Category Archives: General Information

Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

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Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

Whether it be from radiating pain down your leg from a herniated disc, or a frozen shoulder insidiously appearing, physical therapists provide non-invasive treatments that can give patients their life back when pain and dysfunction dominate their day-to-day happenings. Physical therapists manage a wide variety of ailments,
often quickly transitioning between rehabilitation for a reconstructed knee or shoulder, to eliminated debilitating cervicogenic headaches, to helping your newborn infant right their head when torticollis develops. When it comes to choosing the right physical therapist, most people have no idea what qualifies them to manage such a wide variety of diagnoses so efficiently and effectively.

Physical therapists are often considered to be an insurance-reimbursed personal trainer. So many times, patients enter my clinic asking for a “few stretches” so they can get back on their way. Therapy, however, encompasses more than providing patients with a workout. A physical therapist’s knowledge and education provides them with the foundation to not only treat your immediate diagnosis but to identify secondary diagnoses that may have been missed in your initial physician’s examination and to manage all of the concurrent problems that develop during your recovery. To do this, extensive knowledge and understanding of anatomy and all of the body systems is necessary.

Collegiate Physical Therapy Degrees

Physical therapists now need to attend school for a minimum of 7 years. This includes 4 years of prep work for the highly competitive application to graduate school, which tacks on the addition 3 years, at minimum. While in graduate school, a physical therapy student gains extensive knowledge of every system within the body. In addition to the obvious musculoskeletal system, the cardiovascular, neurological, and pulmonary systems are studied at length. This gives physical therapists the foundation for caring for a wide variety of patients including those with cystic fibrosis, acute heart attacks, spinal cord injuries, and ACL reconstructions. Clinical rotations are also fundamental to a physical therapist’s education. 20 percent of the physical therapist’s education is spent on full-time clinical rotations through most fields of practice. At the completion of graduate school, a physical therapist is awarded their degree, qualifying them to sit for the national physical therapy board examination. Some of the most common degrees that physical therapists have earned are:

PT (Physical Therapist)

A bachelor’s degree in physical therapy. This was the degree offered for years before physical therapists could become be licensed.  Colleges and universities then transitioned the program into a master’s degree, which ultimately turned into a  3-year post-baccalaureate degree.

MPT (Masters of Physical Therapy)

A 2-year post-baccalaureate degree that provides graduates with the entry-level education necessary to be eligible for the board examination. This degree is no longer offered, in favor of all exiting students now receiving the DPT degree.

DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy)

A 3-year post-baccalaureate degree that provides graduates with the entry-level education necessary to be eligible for the board examination. The added year in school is meant to provide students with more time in clinical rotations, exposure to business and management practices, and further education in research methods. This degree is now the standard for entry-level education and prepares students for direct access to physical therapy.

Additional Certifications

Much like physicians and nurses, school and learning do not stop when the graduation hat is tossed in the air; school is only the beginning of a life-long education process. Continuing education is the cornerstone of a therapist’s career. New research is always being published and medical techniques are always evolving within the broad field of medicine. Staying knowledgeable of these changes is necessary for a therapist to continue to provide their patients with superior care. Continuing education not only provides physical therapists to further their education on the latest and greatest but allows them to develop specializations in specific areas within the field. While every therapist takes a board exam at the end of school to become board-certified, therapists can also receive additional board-certifications when mastery of a subfield
is obtained. A few of the common additional certifications in the outpatient physical therapy field are listed below.

OCS (Orthopedic Certified Specialist)

A board-certified specialization in orthopedics that is earned beyond the entry-level degree which recognizes advanced clinical knowledge, skills, and abilities
in the orthopedics field. Candidates need to log a minimum of 2,000 direct patient care hours in their specialization field of practice and pass a
board examination to earn the distinction.

CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist)

Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists apply scientific knowledge to improve an athlete’s individual training and performance. They may also make recommendations regarding nutrition and injury prevention. This certification is offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Cert. MDT (Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy)

This certifies a physical therapist in providing mechanical diagnosis and therapy of the spine, a method that has been proven to be both effective and efficient in the treatment of spinal pathologies. This certification is offered through the McKenzie Institute and requires candidates to participate in a four-part certification course, as well as pass a written and clinical examination upon completion of the course.

