Tag Archives: pain

shin splints

7 Ways Physical Therapists Treat Shin Splints

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shin splints

Here are 7 ways a physical therapist can help treat pain and symptoms associated with shin splints:

Pain Reduction: The RICE principle is the first step to recovery (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Manual therapy and Kinesiotaping may also be used to speed up recovery and reduce swelling.

Gait and Footwear Analysis: An analysis of how a person walks and runs in an important part of treatment. The wrong mechanism of walking can transmit a great deal of force through the shin to the knee and hip. In such situations, physical therapists will correct gait patterns and recommend footwear with shock absorbing capacity.

Muscle Stretches and Strengthening: The tibial and peroneal muscles are attached to the shin and must be stretched adequately before any form of exercise. Physical therapy includes various stretches of the goot that will help stretch and warm up these muscles. Strengthening damaged muscles can also help.

 Activity Modification:  Physical therapists may suggest alternative activities to minimize stress on the shinbones. These can include swimming and cycling.

Increase Range of Motion (ROM): Exercises for the hip, knee, ankle and foot improve blood circulation, reduce inflammation and relieve pain. A home exercise program may also be implemented.

Arch Support:  The absence or collapse of a normal foot arch can lead to shin splints. Physical therapists will recommend appropriate orthotics that can be custom made for the patient and provide the appropriate amount of arch support.

Return to Sport: If you are an athlete, your therapist may tailor exercises that are specific to strengthening the areas needed to perform your sport. Modified use of your muscles may also be discussed and implemented. Return to your sport may be gradual to prevent re-injury.

To learn more about shin splints please visit our PT & Me injury center on this website by clicking here.

When Is the Time Right for Physical Therapy?

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physical therapy

Often, we end up in physical therapy based on the referral of our physician after dealing with and injury for a certain period of time. However, physical therapy can be used for many different ailments and can actually help cut down the time off work, off of sports and promote healing much faster.

Physical therapy can be used for many of your minor and major injuries. Following surgeries or traumas (accidents, dislocations, fractures, sprains) it can cause a considerable reduction in swelling and allow things to heal 75-80% faster than if without therapy. It has been shown that following surgery, the quicker someone goes for therapy, the less likely they are to stiffen up or have complications due to loss of range of motion. It also helps to significantly reduce pain and swelling.

Physical therapy is not only used following surgeries or sports injuries, but can be extremely helpful in preventing symptoms from getting worse and developing into more problems. If you’ve been having pain in your shoulder for 3 months or so, your body now has altered the way it moves your shoulder and in turn, you have developed some compensation patterns which could cause things to develop into other areas, such as your neck from your altered movements. This then, can lead to more significant problems which could have been easily avoided if therapy had been started and symptoms had gotten under control.

Remember, the quicker you get into therapy following an injury or persistent pain, the quicker your response time will be to therapy. If you are having some issues, talk to your physician about starting therapy. You don’t have to wait until it has a complete impact on your life or your recreational activities. Stop pain in your life and feel better by visiting one of our PT & Me physical therapists today.

physical therapy knee pain

How Physical Therapy Helps Knee Rehabilitation

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PT&Me Knee Rehabilitation

Physical therapists can provide more than pre/post surgical knee rehabilitation for patients experiencing knee pain.

What Causes Knee Pain?
The knee is a relatively simple joint required to do a complicated job…to provide flexible mobility while bearing considerable weight. While walking down the street, our knees bear three to five times our body weight. When the knee is overstressed in sports or in everyday activities, these structures can break down — and a knee injury occurs.

Common Knee Problems Seen by Our Physical Therapists:

  • Strain / Sprain
  • Arthritis Pain
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Ligament Sprains
  • ACL Tears
  • Tendinitis (ie: Patellar, Pes Anserinus)
  • Chondromalacia Patella
  • Patellofemoral Syndrome / Knee Pain
  • Pre / Post Operative Therapy

How Physical Therapy Provides Knee Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation acutely after knee surgery or a knee injury primarily centers around decreasing swelling in the knee joint. Even a small amount of fluid inhibits the quadriceps muscle on the front of knee by slowing the signal for movement traveling from the brain to the muscle. Manual techniques to decrease muscle spasm and improve length tension relationships of soft tissue are also incorporated. Gradually, exercises to increase strength, range of motion and functional mobility are introduced.

Treatments Offered Include:

  • Comprehensive evaluation with an emphasis on determining the source of the problem
  • Individualized and specific exercise programs
  • Manual therapy (hands-on treatment)
  • Modalities as needed
  • Work and sport specific simulations
  • Progressive home program to help restore independence and self-management

Knee Rehabilitation Goals:

  • Reduce Pain
  • Improve Mobility
  • Movement Awareness/Gait Training
  • Functional Strength
  • Patient Education

For more information on knee injuries visit our PT & Me Knee Injury Center page by clicking here.

