756242
2. Early Signs of Dehydration

Written by the therapy team at ARCH Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine

You have commonly heard the phrase, “MAKE SURE YOU ARE DRINKING ENOUGH WATER.” Hydration is important for the body not only as a daily practice, during physical activity, but also plays an important role in the aid of weight loss. The human body is made up of approximately 50-75% water. The percentage of water varies based on age and gender. Read More

 

ThinkstockPhotos-174239890
3. You Win Some, You Lose Some- Lessons Learned as a Marathon Walker
Written by Tiffany Basore PT, DPT at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation

Growing up I was an athlete. While being a perfectionist and competitive by nature helped me reach some goals, it has also held me back. There were times in my life where I avoided things because I was afraid to fail. In 2009, I took a chance and trained for a ½ marathon. Despite playing multiple sports, long distance running has never been “my thing”. I was nervous to participate for fear of failure, but I put these thoughts aside and I trained. I followed a plan, I was consistent, and I didn’t get hurt. When race day rolled around I was nervous but I felt I had prepared well. I had been experiencing some mild health issues at the time which had altered my diet, but I didn’t worry too much about it. I woke up the morning of the race with my legs feeling like lead. I attributed this to being nervous and over-thinking things. I started the race hoping I just needed to get into my rhythm, but I never did. I trudged on for 12 of the 13.1 miles willing my non-cooperative body to keep moving. Just past mile 12, there was a hill. I knew there was no way my body would carry me to the finish line if I tried to run up it. My entire body was letting me down in a way it never had during any of my training runs. As I began to walk, a medic asked if I was okay. I stubbornly said yes, but when asked to walk a straight line, I couldn’t come close. He checked my blood pressure, oxygen, and blood sugar, all of which were too low. I had to stop. My body had failed me. I had failed. Read More

Early Signs of Dehydration

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Senior Man Relaxing After Exercise

You have commonly heard the phrase, “MAKE SURE YOU ARE DRINKING ENOUGH WATER.” Hydration is important for the body not only as a daily practice, during physical activity, but also plays an important role in the aid of weight loss. The human body is made up of approximately 50-75% water. The percentage of water varies based on age and gender.

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