Tag Archives: CDC

Exercise Diabetes

Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes

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Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes, Healthy Eating

Lifestyle changes play an important role in managing type 2 diabetes. Activity decreases blood glucose and regular exercise helps by improving the way your body uses glucose.It can also reduce the risk of diabetes complications like heart disease.

How it Works
Glucose is a type of sugar that is used for energy. It is present in the blood and stored in the muscle and liver. A hormone called insulin helps most of the glucose move from the blood into cells. For those with type 2 diabetes, the body is resistant to insulin and over time the body has trouble making insulin at all. As a result, glucose has trouble getting to the cells, the body doesn’t get enough energy, and glucose builds up in the blood.

During exercise your working muscles have a greater need for energy and therefore glucose. As a result, glucose can enter the muscles and cells with far less insulin. This leads to a drop in blood glucose levels during exercise and for a few hours after while the muscles recover. This causes an immediate though temporary decrease in blood glucose.

Over time, regular activity can make the body less insulin resistant during activity or rest. This can lead to more long term benefits and may lead to a decrease in the need for medication.

In addition to helping control diabetes, exercise can also improve your overall health by decreasing weight, the risk of cardiovascular disease, and blood vessel damage.

Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes, Healthy Eating

Exercise Recommendations
It is important that you talk to a doctor before starting an exercise program. You and your doctor can work together to choose an exercise program that is right for you.

For greatest benefits, you will need to do both aerobic exercises and strength training. Aerobic exercises include things like walking, bicycling, and swimming. Strength training exercises and classes use things like weight machines, free weights, and resistance bands. Adults should aim for:

  • At least 150 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise
  • 2-3 days of strength training per week
  • Try not to go more than 2 days without some type of activity

Look for opportunities during the day to add to your overall activity level. Take the stairs instead of the elevator, take a short walk during the day, or walk instead of taking the car. Even 10 minutes of activity can provide some immediate benefits.

Safety Steps
Certain diabetes medication can lead to a dip in blood glucose called hypoglycemia. Talk to your doctor to understand if this may be a problem for you. Be aware of signs of hypoglycemia during exercise such as dizziness, shaking, or confusion. If you have these symptoms, stop exercising and manage hypoglycemia. Let your doctor know about any episodes, since your medication may need to be adjusted.

Diabetes can also affect the nerves and blood flow to the feet. Inspect your feet frequently, since diabetes can sometimes lessen your ability to feel pain from a foot injury.

Keep in mind that exercise is only one piece of an overall diabetes management plan. You will also need to control your blood glucose levels with good nutrition.

by Cynthia M. Johnson, MA

RESOURCES:
American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:

Physical activity for type 2 diabetes. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T270048/Physical-activity-for-type-2-diabetes. Accessed February 20, 2017.

Physical activity is important. American Diabetes Association website. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/physical-activity-is-important.html. Updated December 27, 2016. Accessed February 20, 2017.

What we recommend. American Diabetes Association website. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/types-of-activity/what-we-recommend.html. Updated May 19, 2015. Accessed February 20, 2017.

How to Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes with Diet. Available at: https://www.jenreviews.com/diabetes/ Accessed November 2018

Last reviewed December 2017 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Michael Woods, MD, FAAP  Last Updated: 12/22/2017

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

opioid crisis physical therapy

CDC Launches Opioid Campaign in Hard-Hit States

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TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched a campaign to reduce overdose deaths from prescription opioid painkillers. Between 1999 and 2015, more than 183,000 people in the United States died from prescription opioid overdoses such as OxyContin (oxycodone) and Vicodin (hydrocodone). The goal of the CDC’s Rx Awareness campaign is to increase knowledge of the risks of prescription opioids and stop inappropriate use. Personal accounts from recovering opioid abusers and people who’ve lost loved ones will be featured. “It only takes a little to lose a lot” is the campaign tagline. It will be featured in videos, audio ads, social media ads, internet banners, web graphics, billboards and posters. Campaign ads are planned to run for the next 14 weeks in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Mexico and Ohio. The campaign will expand to other states as more funding becomes available. “This campaign is part of CDC’s continued support for states on the frontlines of the opioid overdose epidemic,” CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in an agency news release. “These heartbreaking stories of the devastation brought on by opioid abuse have the potential to open eyes and save lives,” she said. In 2015, 12.5 million people in the United States misused prescription opioids. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for prescription opioid misuse and more than 40 people die from prescription opioid overdoses. Prescription opioid abuse is also a major risk factor for heroin use. About three-quarters of new heroin users misused prescription opioids before using heroin.