The PT & Me Injury Center goes over diagnoses on how physical therapists treat specific injuries.

To find or search for a local participating PT & Me physical therapy clinic in your local area please click here.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. How to Deal with Chronic Joint and Muscle Pain
Written by the Therapy Team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy – Gahanna, OH

All of us have experienced pain and discomfort in the muscles and joints at some point, especially with age. In most cases, the use of over the counter medications, hot/cold packs and rest help resolve the problem. Read more

2. Pain at the Mall
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

As the outside temperatures drop, people contemplating undertaking an exercise program often consider walking at the mall. Benefits include a controlled climate, an absence of traffic, security and easily available restrooms and water. Read more

3. Quality of Care in Rehab
Written by the Ian M. Campbell, DPT at Intermountain Physical Therapy – Boise, ID

What does quality care mean in rehabilitation? One can drive through their city and likely notice multiple physical therapy (PT) clinics. Some may be privately owned and operated, others run by local hospitals. Read more

Physical Therapy Month 2017 – Managing Pain Safely

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This Physical Therapy Month we want patients to try physical therapy first! Physical therapy is a safe non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries.

PHYSICAL THERAPY is a safe and SMART alternative to opioids.

Great candidates to be referred to physical therapy instead of prescribing pain pills include:

  • A patient that has had pain for more than 90 days
  • A patient that complains of pain disturbing their sleep or daily activities
  • A patient that has a history of substance abuse or has been on pain medication for an extended period of time
  • A patient that expresses an interest in avoiding opioids

Try physical therapy and see the difference!

Cancer Fatigue Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy can Help Battle Cancer Related Fatigue

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Should you Consider a Physical Therapy Cancer Fatigue Program?
Cancer treatments are rigorous and can take a toll on the body. If you are feeling tired all the time you’re not alone. The number one complaint of cancer patients, affecting 78% to 96% of those undergoing treatment, is cancer related fatigue(CRF). The goal in Physical Therapy is to help you become as independent as possible. Anyone who experiences signs and symptoms of pain or loss of function would benefit from an individualized physical therapy program.

Physical therapy can help you recover from:
• Chronic pain
• Leg pain
• Shortness of breath after light activity
• Difficulty walking short distance
• Difficulty performing daily tasks
• Extreme weariness and tiredness
• Difficulty paying attention or concentrating

What to Expect from A Physical Therapy Cancer Fatigue Program

Licensed Physical Therapists provide specialized therapeutic services that address the needs of CRF patients. Therapy sessions last approximately thirty minutes to one hour, depending on the patient’s tolerance. The average number of visits per week is 2-3. The physical therapy program is concurrent with the cancer therapy and may last throughout the entire treatment phase. Most programs requires a thorough physical therapy evaluation and a team approach with your physician is maintained.

Consider it a stepping stone approach towards your recovery.
• Address pain—which in turn can alleviate fatigue
• Use non-drug based treatments such as physical modalities:
– Soft tissue & joint mobilization
– TENS
– Heat/Cold
• Coach patient on how to exercise
• Alleviate musculoskeletal dysfunction
• Improve posture
• Combat effects of bed rest
• Help to maintain muscle strength and flexibility, and restore muscle balance
• Help to decrease depression by increasing endorphins
• Improve balance
• Improve endurance
• Core body strengthening

Lady bandana

The Motivation Behind a Cancer Recovery Program
From a physical therapy perspective one of the main reasons for helping cancer patients, comes from seeing individuals for pain problems who were S/P cancer and chemo/radiation. When asked about their the post-treatment care, they said that either; there was none provided, or that they got a few sessions with a lymphedema nurse. Their fatigue and pain symptoms were not addressed.

In looking at what was offered in the community (with the exception of lymphedema nurses) there appeared to be no one addressing the cancer patients—once medical treatment had been completed.

Previous advice for cancer patients was often to get more rest and avoid activities that are physically challenging. Recent studies have shown that exercise was found to be effective in preventing or reducing CRF. No adverse affects from exercising have been reported. Identified as “remarkably under utilized”, exercise is one of the few interventions suggested to diminish CRF and other psychosocial symptoms. If you are struggling to regain your strength and endurance talk to your physical therapist and see if they offer a cancer related fatigue program that can help you get back to doing the things you enjoy.

Information Provided by PTandMe Physical Therapy Partner, Advance Rehabilitation. Advance Rehabilitation has locations throughout GA and Northern FL. More information about Advance Rehabilitation can be found on their website at www.advancerehab.com.

