Tag Archives: tennis elbow

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

old man tennis

1. Tennis and Golf: Keep Swinging as You Age
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Middleburg, VA

It’s a hard fact to swallow: Age eventually catches up with all of us, no matter how active we may be. Unless we work to maintain strength and flexibility, we slowly lose both as we age. Read more

track girl

2. Bridging the Gap
Written by Jess VandenBerg MS, AT, ATC, CSCS at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

If you have ever rehabilitated an athletic injury, you know there is a big difference between completing your rehab, and returning to competition. You are pain free, have full range of motion, and are completely functional, but are you prepared for the true demands of your sport, both mentally and physically? Read more

spine

3. Is There an Association Between Radiological Severity of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Disability, Pain, or Surgical Outcome?
Written by the Therapy Team at Oregon Spine and Physical Therapy – Eugene, OR

Last week I wrote a blog about a new research article about the shoulder and MRI. It helps us better understand the role of an MRI when trying to figure out the best plan to deal with a painful or injured body part. The old belief that an MRI is the “gold standard” is rapidly dying when it comes to understanding what to do with muscle and joint pain. Read more

Tennis Elbow, What causes it and how to treat it.

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What Causes Lateral Epicondylitis?

Commonly known as “tennis elbow”, lateral epicondylitis is an inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm extensor muscles to the outside of the elbow. More recently it is believed that tennis elbow is due to the degeneration of the wrist extensor tendons. Either way this affects the muscles that lift the wrist and hand. Pain may be felt where these fibers attach to the bone on the outside of the elbow or along the muscles in the forearm. Overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow are the most common reasons people develop tennis elbow. Repeating some types of activities over and over again can put too much strain on the elbow tendons. These activities are not necessarily high-level sports competition. Hammering nails, picking up heavy buckets, or pruning shrubs can all cause the pain of tennis elbow. Some patients, however, develop tennis elbow without any specific recognizable activity leading to symptoms.

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Helpful Hints to Stop Tennis Elbow

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Commonly known as “tennis elbow”, lateral epicondylitis is an inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm extensor muscles to the outside of the elbow. More recently it is believed that tennis elbow is due to the degeneration of the wrist extensor tendons. Either way this affects the muscles that lift the wrist and hand. Pain may be felt where these fibers attach to the bone on the outside of the elbow or along the muscles in the forearm. Overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow are the most common reasons people develop tennis elbow. Repeating some types of activities over and over again can put too much strain on the elbow tendons. These activities are not necessarily high-level sports competition. Hammering nails, picking up heavy buckets, or pruning shrubs can all cause the pain of tennis elbow. Some patients, however, develop tennis elbow without any specific recognizable activity leading to symptoms.

Continue reading