Tag Archives: Sports

Sports Drinks

Hydration & Supplements: Sports Drinks vs. Energy Drinks

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It’s important to stay hydrated during physical activity. While water is still the best choice for hydration, other acceptable options are available. Do you know what is most effective for your workout?

Sports Drinks
Sports drinks are ideal for athletes looking to hydrate and replenish after long, intensive exercise (usually greater than 60 minutes). Sports drinks contain a combination of electrolytes, carbs, minerals, and vitamins. This combination of nutrients serve to restore lost fluid and sodium levels. Additionally, the sugary carbs found in sport drinks provide athletes a boost of natural energy to aid in recovery.

hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

Energy Drinks
Energy drinks are never a good option for athletes. While these beverages do provide an apparent energy boost, the effects are temporary. Energy drinks contain few helpful macronutrients, like carbs, and instead use the stimulant caffeine to create an artificial boost of energy. These high concentrations of caffeine can act as a diuretic thus increasing dehydration risks. Too much caffeine can also cause jitters, dizziness and headaches leading to decreased performance. High doses of caffeine have been linked to cardiac emergencies.

Chocolate Milk?
Effectively recover with chocolate milk. Low-fat chocolate milk makes a simple yet effective post-workout snack. Offering just the right mix of carbs and protein, this tasty drink refuels your body and helps muscles through recovery. Drink up!

Out Smart Muscle Cramps:
Painful muscle cramps can quickly sideline an athlete. While the root cause is still being researched, dehydration, muscle imbalances and improper warm-up are likely factors. Follow these basics to help prevent muscle cramps:

  • Stay hydrated, make sure your athlete does not start the practice/game dehydrated.
  • Pack a refillable water bottle to drink throughout the day.
  • Consume a balanced diet with healthy amounts of sodium.
  • Bolster weak muscle groups with functional, plyometric and strength training.
  • Practice foam rolling and static stretching in tight areas.
  • Incorporate a dynamic warmup.

Written by the Therapy Team at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, Michigan.
To learn more about the Center for Physical Rehabilitation click here.

Physical Therapist

Want to be a Physical Therapist?

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PHYSICAL THERAPIST
WHAT DO THEY DO?
PTs are health care professionals who provide rehabilitation for musculoskeletal issues.
Rehabilitation includes programs focused on:

  • Strengthening
  • Range of motion
  • Balance training
  • Functional training
  • Gait training
  • Return to work programs
  • Pain reduction

Physical therapist’s goal is to return patients to a normal life, that is pain free.

HOW TO BECOME A LICENSED PHYSICAL THERAPIST?
1.) Bachelor’s degree, that includes required Prerequisites for PT schools of your choice.
2.) Doctorate degree from credited school which includes a number of hands on clinical experiences.
3.) Apply & sit for licensure exam in state, you choose to work.

PTleg

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Work as part of the Rehabilitative team to provide physical therapy services under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist.
PTAs implement:

  • Selected components of patient/client interventions (treatment)
  • Obtain data related to the interventions provided
  • Make modifications in selected interventions either to progress the patient/client as directed by the physical therapist

HOW TO BECOME A PTA?
1.) Attend CAPTE – accredited associated program
2.) Apply & sit for licensure exam

JOB SETTINGS: Any setting in which a PTA can work

ATC

CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER
WHAT DO THEY DO?
Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) are health care professionals who work alongside physicians to provide:

  • Preventative services
  • Emergency care
  • Clinical diagnosis
  • Therapeutic intervention
  • Rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions

Certified Athletic Trainers can help you avoid unnecessary medical treatment and disruption of normal daily life.

HOW DO I BECOME A CERTIFIED ATHLETIC TRAINER (ATC)?
1.) Graduate from a bachelors or master’s degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
2.) Pass the certification examination conducted by the Board of Certification (BOC).
3.) Once certified, he/she must meet ongoing continuing education requirements in order to remain certified.
4.) Athletic trainers must also work under the direction of a physician and within their state practice act.

JOB SETTINGS

  • Colleges & Universities
  • Hospital & Clinical
  • Occupational Health
  • Military
  • Performing Arts
  • Physician Extender
  • Professional Sports
  • Public Safety

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations in Georgia and Florida, that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. For more information click here.

Athletic Training Month

March is National Athletic Training Month

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March is National Athletic Training Month! Your protection is our top priority. Athletic trainers are health care for life and sport.

Athletic trainers specialize in patient education, injury prevention, and are an athlete’s first line of defense from the time of injury to recovery. Athletic trainers work closely with coaches and parents and may refer athletes to other health care professionals such as physicians, physical therapists and surgeons when needed.

What is an Athletic Trainer?
Athletic trainers hold at least a four year degree from a BOC (Board of Certification) accredited institution. they are licensed, certified health care professionals working with athletes on and off the field. Generally they are the first responders when injuries occur during sporting events.

