Tag Archives: Senior Health

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

fall

1. Ways to Avoid Taking the Fall?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Each year, injuries from falling afflict many adults— the majority of whom are senior citizens—causing painful fractures and leaving them with severe mobility problems. Read more

aging

2. Healthly and Graceful Aging – Throw Out the Rocking Chair
Written by Colleen Cleves B.S., ACSM Certified Personal Trainer, the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

“Getting old isn’t for sissies.” “Good enough for my age and stage.” “There is no gold in the golden years.” “I shouldn’t be doing that for my age.” Read more

Quality PT

3. Quality of Care in Rehab
Written by Ian M. Campbell, DPT, Intermountain Physical Therapy & Hand Rehabilitation – Boise, ID

What Quality Care Means in Rehabilitation. One can drive through their city and likely notice multiple physical therapy (PT) clinics. Read more

Fall Prevention Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy for Balance & Fall Prevention

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“Falls are the leading cause of injury death for Americans 65 years or older. Each year, about 35–40% of adults 65 and older fall at least once.”
— Center for Disease Control

Physical Therapy for Fall Prevention
Physical therapy fall prevention programs are tailored around each individual’s needs. The length of the program is dependent on the severity of the symptoms and the goals of each individual. Most patients will follow a gradual path of three distinct phases. After an initial evaluation to determine needs and goals of patient and we will set up treatment plan with patient input. The first phase typically includes therapeutic interventions designated to decrease symptoms and the establishment of a Home Exercise Program (HEP). We will then Continue the use of therapeutic interventions with the addition of ADL modifications, and energy conservation techniques. Finally we will continue the program until the patient’s goals are met.

The main objectives in a fall prevention program are to:

  • Increase independence with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)
  • Increase independence with functional mobility
  • Decrease fall risk
  • Prevent future fall
  • Increase safety

Pain Relief
Our PTandMe licensed physical therapists are skilled in helping patients significantly reduce the risk of falls so that seniors can continue to age independently. If you or someone you know may benefit from a fall prevention program – call a clinic near you today and see what options are available for you! To find a PTandMe partnering location in your area click here.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

GymBike

1. The Rapid Recovery Blueprint
Written by the Therapy Team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy

Exercise tends to break down muscle fibers while rest allows muscles to recuperate and emerge stronger. The appropriate amount of exercise, followed by recovery leads to an ongoing cycle of improvement over time. Strength and endurance improve, creating a foundation for long-term health. Read more

GymSeniors

2. Can We Get Stronger as We Age?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy

The answer to that question is – absolutely! After age 40 or so, we all begin to lose muscle strength and bone density, and our hormone production slows. Read more

shoulderInjury

3. Overtraining Doesn’t Help, It Hurts
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy

Working to achieve a sports or fitness goal can drive many people to overtrain in an effort to get stronger, better, faster. Our PT’s have seen many injuries related to overtraining. Read more