Tag Archives: inflammation

whiplash

PT News

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

thinking healthy

2. What You Eat Affects Inflammation and Healing
Written by Meghan Russo, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Did you know that many foods can decrease or increase inflammation and help to decrease pain? Read more

running couple

3. Tips for Beginner Runners
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

If you think running is not for you – think again. Read more

PT News

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Exercise after Knee Replacement Surgery
Written by the Therapy Team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy – Gahanna, OH

If you’ve been undergoing treatment for knee arthritis and haven’t gotten any pain relief yet, your doctor may recommend a total knee replacement surgery. Read more

2. Low Back Pain and Sciatica Workshop
Written by the Therapy Team at Oregon Spine & Physical Therapy – Eugene, OR

If you are suffering with chronic back pain or sciatica and you’re looking for some help… why don’t you start by attending one of our Educational Workshops so you can make a better, more educated and more informed decision about your options to ease it. Read more

3. Inflammation and Your Diet
Written by Cheryl Schwieters, Physical Therapist Assistant at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Grand Rapids, MI

Throughout the day the body is constantly being bombarded with substances that can trigger inflammation. Read more

Plantar Fasciitis

Hamstring Tightness and Plantar Fasciitis

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Hamstring Tightness_FBsize

Plantar fasciitis is classically characterized by pain in the central to medial plantar heel. It is thought to be caused by chronic inflammation of the plantar fascia due to repetitive strain and trauma to the fascia. There are many other purported causes including, calcaneal spurs and increased intraosseous calcaneal pressure, among others. Many studies have shown inflammatory and histological changes at the origin of plantar fascia and surrounding structures that are consistent with repetitive strain and degenerative changes including a thickening of the fascia.

Biomechanics has long been looked at when investigating possible causes to injuries. Alteration of the load bearing characteristics of the foot has been suggested by several studies to be the underlying problem in plantar fasciitis. Microtears and chronic degenerative changes result from the increased tensile stress places on the fascia due to the changes in biomechanics. Muscles tightness is one factor that can lead to changes in gait mechanics and load bearing of the foot. Hamstring tightness has recently been investigated as a factor in plantar fasciitis and has been shown to induce prolonged forefoot loading due to increased knee flexion during gait. A rapid progression through the contact phase of gait results from increased knee flexion and in turn increases forefoot pressure. The fascia is a fixed length ligament, so an increase in forefoot pressure results in increased tension at it’s insertion on the calcaneous. The increased time spent on the forefoot in gait leads to a chronic traction injury that is localized to the hindfoot insertion of the fascia; which is consistent with the symptoms of heel pain.

plantar

Biomechanical deficits have long been contributed to injuries. Only recently has hamstring tightness been shown to have an effect on plantar fasciitis. Hamstring tightness effects every step, resulting in a biomechanical deficit which may contribute to tensile overload of the plantar fasciitis. The recent studies suggest that all patients with plantar fasciitis should be evaluated for hamstring tightness. Physical therapy treatment for plantar fasciitis should include hamstring stretching.

More information about Plantar Fasciitis can be found in the PTandMe injury center.

physical therapy near me

This information was written by Plymouth Physical Therapy Specialists. They are committed to using evidence-based treatments in their practice. This means that their therapists utilize the most current and clinically relevant treatments in their approach to rehabilitation. For more information click here.

kids with arthritis

Can Physical Therapy Help Kids with Arthritis?

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

Kids_Arthritis_FBsize

Did you know that physical therapy can help kids with arthritis? Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA), also called Stills disease, is the most common form of arthritis seen in children and young adults.Children commonly complain of joint pain and stiffness, along with an occasional fever.

JRA can impact fine movements and overall mobility if left untreated. While medical therapy is the mainstay of treatment, physical therapy and rehabilitation are essential to restoring full movement and quality of life.

superhero_girl

How does physical therapy help?
Physical therapists are trained experts at delivering a variety of treatments to help reduce pain and improve joint movement. A child experiencing pain and dysfunction can feel isolated and left out, unable to participate in group activities with other children. A physical therapist can help the child to improve muscle tone, strength and reduce joint inflammation. This helps children regain the quality of life they deserve; allowing them to live with less pain and enjoy the benefits of unrestricted movement.

This information was written by Oregon Spine and Physical Therapy, a physical therapy group located in Eugene, Oregon. At Oregon Spine & Physical Therapy, your care begins with a comprehensive evaluation of your condition by your physical therapist. This initial assessment will allow the physical therapist to accurately reach a diagnosis and then prepare your appropriate, personal treatment plan. For more information click here.