In an every expanding medical field with alternative treatments growing by the day, it is important to know your professional’s qualifications for their treatments and the knowledge they bring to each individual case. Mastery in a field often requires years of education and years of experience. While your therapist may provide a relaxed environment filled with what seems like simple exercise and manual techniques, he or she brings to your individual situation skills that have taken years to develop.

If you need help choosing the right physical therapist, find a physical therapy clinic near you and ask them about their specialties.  Many physical therapists are proud of their skill sets and will be happy to go over any questions you may have!

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5 reasons why you need PT

Top 5 Reasons Why you Need Physical Therapy

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5 reasons why you need PT

Did you know that physical therapists can do so much more than help you recover from an injury?  Research shows that the faster you initiate care, the lower the cost and the faster you can return to the game of life. Get the care you deserve when you need it. We’ve listed our top five reasons why you need physical therapy – so check it out!

1. YOU ARE IN PAIN

If you are experiencing pain, physical therapy can help you treat the cause and not just the symptoms of your pain. Physical therapists work one-on-one with patients to achieve long term solutions without the use of expensive prescriptions or tests, saving them both time and money.

2. PREVENT SURGERY

Physical therapy works to reduce pain and heal injuries. It works so well in fact that in many cases it has been proven to remove or reduce the need for surgery. In the event that surgery is needed a pre-op visit can help make recovery easier and safer.

3. FALLEN MORE THAN ONCE IN THE PAST YEAR

According to the CDC, falls are the leading cause of injury and death for Americans over 65. Fall prevention programs offered by physical therapists are designed to increase independence with functional activities, functional mobility, and safety awareness while decreasing fall risk.

4. PREVENT SPORTS INJURIES

Physical therapists work with athletes on many levels to prevent injury while promoting improved performance. By evaluating body movements and muscle strength – physical therapists can tailor programs not only to the sport but to the individual athlete. Injury recovery programs are also available.

5. REACH OVERALL HEALTH GOALS

Physical therapy can help those that have had trouble with mobility or are looking to improve strength and overall health. Physical therapists are able to tailor programs to each patient’s ability levels in order to improve confidence and independence while reducing the risk of future injury.

Physical therapists are trained to help patients in a variety of different ways. If you believe that you need physical therapy you can easily find a PT near you and get started today!

physical therapy near me

 

recovery after an injury

The 4 Stages of Recovery After an Injury

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recovery after an injury

Soft tissue injuries are commonly categorized depending on a time frame beginning with the date the injury occurred. Physical therapy programs can help make recovery after an injury easier on the body.  Physical therapists are experts in the diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue injuries. They can also determine your phase of healing and the best techniques to continue the path to recovery.

Stage 1: Acute Stage | Protection Phase

A soft tissue injury is termed as acute from the initial time of injury and while the pain, bleeding, and swelling is at its worst. Your body’s aim at this point is to protect your injury from further damage. The usual time frame for your acute symptoms to settle is two to four days post-injury, but this can vary depending on how you treat your injury.

Treatment consists of modalities such as:

to help control inflammation and pain. Gentle movement can be added to maintain mobility.

Stage 2: Sub-Acute Stage | Repair Phase

A soft tissue injury is termed as sub-acute when the initial acute phase makes a transition to repairing the injured tissues. This phase commonly lasts up to six weeks post-injury when your body is busy laying down new soft tissue and reducing the need to protect your injury as the new scar tissue begins to mature and strengthen.

  • Modalities are still used as needed for inflammation.
  • Strengthening exercises are added as tolerated to stabilize around the injured area and begin to increase function.

Stage 3: Late Stage | Remodelling Phase

Your body does not magically just stop tissue healing at six-week post-injury. Healing is a continuum. At six weeks post-soft tissue injury your healing tissue is reasonably mature but as you stretch, strengthen and stress your new scar tissue it often finds that it is not strong enough to cope with your increasing physical demand.

When your body detects that a repaired structure is still weaker than necessary, it will automatically stimulate additional new tissue to help strengthen and support the healing tissue until it meets the demands of your normal exercise or physical function.

The period between six weeks and three months post-injury is commonly referred to as the remodelling phase.

  • Treatment will focus on progression back to pre-injury level and modality use is minimized.
  • Strengthening exercises are more dynamic and in several planes of motion.

