Tag Archives: PT

OT Month 2018

OT Month 2018

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OT Month 2018

Occupational therapists & physical therapists are similar but different.
Here’s why…

Occupational therapy focuses on a person’s ability to perform activities of daily living.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (OT)
mainly focuses on activities of daily living (ADL’s). For example this would mean helping patients to eat and write again after a stroke. OT’s also modify movements or the environment so a patient can complete tasks safely. These modifications help patients lead full and active lives.

PHYSICAL THERAPY (PT)

focuses on treating the injury itself, through the use of orthopedics, manual therapy and modalities. With the goals of reducing pain and improving function.

occupational therapist

Both professions educate patients on wellness and injury prevention. In some cases, like those having suffered a stroke, the patient may see both an OT and PT during recovery.

Occupational therapy is the only profession that helps people across the lifespan to do the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of daily activities (occupations). Occupational therapy practitioners enable people of all ages to live life to its fullest by helping them promote health, and prevent—or live better with—injury, illness, or disability.

Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes. Occupational therapy services typically include:

  • an individualized evaluation, during which the client/family and occupational therapist determine the person’s goals,
  • customized intervention to improve the person’s ability to perform daily activities and reach the goals, and
  • an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met and/or make changes to the intervention plan.

Occupational therapy practitioners have a holistic perspective, in which the focus is on adapting the environment and/or task to fit the person, and the person is an integral part of the therapy team. It is an evidence-based practice deeply rooted in science.

PTandMe

PTandMe and How to Find Physical Therapy Near You

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Find Physical Therapy

PTandMe is your online guide to physical therapy. We make it easy for you to look up common conditions, see how physical therapy will benefit you directly, and most importantly, we make it easy for you to find physical therapy.  If you are in pain, and need to find a licensed physical therapist in your area – we are the best place to look. To learn more about Physical Therapy click here.

The PTandMe injury center is unique in that it provides information on common conditions that physical therapists treat as well as gives you a glimpse into what physical therapy treatment may look like for your condition. Physical therapists are the musculoskeletal experts, so when it comes injury or musculoskeletal pain – you are in the right place. The injury center covers diagnoses from head to toe. To visit the PTandMe injury center click here.

PT & Me

In addition to the injury center, PTandMe sends out great health and wellness tips each month through the Therapy Connection newsletter & weekly PT & Me blog posts.  We partner with over 550 physical therapy clinic nationwide, so the topics covered are relevant and directly from licensed professionals in the field. Featured articles, recipes and fun trivia questions make these resources a great learning tool for everyone.

When it comes to finding physical therapy and scheduling your first appointment, PTandMe makes it easy.  We have collected an online database of our partnering clinics throughout the United States so that you can easily access them from your phone or home computer. To find a physical therapist near you visit our “Find a PT” search page by clicking here.

If you are on the fence about going to physical therapy, or simply want more information about it, PTandMe makes it easy for you to find the information you need quickly. The faster you start to treat pain or an injury, the better the long term benefits, so don’t wait to try physical therapy. Get started today and find physical therapy clinics near you!

Physical Therapy Month 2017 – Managing Pain Safely

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This Physical Therapy Month we want patients to try physical therapy first! Physical therapy is a safe non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries.

PHYSICAL THERAPY is a safe and SMART alternative to opioids.

Great candidates to be referred to physical therapy instead of prescribing pain pills include:

  • A patient that has had pain for more than 90 days
  • A patient that complains of pain disturbing their sleep or daily activities
  • A patient that has a history of substance abuse or has been on pain medication for an extended period of time
  • A patient that expresses an interest in avoiding opioids

Try physical therapy and see the difference!

Physical Therapist

Want to be a Physical Therapist?

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PHYSICAL THERAPIST
WHAT DO THEY DO?
PTs are health care professionals who provide rehabilitation for musculoskeletal issues.
Rehabilitation includes programs focused on:

  • Strengthening
  • Range of motion
  • Balance training
  • Functional training
  • Gait training
  • Return to work programs
  • Pain reduction

Physical therapist’s goal is to return patients to a normal life, that is pain free.

HOW TO BECOME A LICENSED PHYSICAL THERAPIST?
1.) Bachelor’s degree, that includes required Prerequisites for PT schools of your choice.
2.) Doctorate degree from credited school which includes a number of hands on clinical experiences.
3.) Apply & sit for licensure exam in state, you choose to work.

PTleg

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Work as part of the Rehabilitative team to provide physical therapy services under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist.
PTAs implement:

  • Selected components of patient/client interventions (treatment)
  • Obtain data related to the interventions provided
  • Make modifications in selected interventions either to progress the patient/client as directed by the physical therapist

HOW TO BECOME A PTA?
1.) Attend CAPTE – accredited associated program
2.) Apply & sit for licensure exam

JOB SETTINGS: Any setting in which a PTA can work

ATC

CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) are health care professionals who work alongside physicians to provide:

  • Preventative services
  • Emergency care
  • Clinical diagnosis
  • Therapeutic intervention
  • Rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions

Certified Athletic Trainers can help you avoid unnecessary medical treatment and disruption of normal daily life.

HOW DO I BECOME A CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER (ATC)?
1.) Graduate from a bachelors or master’s degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
2.) Pass the certification examination conducted by the Board of Certification (BOC).
3.) Once certified, he/she must meet ongoing continuing education requirements in order to remain certified.
4.) Athletic trainers must also work under the direction of a physician and within their state practice act.

