Tag Archives: The Center for Physical Rehabilitation

athletic trainer

Who is an Athletic Trainer?

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athletic trainer

Athletic trainers hold at least a four year degree from a BOC (Board of Certification) accredited institution. They are licensed, certified health professionals working with athletes on and off the field. Generally they are the first responders when injuries occur during sporting events.

Athletic trainers work closely with coaches and parents and will refer athletes to other health care professionals such as physicians, physical therapists and surgeons when needed.

Athletic trainers hours are determined by sports schedules. Typically they are available after school and stay until sporting events have concluded.

IN THE TRAINING ROOM ATHLETIC TRAINERS

  • Prepare athletes for competition by taking preventative measures such as equipment fitting, taping and bracing
  • Assess athletes with acute and chronic injuries to determine their participation status
  • Perform sport-specific rehabilitation on injured athletes
  • Provide opportunities for strengthening and conditioning
  • Work with sports staff on proper warm up, game day preparation and on/off season conditioning
  • Educate athletes, coaches and parents on sports medicine strategies, nutrition and sports psychology

running back

DURING THE GAME ATHLETIC TRAINERS

  • Support athletes during sporting events
  • Manage any type of musculoskeletal issues including:
  • Shoulder, hip, knee, elbow, hand and ankle injuries
  • Facial injuries
  • Neck and back injuries, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries like concussions
  • Triage and wound care
  • Heat-related illnesses
  • Fractures and dislocations
  • Catastrophic injuries

This information was written by the Center for Physical Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy group with five locations in Western Michigan. The Center specializes in all inclusive physical therapy services, such as: Sports Medicine, Orthopedic Post-Surgical and McKenzie Therapy. Our state-of-the-art facilities are conveniently located around Grand Rapids with extended hours. Independent and locally owned since 1994, we have the freedom to work with the most qualified healthcare professionals. For more information click here.

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

fall

1. Ways to Avoid Taking the Fall?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Each year, injuries from falling afflict many adults— the majority of whom are senior citizens—causing painful fractures and leaving them with severe mobility problems. Read more

aging

2. Healthly and Graceful Aging – Throw Out the Rocking Chair
Written by Colleen Cleves B.S., ACSM Certified Personal Trainer, the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

“Getting old isn’t for sissies.” “Good enough for my age and stage.” “There is no gold in the golden years.” “I shouldn’t be doing that for my age.” Read more

Quality PT

3. Quality of Care in Rehab
Written by Ian M. Campbell, DPT, Intermountain Physical Therapy & Hand Rehabilitation – Boise, ID

What Quality Care Means in Rehabilitation. One can drive through their city and likely notice multiple physical therapy (PT) clinics. Read more

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back

1. My Back Pain Always Returns! What Can I Do?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

After the common cold, the most common reason Americans miss work is back pain. Unfortunately, once you have experienced back strain or injury, it can easily become a recurring problem. Read more

uncommon

2. Uncommon Injury and Treatment Process
Written by Steve Retan AT, ATC, the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Having worked as an athletic trainer for the last 23 years, I have treated and rehabilitated countless injuries.  However there are times that athletes sustain injuries that I have not seen before.  One such injury occurred to a high school hockey player after colliding with an opponent during a game. Read more

ankle

3. Tips for Improving Your Ankle Mobility
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

It’s important for a physically active body to achieve a stable balance between each active joint for maximum performance. In order for all of this to happen, ankle mobility is essential and is the root for several exercises or workouts! Read more

Sports Drinks

Hydration & Supplements: Sports Drinks vs. Energy Drinks

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hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

It’s important to stay hydrated during physical activity. While water is still the best choice for hydration, other acceptable options are available. Do you know what is most effective for your workout?

Sports Drinks
Sports drinks are ideal for athletes looking to hydrate and replenish after long, intensive exercise (usually greater than 60 minutes). Sports drinks contain a combination of electrolytes, carbs, minerals, and vitamins. This combination of nutrients serve to restore lost fluid and sodium levels. Additionally, the sugary carbs found in sport drinks provide athletes a boost of natural energy to aid in recovery.

hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

Energy Drinks
Energy drinks are never a good option for athletes. While these beverages do provide an apparent energy boost, the effects are temporary. Energy drinks contain few helpful macronutrients, like carbs, and instead use the stimulant caffeine to create an artificial boost of energy. These high concentrations of caffeine can act as a diuretic thus increasing dehydration risks. Too much caffeine can also cause jitters, dizziness and headaches leading to decreased performance. High doses of caffeine have been linked to cardiac emergencies.

