Tag Archives: Grand Rapids

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

back

1. My Back Pain Always Returns! What Can I Do?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

After the common cold, the most common reason Americans miss work is back pain. Unfortunately, once you have experienced back strain or injury, it can easily become a recurring problem. Read more

uncommon

2. Uncommon Injury and Treatment Process
Written by Steve Retan AT, ATC, the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Having worked as an athletic trainer for the last 23 years, I have treated and rehabilitated countless injuries.  However there are times that athletes sustain injuries that I have not seen before.  One such injury occurred to a high school hockey player after colliding with an opponent during a game. Read more

ankle

3. Tips for Improving Your Ankle Mobility
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

It’s important for a physically active body to achieve a stable balance between each active joint for maximum performance. In order for all of this to happen, ankle mobility is essential and is the root for several exercises or workouts! Read more

Sports Drinks

Hydration & Supplements: Sports Drinks vs. Energy Drinks

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hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

It’s important to stay hydrated during physical activity. While water is still the best choice for hydration, other acceptable options are available. Do you know what is most effective for your workout?

Sports Drinks
Sports drinks are ideal for athletes looking to hydrate and replenish after long, intensive exercise (usually greater than 60 minutes). Sports drinks contain a combination of electrolytes, carbs, minerals, and vitamins. This combination of nutrients serve to restore lost fluid and sodium levels. Additionally, the sugary carbs found in sport drinks provide athletes a boost of natural energy to aid in recovery.

hydration, energy drinks, sports drinks, chocolate milk, muscle, cramps, electrolytes, nutrients, supplements, nutrition, water, hydrated

Energy Drinks
Energy drinks are never a good option for athletes. While these beverages do provide an apparent energy boost, the effects are temporary. Energy drinks contain few helpful macronutrients, like carbs, and instead use the stimulant caffeine to create an artificial boost of energy. These high concentrations of caffeine can act as a diuretic thus increasing dehydration risks. Too much caffeine can also cause jitters, dizziness and headaches leading to decreased performance. High doses of caffeine have been linked to cardiac emergencies.

Chocolate Milk?
Effectively recover with chocolate milk. Low-fat chocolate milk makes a simple yet effective post-workout snack. Offering just the right mix of carbs and protein, this tasty drink refuels your body and helps muscles through recovery. Drink up!

Out Smart Muscle Cramps:
Painful muscle cramps can quickly sideline an athlete. While the root cause is still being researched, dehydration, muscle imbalances and improper warm-up are likely factors. Follow these basics to help prevent muscle cramps:

  • Stay hydrated, make sure your athlete does not start the practice/game dehydrated.
  • Pack a refillable water bottle to drink throughout the day.
  • Consume a balanced diet with healthy amounts of sodium.
  • Bolster weak muscle groups with functional, plyometric and strength training.
  • Practice foam rolling and static stretching in tight areas.
  • Incorporate a dynamic warmup.

Written by the Therapy Team at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, Michigan.
To learn more about the Center for Physical Rehabilitation click here.

labral tear physical therapy

ATC Tip: The Labrum

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Anatomy of the Shoulder
The shoulder can move in almost every plane of motion, it’s the most mobile joint in the human body; but more mobility = more instability. The shoulder joint is often described as a “ball in socket,” but it’s wide range of motion makes it a highly vulnerable joint. We have a network of soft tissue structures, such as the rotator cuff and ligaments, whose main job is to keep the humeral head in its assigned seat. However, often these muscles alone are not sufficient as they can become weak or tight and thus less efficient. The labrum is a small ring of cartilage that provides additional stability to the shoulder joint.

How Does a Labrum Become Damaged?
Direct trauma, shearing forces, or repetitive stress can cause damage to the labrum. Often, this damage will present as a tear in the labrum, which can restrict motion, decrease strength, and cause pain in the shoulder. Picturing that ring of cartilage, imagine a roughening of the edges of the bowl-like golf tee, or even a rip that flaps when the ball is spun around. It is not uncommon for a shoulder dislocation or subluxation to be accompanied by a labral tear; chronic shoulder instability can also lead to labrum injury.