Manage pain safely with Physical Therapy. Physical therapy is a safe non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries. Great candidates to be referred to physical therapy instead of prescribing pain pills include:

  • A patient that has had pain for more than 90 days
  • A patient that complains of pain disturbing their sleep or daily activities
  • A patient that has a history of substance abuse or has been on pain medication for an extended period of time
  • A patient that expresses an interest in avoiding opioids

Try Physical Therapy and experience the difference. For more information about what physical therapy can treat. Visit the PTandMe Injury Center.

For more information, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on prescription opioids.

HealthDay News

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

Fall Prevention Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy for Balance & Fall Prevention

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“Falls are the leading cause of injury death for Americans 65 years or older. Each year, about 35–40% of adults 65 and older fall at least once.”
— Center for Disease Control

Physical Therapy for Fall Prevention
Physical therapy fall prevention programs are tailored around each individual’s needs. The length of the program is dependent on the severity of the symptoms and the goals of each individual. Most patients will follow a gradual path of three distinct phases. After an initial evaluation to determine needs and goals of patient and we will set up treatment plan with patient input. The first phase typically includes therapeutic interventions designated to decrease symptoms and the establishment of a Home Exercise Program (HEP). We will then Continue the use of therapeutic interventions with the addition of ADL modifications, and energy conservation techniques. Finally we will continue the program until the patient’s goals are met.

The main objectives in a fall prevention program are to:

  • Increase independence with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)
  • Increase independence with functional mobility
  • Decrease fall risk
  • Prevent future fall
  • Increase safety

Pain Relief
Our PTandMe licensed physical therapists are skilled in helping patients significantly reduce the risk of falls so that seniors can continue to age independently. If you or someone you know may benefit from a fall prevention program – call a clinic near you today and see what options are available for you! To find a PTandMe partnering location in your area click here.

Protect Yourself from Tickborne Illnesses

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They may be small, but the bite from just one infected tick can cause symptoms that range from fever and chills to severe infections. However, you can protect yourself from tickborne illnesses, such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, by avoiding areas where ticks are present and preventing ticks from getting on your body.

AVOID TICK HABITATS
Ticks can be found in the northeastern, northwestern, mid-Atlantic, or upper north-central regions of the United States. They are most active in warmer months from April to September. However, they can be active when temperatures are above 40°F (4.4°C).
Tips for reducing your exposure to ticks include:

  • Avoid moist, shaded, wooded, or grassy areas.
  • Stay on cleared, well-traveled paths, and walk in the center of trails to avoid overgrown grass and brush.
  • Avoid sitting on the ground or on stone walls.
  • You can discourage ticks from your property if you:
  • Remove leaf litter, brush, and woodpiles from around your home and the edges of your yard.
  • Mow the grass often.
  • Discourage animals that carry ticks from coming onto your property.

PREVENT TICKS FROM GETTING ON YOUR BODY
Proper clothing can help protect you from tick bites when you enter areas that may have ticks. When spending time outdoors:

  • Wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. Light-colored clothing will make it easier for you to see any ticks that may get on you.
  • Tuck your shirt into your pants and tuck your pants into your socks.
  • Wear a hat. Braid or tie back long hair.
  • Wear closed toed shoes.

Insect repellant can also prevent tick bites. Repellents containing 20%-30% N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) can be applied to clothes and exposed skin. Repellents that have 0.5% permethrin can be applied to pants, socks, and shoes, but not to skin. Be sure to read product instructions carefully. For example:

  • Do not apply near your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Do not apply to children’s hands.
  • Reapply as directed.
  • Wash your skin when you return indoors.

PERFORM TICK CHECKS
After you spend time outdoors in a high-risk area:

  • Use a mirror to do a full-body tick check on yourself. You should also check any children who are in your care. Make sure to check for hidden areas, such as the hair, around the ears, under the arms, and in skin folds.
  • Examine your clothing for ticks that may attach to you after you come home.
  • Take a shower and wash your hair within 2 hours of coming indoors.
  • Put clothes worn outdoors in the dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill any unseen ticks.
  • If you have pets that spend time in high-risk areas, perform daily tick checks to prevent them from spreading to humans.