Chocolate Milk?
Effectively recover with chocolate milk. Low-fat chocolate milk makes a simple yet effective post-workout snack. Offering just the right mix of carbs and protein, this tasty drink refuels your body and helps muscles through recovery. Drink up!

Out Smart Muscle Cramps:
Painful muscle cramps can quickly sideline an athlete. While the root cause is still being researched, dehydration, muscle imbalances and improper warm-up are likely factors. Follow these basics to help prevent muscle cramps:

  • Stay hydrated, make sure your athlete does not start the practice/game dehydrated.
  • Pack a refillable water bottle to drink throughout the day.
  • Consume a balanced diet with healthy amounts of sodium.
  • Bolster weak muscle groups with functional, plyometric and strength training.
  • Practice foam rolling and static stretching in tight areas.
  • Incorporate a dynamic warmup.

Written by the Therapy Team at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, Michigan.
To learn more about the Center for Physical Rehabilitation click here.

shin splints

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flu

1. Resuming Exercise After the Flu Bug
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Flu season is in full swing, and along with the regular flu, the new H1N1 virus is infecting thousands of people. Influenza can be a serious illness. Symptoms include fever, chills, headache, body aches, sore throat , runny nose, dry cough and a general feeling of exhaustion and sickness. Read more

New Year Resolution

2. The New Way to Resolve
Written by Allison Whitteberry, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Cascade

According to Statistic Brain, 41% of Americans usually make New Year resolutions. However, after six months, less then half of those American’s have maintained their resolutions. Read more

Shin Splints

3. What You Need to Know About Shin Splints
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

Shin splints is one of those old health terms that pop up from time to time, like “lumbago.” Lumbago refers to low back pain, which actually can be caused by different things. Read more

labral tear physical therapy

ATC Tip: The Labrum

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Anatomy of the Shoulder
The shoulder can move in almost every plane of motion, it’s the most mobile joint in the human body; but more mobility = more instability. The shoulder joint is often described as a “ball in socket,” but it’s wide range of motion makes it a highly vulnerable joint. We have a network of soft tissue structures, such as the rotator cuff and ligaments, whose main job is to keep the humeral head in its assigned seat. However, often these muscles alone are not sufficient as they can become weak or tight and thus less efficient. The labrum is a small ring of cartilage that provides additional stability to the shoulder joint.

How Does a Labrum Become Damaged?
Direct trauma, shearing forces, or repetitive stress can cause damage to the labrum. Often, this damage will present as a tear in the labrum, which can restrict motion, decrease strength, and cause pain in the shoulder. Picturing that ring of cartilage, imagine a roughening of the edges of the bowl-like golf tee, or even a rip that flaps when the ball is spun around. It is not uncommon for a shoulder dislocation or subluxation to be accompanied by a labral tear; chronic shoulder instability can also lead to labrum injury.

What Does a Labrum Do?
Because the “ball and socket” is so shallow, the shoulder joint is often described, quite accurately, like a “golf ball sitting on a tee.” To picture the shoulder labrum, imagine a ring around the outer edge of a golf tee, effectively deepening the overall bowl shape, almost suctioning the humerus into the space. The labrum helps stabilize the shoulder by making the “ball” more difficult to remove from the “tee.”

How Can I Prevent a Labrum Injury?
The best way to prevent a labral tear is to strengthen the musculature surrounding the shoulder joint. The best case scenario is all of the muscles are working together to keep the shoulder joint moving fluidly through its full range of motion. Important within this group of muscles are the muscle that control the shoulder blades. By strengthening the stabilizing muscles individually and functionally, it helps them stay balanced and strong with the other, stronger muscles (like the RTC). The other way to prevent a labrum tear is to avoid excessive contact, repetitive overhead motions, and falls.

This article about athletic injuries was provided by PT & Me physical therapy partner: The Center for Physical Rehabilitation. More information about the center and their locations throughout Grand Rapids, MI can be found on their website at www.pt-cpr.com

To see a shoulder strengthening program visit our Sports Medicine Tip Page by clicking here.