What Does a Labrum Do?
Because the “ball and socket” is so shallow, the shoulder joint is often described, quite accurately, like a “golf ball sitting on a tee.” To picture the shoulder labrum, imagine a ring around the outer edge of a golf tee, effectively deepening the overall bowl shape, almost suctioning the humerus into the space. The labrum helps stabilize the shoulder by making the “ball” more difficult to remove from the “tee.”

How Can I Prevent a Labrum Injury?
The best way to prevent a labral tear is to strengthen the musculature surrounding the shoulder joint. The best case scenario is all of the muscles are working together to keep the shoulder joint moving fluidly through its full range of motion. Important within this group of muscles are the muscle that control the shoulder blades. By strengthening the stabilizing muscles individually and functionally, it helps them stay balanced and strong with the other, stronger muscles (like the RTC). The other way to prevent a labrum tear is to avoid excessive contact, repetitive overhead motions, and falls.

This article about athletic injuries was provided by PT & Me physical therapy partner: The Center for Physical Rehabilitation. More information about the center and their locations throughout Grand Rapids, MI can be found on their website at www.pt-cpr.com

To see a shoulder strengthening program visit our Sports Medicine Tip Page by clicking here.

PT&Me Thanks Our Wonderful Patients

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This Thanksgiving holiday PT&Me is thankful for our patients. Without their support for our physical therapy clinics we wouldn’t have the continued success that we are so thankful for. Here are some of the ways our patients have thanked us for their recovery and well being through their awesome online reviews:

Advance Rehabilitation – Brunswick, GA (click for location details)
“Love the great, friendly, knowledgeable and caring staff! Highly recommend for your needs!”
– Norma Worley (click for review)

Pinnacle Therapy Services – Overland Park, KS (click for location details)
“I’ve had PT at two of the area hospitals and another private facility, and although I had results from all of them, I feel that Pinnacle goes above and beyond in customer service, attitude and demeanor of all therapists, and most importantly, skills and knowledge of said practitioners. Most recently, I worked with Amy and received superior care. The results I received have been the most long-lasting and beneficial.”
– Shawna Deck (click for review)

Port City Physical Therapy – Portland, ME (click for location details)
“The therapists at Port City Therapy are wonderful! They made my time in therapy both fun and informative. I learned what to do to stay healthy for the future. I actually looked forward to each visit.”
– Carole J. (click for review)

The Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI
(click for location details)
“Very caring and competent. Great to work with. I have used them multiple times. Always pleased.”
– Larry Pieniazek (click for review)

Plymouth Physical Therapy Specialists – Jackson, MI (click for location details)
“This is a great facility with a friendly and professional staff. Everyone seems to go above and beyond to address patient needs in a highly personalized manner. That means so much when you are trying to get back in tip top shape. I will definitely recommend to any of my family or friends requiring physical therapy. Thank you guys for your help!”
– Emily A. (click for review)

From all of us at PT & Me we would like to wish you and your family a very happy Thanksgiving!

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Age Appropriate Strength & Performance Training
Written by Joe Chiaramonte AT, ATC, CSCS at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation and Therapy – Grand Rapids, MI

In recent years there has been much discussion on training for our adolescent athletes and what is appropriate, whether it be how much, how soon, how specialized? Read more

2. Breast Cancer Rehabilitation
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics- Northern Virginia

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. Physical Therapy is an integral part of breast cancer rehabilitation. Read more

3. Show Hope Video Shares Impact of STAR Physical Therapy
Written by the Therapy Team at STAR Physical Therapy – Tennessee

STAR Physical Therapy’s mission, To Serve, knows no boundaries. Read more

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Does Wearing a New Knee Brace Help?
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy – Northern Virginia

As the largest joint in the body and because of its exposed position, the knee is especially vulnerable to injury during sports activities. Read more