For more information on cancer related physical therapy programs click here:

    
applied functional science AFS

What is Applied Functional Science (AFS)?

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The unique and wholistic practice of Applied Functional Science (AFS) requires extensive education and training beyond the traditional education received by rehabilitation clinicians.

AFS vs. Traditional Therapy

Traditional Therapy
Local Joint Focused

TREATMENTS INCLUDE:
• Focused on correcting the injured joint or muscle
• Therapeutic exercise focused on the muscles around the affected joint
• Manual treatments to improve movement in the affected joint
• Successful treatment evaluated by reduction of pain and improved joint strength

Functional Approach
Whole Body Focused

TREATMENTS INCLUDE:
• Source of pain and cause of pain are rarely the same
• Focused on correcting the underlying cause of the injured joint or muscle
• Therapeutic exercise individual developed based on patient-specific mechanics and affected functional tasks
• Manual treatments utilized to help facilitate normal functional mechanics
• Successful treatment evaluated by restoring pain free function lost due to injury

Body, Mind, and Spirit Do I need a Specialist?
Applied Functional Science (AFS) is a unique approach that uses the collaboration of the physical, biological and behavioral science used to treat patients as a whole. AFS uses biomechanics affected by the everyday forces of life to identify and treat the underlying cause of an injury.

Physical: Functional mechanics of the joints and muscles as they respond to everyday activities

Biological:
Functional application of neuromuscular properties in everyday activities

Behavioral: Why are you here? Incorporating personal driving factors and goals for betterment in your individualized treatment plan

This information was written by Plymouth Physical Therapy Specialists, an outpatient physical therapy group with 17 locations in Michigan. Plymouth Physical Therapy Specialists was established in 1994 by Jeff Sirabian PT, MHS, OCS, Cert. MDT, CSCS. With over 20 years of experience in orthopedics and sports medicine, Jeff has established a state of the art physical therapy practice with 17 locations to conveniently serve you. For more information click here.

PT Month

Physical Therapy: Treating the Cause, Not Just the Symptoms of Pain

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PT_treating the Cause of Pain_FBsize

This PT Month, instead of using prescribed pain killers, try physical therapy first.

WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE PHYSICAL THERAPY OVER PRESCRIPTION PAIN KILLERS
Physical therapy treats the cause of pain, more often than not leaving patients stronger and more able to enjoy life and function fully. In stark contrast, pain relievers treat only the symptoms – and can leave patients dependent or addicted.

drugs

PHYSICAL THERAPY IS THE SMART ALTERNATIVE TO OPIOIDS
More than 40 people die every day from overdoses involving prescription opioids. At least half of opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid.

Wishing everyone a wonderful PT Month!

Information provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. To learn more about the CDC click here.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics.

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1.One Less Headache to Worry About
Written by the therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy

Jaw and head pain can be a real pain in the neck—literally. Did you know that many people suffering from both temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and headaches have postural issues with their cervical spine or neck? This is why we can be an important ally in combating persistent headaches and TMD-related facial pain. Read More

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2. PAIN, NO GAIN. BE NICE TO YOURSELF

Written by Jen Ryskamp at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation

“No pain, no gain”

This is a phrase we have all heard spoken in gyms or on the field especially during particularly difficult workouts. I’m sure you have uttered the phrase a time to two when you felt like giving up on a task that was physically challenging for self-motivation. Cleverly thought up by Jane Fonda in the 1980’s, she used this concept to keep her clientele motivated. Jane was a pioneer in the workout world selling 17 million copies of her aerobic exercise videos, motivating people to get in shape. Her lifetime of physical fitness has paid off. Now in her 70’s, she still has a great physique and carries herself well. Read More

 

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3. 4 Safety Tips for the Weekend Warrior
Written by the therapy Team at Desert Hand Therapy and Physical Therapy

Weekend warrior (noun): a person who participates in an activity only in their spare time.
Every day, approximately 10,000 Americans visit the emergency room for sports or exercise-related injuries. If you are a weekend warrior, it’s important to remember your body can’t go from inactive mode to weekend warrior mode in an instant. Exercise intensity needs to be progressive, or the risk for injury increases. Weekend warriors tend to jump right into an intense activity and bypass preparation. Read More

Understanding Pain

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ThinkstockPhotos-472465430

 

When pain persists and feels like it is ruining your life, it is difficult to see how it can be serving any useful purpose.

But even when pain is chronic and nasty, it hurts because the brain has somehow concluded, often completely subconsciously, that you are threatened and in danger — the trick is finding out why the brain has come to this conclusion.

“So, are you saying that the pain is all in my head?”

Yes — ALL pain is produced by the brain – no brain, no pain!  This does not mean that it is not real – all pain is real.

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