Athletic trainers work closely with coaches and parents and will refer athletes to other health care professionals such as physicians, physical therapists and surgeons when needed.

Athletic trainers hours are determined by sports schedules. Typically they are available after school and stay until sporting events have concluded.

For more information about our athletic trainers, and what they do visit NATA’s websites at: www.nata.org or www.atyourownrisk.org

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Four Common Signs of Concussions
Written by the Dustin Blevins, DPT, CSCS at Sports Physical Therapy & Performance Centers – Kirkland, WA

With football season coming to a close you might think the risk of an impact injury like a concussion would be on the decline for winter sports. Read more

2. Early Intervention is the Key to Success
Written by Ben Eggleston, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

The relationship between longevity of symptoms and healing time is of reciprocal proportion? Read more

3. Overtraining Doesn’t Help, It Hurts 
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

Working to achieve a sports or fitness goal can drive many people to overtrain in an effort to get stronger, better, faster. Read more

bone health

Exercise and Bone Health

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Bone is living tissue that is constantly undergoing a process called remodeling. In remodeling, cells called osteoclasts are breaking down old bone, as cells called osteoblasts are replacing it with new tissue. Many factors can affect the remodeling process and leave you with bones that are less dense and more fragile.

Some factors that interfere with bone health and remodeling are:
• Increased age
• Low vitamin D—The body makes vitamin D in response to sunlight. You can also get vitamin D by eating certain kinds of food or by taking a supplement.
• A diet low in calcium
• Smoking
• Lack of exercise—especially weight bearing and resistance exercise

Why Exercise Is Good for Bone Health
Regular weight-bearing and resistance exercise helps build muscle, as well as maintain and increase bone strength. Exercise causes the muscle to contract against the bone. This action stresses or stimulates the bone, and the bone becomes stronger and denser. The 3 main types of exercise are (some activities can be more than 1 type):

Aerobic (Cardiovascular) Exercises to Improve Bone Health
In aerobic exercise, you continually move large muscles in the legs, shoulders, and buttocks. This action causes you to breathe more deeply, and your heart to work harder pumping blood, thereby strengthening your heart and lungs. Examples include:
• Walking
• Jogging
• Running
• Aerobic dance
• Bicycling
• Swimming

Weight-Bearing Exercises to Improve Bone Health
In weight-bearing exercises, your bones and muscles work against gravity, and your feet and legs bear the weight. Your bones adapt to the weight and pull of the muscle during weight-bearing exercise. Examples of weight-bearing exercises include:
• Jogging
• Walking
• Stair climbing
• Dancing
• Soccer

Resistance Exercises to Improve Bone Health (Strength Training)
Resistance exercises use muscle strength to improve muscle mass and strengthen bone. Examples include:
• Weight lifting, using:
• Free weights
• Weight machines
• Elastic tubing

• Calisthenics such as push-ups and chin-ups

tennis guy

Tips for Beginning:
Aerobic or Weight-bearing Exercises to Improve Bone Health
• Warm up for 5 minutes before activity. This can consist of dynamic stretches that involve movement and a light walk.
• Start the activity slowly for the first 5 minutes.
• Slowly increase your intensity so that your heart rate increases. A person doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity can talk. A person doing vigorous-intensity activity cannot say more than a few words without stopping to take a breath.
• Gradually increase your workout until you are working out at least 150 minutes a week at moderate–intensity or 75 minutes a week at vigorous intensity.

Resistance Exercises to Improve Bone Health
• Begin each exercise with light weights and minimal repetitions.
• Slowly (over weeks) increase weight, never adding more than 10% in a given workout.
• Do these exercises 2-3 times a week. Allow for 1 day between each workout for your bones and muscles to rest and repair themselves.
• Gradually increase the number of repetitions to 2-3 sets of 8-10 repetitions with a rest period of 30-60 seconds between sets.
• Although stiffness the day after exercise is normal, if you are in pain, you did too much. Decrease the intensity or the duration of your exercise.

Before starting any type of exercise program, check with your doctor about any possible medical problems you may have that could limit your ability to exercise.

by Mary Calvagna, MS

RESOURCES:
National Osteoporosis Foundation
http://www.nof.org

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition
http://www.fitness.gov

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation
http://www.canorth.org

Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:
2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. US Department of Health and Human Services website. Available at: http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/default.aspx#toc. Published October 2008. Accessed January 21, 2016.

Bone remodeling. University of Washington website. Available at: http://courses.washington.edu/bonephys/physremod.html. Updated March 30, 2007. Accessed January 21, 2016.

How much physical activity do adults need? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed January 21, 2016.

Osteoporosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated October 13, 2015. Accessed January 21, 2016.

Skeleton keys. Smithsonian Museum of Natural History website. Available at: http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/young_old.html. Accessed January 21, 2016.

Last reviewed January 2016 by Michael Woods, MD

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