2. Is Apple Cider Vinegar the Remedy You Need?
Written by the Erin Clason, PT at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation and Therapy – Grand Rapids, MI

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has been used for centuries as a folk remedy to treat everything from warts and the common cold to acid reflux and arthritis. Read more

3. Therapeutic Ultrasound
Written by Angeline Peterson, PT at Intermountain Physical Therapy and Hand Rehabilitation – Meridian, ID

“Are you checking for a foot baby?” That question is not one you may hear very often and may spark further conversation. Read more

whiplash

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

serious car accident

1. Seeing a Physical Therapist After an Accident
Written by Cody Kenison, PT, DPT, CSCS at Parkside Physical Therapy – Spokane, WA

Anyone who has been involved in an accident and is now struggling to cope with a resulting injury should seriously consider visiting a physical therapist. Read more

thinking healthy

2. What You Eat Affects Inflammation and Healing
Written by Meghan Russo, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Did you know that many foods can decrease or increase inflammation and help to decrease pain? Read more

running couple

3. Tips for Beginner Runners
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

If you think running is not for you – think again. Read more

overtraining

Are You Overtraining?

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Are You Overtraining_FBsize

Maintaining a rigorous workout schedule without allowing enough time for the body to recover, often leads to what is known as overtraining. Not only is an athlete at a higher risk for injury but overtraining can manifest itself in several other ways.

WHAT CAN CAUSE OVERTRAINING
• Sudden increase in exercise frequency
• Intensity or duration of training sessions
• Not allowing your body adequate recovery
• The length of time you have been training

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF OVERTRAINING
• Persistent muscle soreness
• Elevated resting heart rate.
• Increased susceptibility to infections.
• Increased incidence of injuries.
• Irritability
• Depression
• Loss of motivation
• Insomnia
• Stop noticing progress towards training goals
• Becoming restless and losing focus
• Feeling sluggish all day

HOW TO AVOID OVERTRAINING
• Get enough sleep – this is the time when your body is able to heal the most
• Proper nutrition- get plenty of protein, fats and carbs
• Monitor stress levels

leg press

Exercise Smartly:
• Find a balance and avoid workouts that are too intense for you
• Progress workouts slowly

Allow Proper Recovery Time Between Workout Sessions:
Take one or two days between workout sessions or alternate intensity levels for each workout

Stay Active On Off Days:
• Try a less intense mode of exercise (Active Rest)
• Yoga, stretching, or foam rolling can be done on these days

Information provided by the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI
To learn more about the Center for Physical Rehabilitation click here.

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Exercise after Knee Replacement Surgery
Written by the Therapy Team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy – Gahanna, OH

If you’ve been undergoing treatment for knee arthritis and haven’t gotten any pain relief yet, your doctor may recommend a total knee replacement surgery. Read more

2. Low Back Pain and Sciatica Workshop
Written by the Therapy Team at Oregon Spine & Physical Therapy – Eugene, OR

If you are suffering with chronic back pain or sciatica and you’re looking for some help… why don’t you start by attending one of our Educational Workshops so you can make a better, more educated and more informed decision about your options to ease it. Read more

3. Inflammation and Your Diet
Written by Cheryl Schwieters, Physical Therapist Assistant at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Throughout the day the body is constantly being bombarded with substances that can trigger inflammation. Read more

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Four Common Signs of Concussions
Written by the Dustin Blevins, DPT, CSCS at Sports Physical Therapy & Performance Centers – Kirkland, WA

With football season coming to a close you might think the risk of an impact injury like a concussion would be on the decline for winter sports. Read more

2. Early Intervention is the Key to Success
Written by Ben Eggleston, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

The relationship between longevity of symptoms and healing time is of reciprocal proportion? Read more

3. Overtraining Doesn’t Help, It Hurts 
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

Working to achieve a sports or fitness goal can drive many people to overtrain in an effort to get stronger, better, faster. Read more