PT&Me Thanks Our Wonderful Patients

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This Thanksgiving holiday PT&Me is thankful for our patients. Without their support for our physical therapy clinics we wouldn’t have the continued success that we are so thankful for. Here are some of the ways our patients have thanked us for their recovery and well being through their awesome online reviews:

Advance Rehabilitation – Brunswick, GA (click for location details)
“Love the great, friendly, knowledgeable and caring staff! Highly recommend for your needs!”
– Norma Worley (click for review)

Pinnacle Therapy Services – Overland Park, KS (click for location details)
“I’ve had PT at two of the area hospitals and another private facility, and although I had results from all of them, I feel that Pinnacle goes above and beyond in customer service, attitude and demeanor of all therapists, and most importantly, skills and knowledge of said practitioners. Most recently, I worked with Amy and received superior care. The results I received have been the most long-lasting and beneficial.”
– Shawna Deck (click for review)

Port City Physical Therapy – Portland, ME (click for location details)
“The therapists at Port City Therapy are wonderful! They made my time in therapy both fun and informative. I learned what to do to stay healthy for the future. I actually looked forward to each visit.”
– Carole J. (click for review)

The Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI
(click for location details)
“Very caring and competent. Great to work with. I have used them multiple times. Always pleased.”
– Larry Pieniazek (click for review)

Plymouth Physical Therapy Specialists – Jackson, MI (click for location details)
“This is a great facility with a friendly and professional staff. Everyone seems to go above and beyond to address patient needs in a highly personalized manner. That means so much when you are trying to get back in tip top shape. I will definitely recommend to any of my family or friends requiring physical therapy. Thank you guys for your help!”
– Emily A. (click for review)

From all of us at PT & Me we would like to wish you and your family a very happy Thanksgiving!

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Age Appropriate Strength & Performance Training
Written by Joe Chiaramonte AT, ATC, CSCS at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation and Therapy – Grand Rapids, MI

In recent years there has been much discussion on training for our adolescent athletes and what is appropriate, whether it be how much, how soon, how specialized? Read more

2. Breast Cancer Rehabilitation
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics- Northern Virginia

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. Physical Therapy is an integral part of breast cancer rehabilitation. Read more

3. Show Hope Video Shares Impact of STAR Physical Therapy
Written by the Therapy Team at STAR Physical Therapy – Tennessee

STAR Physical Therapy’s mission, To Serve, knows no boundaries. Read more

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Does Wearing a New Knee Brace Help?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Northern Virginia

As the largest joint in the body and because of its exposed position, the knee is especially vulnerable to injury during sports activities. Read more

2. Is Apple Cider Vinegar the Remedy You Need?
Written by the Erin Clason, PT at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation and Therapy – Grand Rapids, MI

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has been used for centuries as a folk remedy to treat everything from warts and the common cold to acid reflux and arthritis. Read more

3. Therapeutic Ultrasound
Written by Angeline Peterson, PT at Intermountain Physical Therapy and Hand Rehabilitation – Meridian, ID

“Are you checking for a foot baby?” That question is not one you may hear very often and may spark further conversation. Read more

strength training

Age Appropriate Strength and Performance Training

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In recent years there has been discussion on training for our adolescent athletes and what is appropriate, whether it be how much, how soon, how specialized? Here are some answers to common strength training questions we hear:

When Can My Athlete Start Lifting Weights?
The NSCA’s position statement states pre-adolescence (7-8 y/o) is a safe age to begin resistance training with graduated modalities and loads. Basically, if the athlete is ready for organized sports, they are ready for some kind of resistance training.

Why Can’t I Just Buy a Blu-Ray Workout for My Adolescent to Train By?
No athlete is the same, and doing a cookie-cutter workout without properly screening for potential injury risk would be negligent. The risk is too great to potentially hurt an athlete by trying to perform exercises their bodies cannot physically handle.

What Should I Look for with Overtraining?
Ongoing decreased performance on field. Often injured or sick. Disengagement from sport and school. Mood swings. Physically tired all the time. Sleep issues. Overreactive emotional response to failure. Depression. Nutrition issues.

A strength training and conditioning specialist can screen each athlete’s movements in order to determine a baseline level of movement and strength. They then develop exercises and drills that will enhance the good movement qualities while addressing any bad motor patterns that may exist. Main components that are often noticed by trained professionals are mobility(flexibility) and stability (strength) issues.

For more on strength & conditioning or to inquire about training with the Center for Physical Rehabilitation at the Academy for Sports & Wellness, please visit: www.pt-cpr.com/academy