Stage 4: Final Stage | Ongoing Repair and Remodelling

The final stage of tissue repair can last from 3 months up to 12 months. Scar tissue needs time to properly align and gain tensile strength needed for the forces placed on it. This phase focuses on improving the quality of the new tissue and preventing re-injury.

  • Treatment will be sport and activity specific to prepare for demands placed on the injured site.
  • Education on preventing re-injury is key!

Every injury faces its own challenges and breakthroughs. For more detailed information about a specific soft tissue injury reach out to your physical therapist. They can bring you successfully through each stage of recovery after an injury.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News August 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout August 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Physical Therapy Direct Access

1. Physical Therapy Direct Access is Coming to Texas
Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Starting September 1, 2019, it will be easier to get Physical Therapy in Texas, thanks to local San Antonio State Representative, Ina Minjarez (D) who drafted HB29, a handful of other State Reps who co-sponsored the bill, the Texas Medical Association, and the Texas Orthopedic Association.  Read more

 

House workout

2. Get Your Housework(Out) Done!

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR and the surrounding communities. 

Let’s get honest for a second though and realize not all moments are adventure packed (at least for your average community member). Here are some fantastic ways to make even the down time productive and moving you in a healthy direction… and you get the chores done! Read more

 

AEW Ability Rehab

3. Ability Rehabilitation Played Key Role at AEW’s Two Florida Based Events

Written by Ability Rehabilitation an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Tampa and Orlando.

Florida-based Ability Health Services & Rehabilitation worked closely with All Elite Wrestling (AEW) to provide athletic training and physical therapy care to the wrestlers at the recent FYTER FEST and FIGHT FOR THE FALLEN events, which both took place last month in Daytona Beach and Jacksonville, respectively. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News May 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout May 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

nutrition strategies

1. Effective Nutrition Strategies
Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with 8 physical therapy locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, MI.

How do you stay on target with eating healthy and being active? Between work schedules, kids schedules, appointments, and change of plans, finding time to exercise and eat right can sometimes feel impossible. Read more

 

physical therapy for headaches

2. Physical Therapy Can Help Headaches
Written by Mishock Physical Therapy and Associates, a privately owned, outpatient physical therapy practice throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester Counties.

Headache pain is the third most common pain complaint worldwide. Some people suffer from the occasional headache, but others suffer from daily, chronic headaches which can be disabling, interfere with one’s ability to work and result in decreased quality of life. Read more

 

Does Mono Mean no exercise

3. Does Mono Mean No Exercise?
Written by The Jackson Clinics with 21 physical therapy locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Mononucleosis—often known simply as “mono”—has an incubation period of one to two months. Once symptoms appear, recovery can take an additional four to six weeks. Until your physician tells you it is safe to resume more strenuous workouts, avoid any but the mildest exercise. Read more

sun safety

Sun Safety

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sun safety

The official start to summer is fast approaching and for many of us, the end of the school year marks the start of outdoor activities and beach vacations. While enjoying yourself this summer be sure to take precautions. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these sun safety recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

  • Shade
    You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelters before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.
  • Clothing
    When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor. If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.
  • Hat
    For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection. If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen with at least SPF 30, or by staying in the shade.
  • Sunglasses
    Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure. Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.
  • Sunscreen
    Put on a broad-spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

How sunscreen works. Most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 30.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 30, don’t use them by themselves.

Information supplied by the CDC

prevent joint pain physical therapy

6 Ways to Find Relief and Prevent Joint Pain

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prevent joint pain physical therapy

Joint pain is a common issue that can have many causes and can lead to an array of complications. Joint pain affects such a large percentage of the population. It is estimated that by the year 2030, 67 million—one in every four American adults—will have doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That doesn’t mean that we have to live in pain. It’s important to understand your pain and to take the steps needed to make sure it doesn’t lower your standard of living.

So, what are some great ways to relieve and prevent joint pain?

Going to Physical therapy

Physical therapy is a good solution for treating various joint pain symptoms. Physical therapists can help prevent or delay joint replacements, manage symptoms of arthritis/ chronic joint pain while providing tools to minimize pain or further damage to the joint, and help acutely injured joints recovery from injury. Improving flexibility and range of motion in the affected joints is also a key component in most physical therapy programs.

Getting enough movement and exercise

Even though the natural inclination for a person experiencing joint pain would be to move as little as possible, movement and light exercise will often time do the exact opposite, and be a great ally on your journey towards pain relief.

