Tag Archives: work

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

ski

1. Skiing and Thumb Injury
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Skiing falls can often cause injury to the inner ligament of your thumb, caused by the force of the pole against this area of the hand during a fall. This area, a band of fibrous tissue connecting the bones at the bottom of the thumb, is known as the ulnar collateral ligament. Read more

crash

2. Amazing People Make A Difference: Megan and Earl’s Story
Written by the Therapy Team, ARC Physical Therapy+ – Topeka, Kansas

Earl Bayless was riding in his work truck on December 21, 2016 when his driver fell asleep, causing a major accident. Their truck flipped several times in the air and skidded a block down the road before coming to a stop and leaving Earl to wonder what just happened. Read more

rowing

3. 6 Benefits of Rowing
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

If you are looking for a low-impact workout that targets multiple areas of the body while getting your heart rate up, rowing might be the right exercise for you! Read more

Industrial Rehab Physical Therapy PTandMe

Health Aging for a Sustainable Workforce

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What Can Employers Do to Protect an Aging Workforce?

Employers can start by revisiting job descriptions and knowing every detail each work task entails in order to help prevent costly and unnecessary workers’ compensation claims. Meanwhile, they should continue to promote health and wellness programs for all employees. Because older workers bring many benefits, from their experience and knowledge to their motivation and good work ethic, the advantages of employing older workers will outweigh the possible worker’s compensation claims, with preparation and planning.

Companies must utilize and implement preventative safety efforts. Specifically, companies should develop slip-and-fall prevention tactics, considering that slips and falls account for 33 percent of all injuries sustained by workers 65 and older, according to the National Safety Council. Safety training should consist of more than just scripted lectures, distributed
pamphlets and orientation videos. Employees should be taken through the physical movements and tasks that are specific to their job description–a hands-on learning experience. Because younger workers account for the majority of accidents while older workers have longer recovery periods, safety training benefi ts all employees and the employer. Bring in external experts such as physical therapists from the community to teach proper techniques and protocols.

  • Modification of work environment
  • Ergonomics and wellness programs
  • Industrial Athlete approach to exercise
  • Return to work accommodations

AGING WORKFORCE SERVICES:

Education:
A full battery of educational programs are available for both the professional staff of an employer to that of the general employee population such as slip and fall or back injury prevention.

Preventative Maintenance Testing:

A brief test – approx. 15 minutes that looks at the essential and critical factors of the job – usually body part specific and set up as a repeated test – every three to four months on a high risk job position – looking for trends or patterns of degradation of range of motion or strength of employees.

Fitness Programs for the Industrial Athlete:
Detailed stretching programs are customized per high risk job based upon historical injury determinations. The program is set up for employee participation prior to work, returning from lunch and at the end of the workday.

Physical Ability Maintenance:
A custom built strengthening program designed to maintain the physical abilities necessary to perform everyday work.

For more information about staying healthy and injury free in the workplace – try the links below:


       

Adapted from Fit2wrk Article 1.10   For more information on Fit2wrk click here.

FCE

Functional Capacity / Work Capacity Evaluation

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FCE_WCE_Testing_FBsize

What is FCE / WCE Testing?
A Functional Capacity / Work Capacity Evaluation evaluates an individual’s ability to perform work activities post injury or illness. It documents the patient’s current ability from physical, medical, behavioral and ergonomic perspectives. It is within the scope of practice for occupational and physical therapists to provide such testing.

What to Expect
• FCE / WCE s can be used by physicians to complete work status reports. The FCE / WCE identifies the ability of an individual to safely return to work at full, modified or transitional duty
• The patient’s strength for material handling activities are identified via Department of Labor Standards: ex.) sedentary, light, medium or heavy
• An individual’s tolerance to non material activities such as sitting, walking, bending, etc. are quantified as never, occasional, frequent or constant as per Department of Labor standards
• A FCE / WCE will identify discrepancies between symptoms and objective findings
• FCE / WCEs can identify whether further medical evaluation or intervention is appropriate
• It can determine if there is a need for therapy or change in current therapy or direction
• If the individual is not ready for return to their previous job, it can establish a baseline for a work hardening program

Shoulder Stretch

This information provided by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group located throughout Bend, OR. Rebound’s Bend North location specializes in industrial rehabilitation and More information about their industrial rehab center can be found here.

Increased Risk Zones

Work Related Stress & Increased Risk Zones: Part 1 of 2

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INCREASED RISK ZONES
All Risks Increase with Duration, Frequency and Magnitude.

• Excessive Force

• Repetition of Activity (Can irritate tendons and increase pressure on nerves)

• Awkward Posture (Can compress nerves and irritate tendons)

• Sustained Static Posture (Can restrict blood flow and damage muscles)

• Unsupported Positions

• Motion (Increased speed or acceleration when bending / twisting, can increase the amount of force exerted on the body)

• Compression (Grasping sharp edges like tool handles, can concentrate force on small areas of the body, reducing blood flow and nerve transmission, and damaging tendons and tendon sheaths)

• Inadequate Recovery Time (Overtime, lack of breaks, & failure to vary tasks)

• Vibration of Tools (From vibrating tools, can decrease blood flow, damage nerves, and contribute to muscle fatigue)

• Whole Body Vibration (From driving trucks or operating subways, can affect skeletal muscles and cause low-back pain)

• Effects of Temperature (Cold temperatures can adversely affect a worker’s coordination and manual dexterity while Heat stroke can be very serious as when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, it rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool down.)

• Environment (Slip/Fall hazard-Uneven Floor Surfaces)

• Material Handling Guidelines:
Weight Loading over 50lbs
Lift Speed greater than 5/minute
Vertical Lift Exceeds 3ft
Carry over 1 minute
Sustained Push/Pull over 30 seconds
Static reach holding tasks over 1 minute

Part two of our Work Related Stress & Increased Risk Zones can be found here

work related stress

Sources:
1) Ergonomics: The Study of Work, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA 3125, 2000 (Revised)
2) T. R. Waters, “Manual Materials Handling”, in: Physical and Biological Hazards of the Workplace 2nd. Edited by P. Wald and G. Stave. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002.
3) Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Disorders, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/ National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) © Fit2WRK 2015 R.Gagne

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

flu

1. Survival Tips for Cold and Flu Season
Written by the Therapy Team at Integrated Rehabilitation Group – Seattle, WA

You’ve probably had many cold and flu viruses of varying severity. But you may still be surprised by just how badly a cold or flu virus makes you feel. Read more

car reverse

2. Going in Reverse: When Your Back Impedes Driving
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Middleburg, VA

When backing up your car, do you find it difficult to turn around to see what’s behind? Loss of rotational ability in the back is one of the problems we develop as we age. Read more

man stretching 2

3. 4 Ways To Improve Your Quality of Life Today
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

How often do you get home tired from a long day, frustrated with work, traffic, or co-workers? Our blood pressure has increased, stress levels have caused emotional, behavioral, and physical changes in us that otherwise would not be part of our normal calm day. Read more