Tag Archives: muscles

shin splints

7 Ways Physical Therapists Treat Shin Splints

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shin splints

Here are 7 ways a physical therapist can help treat pain and symptoms associated with shin splints:

Pain Reduction: The RICE principle is the first step to recovery (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Manual therapy and Kinesiotaping may also be used to speed up recovery and reduce swelling.

Gait and Footwear Analysis: An analysis of how a person walks and runs in an important part of treatment. The wrong mechanism of walking can transmit a great deal of force through the shin to the knee and hip. In such situations, physical therapists will correct gait patterns and recommend footwear with shock absorbing capacity.

Muscle Stretches and Strengthening: The tibial and peroneal muscles are attached to the shin and must be stretched adequately before any form of exercise. Physical therapy includes various stretches of the goot that will help stretch and warm up these muscles. Strengthening damaged muscles can also help.

 Activity Modification:  Physical therapists may suggest alternative activities to minimize stress on the shinbones. These can include swimming and cycling.

Increase Range of Motion (ROM): Exercises for the hip, knee, ankle and foot improve blood circulation, reduce inflammation and relieve pain. A home exercise program may also be implemented.

Arch Support:  The absence or collapse of a normal foot arch can lead to shin splints. Physical therapists will recommend appropriate orthotics that can be custom made for the patient and provide the appropriate amount of arch support.

Return to Sport: If you are an athlete, your therapist may tailor exercises that are specific to strengthening the areas needed to perform your sport. Modified use of your muscles may also be discussed and implemented. Return to your sport may be gradual to prevent re-injury.

To learn more about shin splints please visit our PT & Me injury center on this website by clicking here.

postural hypotension PTandMe

Postural Hypotension: What It Is and How to Manage It

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Postural hypotension (or orthostatic hypotension) is when your blood pressure drops when you go from lying down to sitting up or from sitting to standing. When your blood pressure drops, less blood can go to your organs and muscles. This can make you likely to fall.

What are the symptoms?
Although many people with postural hypotension have no symptoms, others do. These symptoms can differ from person to person and may include:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Feeling about to faint, passing out or falling
  • Headaches, blurry or tunnel vision
  • Feeling vague or muddled
  • Feeling pressure across the back of your shoulders or neck
  • Feeling nauseous or hot and clammy
  • Weakness or fatigue

When do symptoms tend to happen?
When standing or sitting up suddenly

  •  In the morning when blood pressure is naturally lower
  • After a large meal or alcohol
  • During exercise
  • When straining on the toilet
  • When you are ill
  • If you become anxious or panicky

What causes postural hypotension?
Postural hypotension may be caused by or linked to:

  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes, heart failure, atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries
  • Taking some diuretics, antidepressants or medicines to lower blood pressure
  • Neurological conditions like Parkinson’s disease and some types of dementia
  • Dehydration
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency or anemia
  • Alcoholism
  • Prolonged bed rest

What can I do to manage my postural hypotension?

  • Tell your healthcare provider about any symptoms
  • Ask if any of your medicines should be reduced or stopped
  • Get out of bed slowly. First sit up, then sit on the side of the bed, then stand up
  • Take your time when changing position, such as when getting up from a chair
  • Try to sit down when washing, showering, dressing or working in the kitchen
  • Exercise gently before getting up (move your feet up and down and clench and unclench your hands) or after standing (march in place)
  • Make sure you have something to hold onto when you stand up
  • Do not walk if you feel dizzy
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water or low-calorie drinks each day, unless you have been told to limit your fluid intake
  • Avoid taking very hot baths or showers
  • Try sleeping with extra pillows to raise your head

This information was written by Proactive Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy clinic in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. At ProActive Physical Therapy, their number one priority is the patient. They strive to provide individualized treatment with hands-on, compassionate care. They do not rush their patients or their clinicians. Rather, they perform comprehensive evaluations and encourage patient input for treatment planning and goal setting. For more information click here.