REMOVE TICKS FROM YOUR BODY

  • If you do find a tick, remove it by doing the following:
  • Use a pair of fine-pointed tweezers to grasp the tick by the head, as close to the skin as possible.
  • Pull directly outward. Use gentle but firm force. Do not twist the tick out. Try not to crush the tick’s body or handle it with bare fingers. This can spread the infection.
  • Wipe the site with an antiseptic to prevent infection.

KNOW THE SIGNS OF TICKBORNE ILLNESSES

Symptoms of a tickborne illness can occur weeks after exposure. Even if you have taken precautions, be sure to contact your doctor right away if you have recently spent time in a high-risk area and have fever and chills, aches and pains, and a distinctive rash.

by Cynthia M. Johnson, MA

RESOURCES:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

Healthy Children—American Academy of Pediatrics
https://www.healthychildren.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Canadian Paediatric Society
http://www.cps.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:

Preventing ticks on your pets. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/avoid/on_pets.html. Updated June 1, 2015. Accessed March 24, 2017.

Symptoms of tickborne illness. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/symptoms.html. Updated June 1, 2015. Accessed February 20, 2017.

Tick avoidance and removal. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T901539/Tick-avoidance-and-removal. Accessed February 20, 2017.

Michael Woods, MD June 2017

Last reviewed June 2017 by Michael Woods, MD

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

Increased Risk Zones

Work Related Stress & Increased Risk Zones: Part 1 of 2

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INCREASED RISK ZONES
All Risks Increase with Duration, Frequency and Magnitude.

• Excessive Force

• Repetition of Activity (Can irritate tendons and increase pressure on nerves)

• Awkward Posture (Can compress nerves and irritate tendons)

• Sustained Static Posture (Can restrict blood flow and damage muscles)

• Unsupported Positions

• Motion (Increased speed or acceleration when bending / twisting, can increase the amount of force exerted on the body)

• Compression (Grasping sharp edges like tool handles, can concentrate force on small areas of the body, reducing blood flow and nerve transmission, and damaging tendons and tendon sheaths)

• Inadequate Recovery Time (Overtime, lack of breaks, & failure to vary tasks)

• Vibration of Tools (From vibrating tools, can decrease blood flow, damage nerves, and contribute to muscle fatigue)

• Whole Body Vibration (From driving trucks or operating subways, can affect skeletal muscles and cause low-back pain)

• Effects of Temperature (Cold temperatures can adversely affect a worker’s coordination and manual dexterity while Heat stroke can be very serious as when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, it rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool down.)

• Environment (Slip/Fall hazard-Uneven Floor Surfaces)

• Material Handling Guidelines:
Weight Loading over 50lbs
Lift Speed greater than 5/minute
Vertical Lift Exceeds 3ft
Carry over 1 minute
Sustained Push/Pull over 30 seconds
Static reach holding tasks over 1 minute

Part two of our Work Related Stress & Increased Risk Zones can be found here

work related stress

Sources:
1) Ergonomics: The Study of Work, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA 3125, 2000 (Revised)
2) T. R. Waters, “Manual Materials Handling”, in: Physical and Biological Hazards of the Workplace 2nd. Edited by P. Wald and G. Stave. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002.
3) Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Disorders, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/ National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) © Fit2WRK 2015 R.Gagne

PT Month

Physical Therapy: Treating the Cause, Not Just the Symptoms of Pain

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PT_treating the Cause of Pain_FBsize

This PT Month, instead of using prescribed pain killers, try physical therapy first.

WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE PHYSICAL THERAPY OVER PRESCRIPTION PAIN KILLERS
Physical therapy treats the cause of pain, more often than not leaving patients stronger and more able to enjoy life and function fully. In stark contrast, pain relievers treat only the symptoms – and can leave patients dependent or addicted.

drugs

PHYSICAL THERAPY IS THE SMART ALTERNATIVE TO OPIOIDS
More than 40 people die every day from overdoses involving prescription opioids. At least half of opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid.

Wishing everyone a wonderful PT Month!

Information provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. To learn more about the CDC click here.