Tag Archives: spine

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

ski

1. Skiing and Thumb Injury
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Skiing falls can often cause injury to the inner ligament of your thumb, caused by the force of the pole against this area of the hand during a fall. This area, a band of fibrous tissue connecting the bones at the bottom of the thumb, is known as the ulnar collateral ligament. Read more

crash

2. Amazing People Make A Difference: Megan and Earl’s Story
Written by the Therapy Team, ARC Physical Therapy+ – Topeka, Kansas

Earl Bayless was riding in his work truck on December 21, 2016 when his driver fell asleep, causing a major accident. Their truck flipped several times in the air and skidded a block down the road before coming to a stop and leaving Earl to wonder what just happened. Read more

rowing

3. 6 Benefits of Rowing
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

If you are looking for a low-impact workout that targets multiple areas of the body while getting your heart rate up, rowing might be the right exercise for you! Read more

reduce back pain

No Turning Back: Reduce Back Pain with These Spine-Stabilizing Exercises

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We take so many things about our bodies for granted. They feel good, we go about our daily activities and we never think about the complex mechanisms at place. That is until something goes wrong. Take your back: it serves as stabilizer, flexor, movement and relaxor too. But unfortunately, back pain troubles many of us — about 8 in 10 people in their lifetime will experience back pain. But you don’t have to rely on pills to relieve symptoms or even countless trips to a doctor. Exercises offer a proactive approach to reduce back pain, and this graphic can help with ideas.

reduce-back-pain-with-these-spine-stabilizing-exercises-web-1

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

old man tennis

1. Tennis and Golf: Keep Swinging as You Age
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Middleburg, VA

It’s a hard fact to swallow: Age eventually catches up with all of us, no matter how active we may be. Unless we work to maintain strength and flexibility, we slowly lose both as we age. Read more

track girl

2. Bridging the Gap
Written by Jess VandenBerg MS, AT, ATC, CSCS at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

If you have ever rehabilitated an athletic injury, you know there is a big difference between completing your rehab, and returning to competition. You are pain free, have full range of motion, and are completely functional, but are you prepared for the true demands of your sport, both mentally and physically? Read more

spine

3. Is There an Association Between Radiological Severity of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Disability, Pain, or Surgical Outcome?
Written by the Therapy Team at Oregon Spine and Physical Therapy – Eugene, OR

Last week I wrote a blog about a new research article about the shoulder and MRI. It helps us better understand the role of an MRI when trying to figure out the best plan to deal with a painful or injured body part. The old belief that an MRI is the “gold standard” is rapidly dying when it comes to understanding what to do with muscle and joint pain. Read more

aquatic therapy

Is Aquatic Therapy For You?

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Aquatic therapy offers an alternative environment for therapeutic exercise. If you have tried traditional physical therapy, or have restrictions on your physical therapy program, aquatic Therapy may be the perfect solution for your physical therapy needs.

Why Aquatic Therapy is Beneficial

Less pressure: The buoyancy of the water decreases the amount of pressure, or compressive forces, on your joints and spine. When you’re immersed in water up to your neck, the weight pressing down on your body is reduced by 90%. When the water is up to your waist, the pressure is reduced by 50%.

Reduced swelling: The pressure of the water helps to move fluid from the injured area back into the body. Decreased swelling is essential for regaining the strength and motion needed for recovery.

Ease of movement:
Water is an element that supports and assists movement. It offers a safe setting for regaining strength and joint range of motion.

Faster progress: Aerobic conditioning can often be performed in the water, even when it may be too soon or too difficult to do in the clinic. Staying stable in the water, challenges your core and balance. Plus, sports specific activity can begin earlier than on land.

old man swimming

Who Can Benefit From Aquatic Therapy

• Chronic pain patients requiring a more gentle form of therapy
• Patients at risk of falls due to balance and gait disorders
• Patients with severe arthritis or other weight-bearing restrictions
• Prenatal and postnatal patients
• Patients with general deconditioning
• Sports medicine and orthopedic patients requiring an accelerated component to their rehab protocol

This information was written by Life Fitness Physical Therapy, a privately-owned, outpatient physical therapy practice operating 14 clinics in the metro and surrounding Baltimore, Maryland area. Life Fitness Physical Therapy was founded in 2000 based on the core values of providing the highest level of customer service and clinical excellence in outpatient physical therapy. For more information click here.

golf stretches

Dynamic Golf Stretches

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Golf requires strength, flexibility, endurance and power to create pain free movement and improve your game. The most common golf injury is low back pain followed by shoulder pain and knee pain. A physical therapist can assist you in improving your pain and correct your body’s deficits.  These golf stretches will make your golf game less painful and reduce those extra strokes:

hamstring stretch

Hamstring Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

back extension stretch

Back Extension Stretch
(hold club backwards overhead, repeat 10x)

hip back shoulder rotation

Hip/Back/Shoulder Rotation Stretch
(hold club behind back and rotate torso to each side 10x)

calf stretch

Calf Stretch
(move from upright into stretched position 10x)

lumbar rotation 1

lumbar rotation 2

Lumbar Spine Rotation
(hold club, plant feet as shown, rotate to each side 10x)

forearm rotation 1

forearm rotation 2

forearm rotation 3

Forearm Rotation
(hold club straight up, then rotate to each side 10x)

This information was written by Mishock Physical Therapy and Associates, a privately-owned, outpatient physical therapy practice operating 6 clinics in 2 counties located in southeast Pennsylvania. They actively participate in the community by providing services to schools, retirement communities and local businesses. Their mission is to provide the most efficacious, state-of-the-art physical therapy services to relieve pain, restore function and return you to the highest quality of life possible. For more information click here.

Scoliosis: Early Detection = Better Outcomes

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ThinkstockPhotos-151018644
 
Scoliosis is a medical condition in which the spine is curved either front to back or side to side and is often rotated to one side or the other. It can occur at birth (congenitally), develop over time having no obvious cause, but often seen related to posture and growth (idiopathically) or due to an injury or the other condition (secondarily), such as cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy.
The most common type is adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. It usually develops between the ages of 10 and 15, during periods of rapid growth. There are two kinds of curves, single or “C” curves and double or “S” curves. “C” curves are slightly more common than “S” curves. The curve can occur in the upper back (thoracic), lower back (lumbar), or a combination of both.
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