JOB SETTINGS

  • Colleges & Universities
  • Hospital & Clinical
  • Occupational Health
  • Military
  • Performing Arts
  • Physician Extender
  • Professional Sports
  • Public Safety

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations in Georgia and Florida, that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. For more information click here.

PTandMe therapists

Clinic Spotlight: PT & Me Therapists

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This month we are featuring stories from some of our PT & Me therapists. We asked them how they got into the awesome world of physical therapy and what they enjoy about it. These are their stories…

Kelly_wilson
Name:
Kelly Wilson, PT, DPT at University Physical Therapy – 8 locations conveniently located throughout the New River Valley in Virginia

Why did you chose physical therapy as a career?
I took an anatomy class in high school with a teacher who absolutely changed my life. I could not get enough of the curriculum and wanted to learn more about how we work and how we can make ourselves better. I stayed after school one day to ask how I could learn about this topic forever. My teacher suggested that I look into physical therapy. I started shadowing a PT in my hometown and loved it! I was hooked!

What is your favorite thing about going to work each day?
I get to work with the absolute best people on the face of the planet.


Name:
Lea Ann Rumlin, PT, Clinic Owner at DeKalb Comprehensive Physical Therapy – Lithonia, Georgia

Why did you chose physical therapy as a career? 
I had an opportunity to observe a PT in high school and found it was very interesting. I thought it was cool to observe a diverse variety of ailments in people.

What is your favorite thing about going to work each day?
I’ve been doing physical therapy for a long time, but it still feels new. I feel blessed to have the opportunity to help people.


Name:
Wendy Richards, MSPT, DPT at Port City Physical Therapy – Portland, Maine

Why did you chose physical therapy as a career? 
I wanted to be in a helping profession. Growing up in rural Maine most of the careers were either in healthcare or nursing. That is why I was drawn to physical therapy. I especially liked the stroke patient rehab and spinal rehab aspect of it. Helping people with paralysis was especially fulfilling.

What is your favorite thing about going to work each day? 
I enjoy working in a team environment. Working in an outpatient climate and helping patients to get better. Being able to resolve their limitations and improve their lives.


Name:
Jocelyn Zolna-Pitts, PT, Director at Metro Spine & Sports Rehabilitation – Chicago, Illinois

Why did you chose physical therapy as a career?
It combined my interest of medicine with sports. I was always interested in medicine and helping others.

What is your favorite thing about going to work each day?
The daily satisfaction of watching people get better. The challenge and variety of problems patients face and solving their problems through critical thinking with them. I enjoy the fact that you get to play every day at work and it’s a lot of fun!

spine rehabilitation

Spine Rehabilitation and Its Benefits

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31 million Americans experience low-back pain at any given time. Back pain is the most common cause of loss of activity among adults under 45. It’s estimated that over 80% of all American workers suffer back pain at some time during their careers. From chronic to acute back pain, physical therapists are highly trained to accommodate the spine rehabilitation needs of a variety of patients.

COMMON BACK PROBLEMS SEEN BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS INCLUDE:

COMMON CAUSES OF BACK PAIN:
Poor Posture and Body Mechanics
Poor posture is when your spine’s normal curves are either increased or decreased. This puts uneven stress on your spine and all of the supporting tissues. This uneven stress leads to pain and dysfunction and increases the likelihood of injury. The most commonly seen poor posture is a flat low back. Losing your natural low back curve is a major risk for back pain.

Poor Lifting Techniques
Poor lifting techniques is another cause for back problems. The forward bending position with your legs straight puts a great deal of stress on the muscles and ligaments of your back. The discs in your back are also under tremendous strain in this position. This position can increase your chances of ligamentous and muscular strains. It also increases your chances of getting a bulging or herniated disc.

Poor Physical Fitness
Poor physical fitness also contributes to potential back problems. Poorly conditioned muscles lack the strength and endurance that conditioned muscles have. They become fatigued much sooner and cannot provide the type of support a well conditioned muscle can.

back pain

WHAT DOES A SPINE REHABILITATION PROGRAM INVOLVE?
Physical therapists provide a comprehensive approach incorporating manual therapy, prescriptive therapeutic exercise and modalities. A program will improve the patient’s physical condition and symptoms. Therapists also provide the patient with movement awareness, knowledge of safe positions, functional strength, and coordination. All of this promotes the management of low back pain (LBP).

TREATMENTS OFFERED INCLUDE:
• Comprehensive Evaluation with an emphasis on determining the source of the problem.
• Individualized & Specific Exercise Programs
• Manual Therapy (hands-treatment)
• Modalities as Needed
• Progressive Home Program to help restore independence and self-management

GOALS:
• Improve Mobility
• Knowledge of Safe Positions
• Movement Awareness
• Functional Strength
• Coordination

If you have back pain that is prohibiting you from doing the things you enjoy, take the first step towards your recovery and contact your physical therapist.

The Role of Physical Therapy in Sports Medicine

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Sports medicine through physical therapy comes in many forms. Many clinics keep licensed athletic trainers on staff that will go on-site to schools and other sporting events to act as an initial care-giver at the time of an injury. If an injury occurs, your physician may refer you to physical therapy. From there, your physical therapist will have an array of different programs tailored to your specific type of injury, the severity of the injury, and your fitness level. However, you don’t have to wait until you have an injury to get help from a physical therapist. Sometimes the best medicine is prevention.
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