Good exercises for those who suffer from inflammation causing joint pain are aerobics, water aerobics, bicycling, burst training exercises, social activities that include movement, Tai Chi, light weight lifting, and yoga.

Go for a massage

Massaging the affected joint can be a treat, especially for joint pain occurring in the hips and knees. You can have this done at a treatment center, or have a professional who provides this type of service come to your home, but this is also something that a loved one can do for you, or that you can do yourself. An infographic from spa-hotels.ie has shown the benefits associated with massage therapy, including reducing joint pain and stress levels.

Maintain an ideal weight

Having a high BMI can cause joint pain. The more weight on the joint, the more effort is needed to move and support the body. Introducing movement and light exercise to a daily routine, as well as working towards a healthier diet, can reduce the strain on the joints. Before beginning an exercise regimen, it is important to consult your healthcare provider. A physical therapist or physician can introduce an exercise program that is tailored to your needs and ability level.

Eat an anti-inflammatory diet

Making the change to an anti-inflammatory diet is a great way to naturally alleviate joint pain. The Mediterranean diet is a good example of what anti-inflammatory eating habits should look like. One thing to be aware of is the fact that some of the most inflammatory foods out there are dairy and gluten products.

In order to mitigate joint pain through diet would be to eat a healthy amount fruits and vegetables, berries and nuts, various types of spices and herbs, as well as teas, such as green tea or ginger tea. Processed meats, fast food, artificial sweeteners, refined sugars, and chips should be cut as much as possible. Working with a nutritionist can help introduce long-term meaningful changes to a diet plan.

Get enough sleep

Believe it or not, the quality and quantity of sleep is a factor in pain relief. New research suggests that irregular sleep contributes to pain in a variety of ways, including the ability to tolerate pain. By adjusting your posture at night to keep pressure off of the painful joints, the body is able to more easily relax and allow for sleep. Exercising and remaining active throughout the day should also help you get better sleep at night.

As joint pain has become common, we tend to accept it as something we can’t really control. However, when looking at the most common causes for joint pain, we can clearly see that a sedentary lifestyle, high anxiety levels produced by stress, and unhealthy food choices are leading causes related to the issue in question.

In order to prevent inflammation, as much as in the purpose of relieving joint pain, we have to make better decisions regarding our way of living. This means creating an environment for ourselves and for our families where movement is valued and practiced on a daily basis. It also means that we should make an effort in order to ensure that there’s always a bit of time during the day to help clear one’s head by engaging in mindful practice, or by taking up a relaxing leisure activity. Equally important, it is essential to set dietary boundaries and to respect our body by not constantly abusing it with food that’s poor in nutrients, and lacks all of the advantages healthy food brings to the table when talking about the general health of the human body.

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opioid crisis physical therapy

CDC Launches Opioid Campaign in Hard-Hit States

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The U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched a campaign to reduce overdose deaths from prescription opioid painkillers. Between 1999 and 2015, more than 183,000 people in the United States died from prescription opioid overdoses such as OxyContin (oxycodone) and Vicodin (hydrocodone). The goal of the CDC’s Rx Awareness campaign is to increase knowledge of the risks of prescription opioids and stop inappropriate use. Personal accounts from recovering opioid abusers and people who’ve lost loved ones will be featured. “It only takes a little to lose a lot” is the campaign tagline. It will be featured in videos, audio ads, social media ads, internet banners, web graphics, billboards and posters. Campaign ads are planned to run for the next 14 weeks in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Mexico and Ohio. The campaign will expand to other states as more funding becomes available. “This campaign is part of CDC’s continued support for states on the frontlines of the opioid overdose epidemic,” CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in an agency news release. “These heartbreaking stories of the devastation brought on by opioid abuse have the potential to open eyes and save lives,” she said. In 2015, 12.5 million people in the United States misused prescription opioids. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for prescription opioid misuse and more than 40 people die from prescription opioid overdoses. Prescription opioid abuse is also a major risk factor for heroin use. About three-quarters of new heroin users misused prescription opioids before using heroin.

Manage pain safely with physical therapy. Physical therapy is a safe non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries. Great candidates to be referred to physical therapy instead of prescribing pain pills include:

  • A patient that has had pain for more than 90 days
  • A patient that complains of pain disturbing their sleep or daily activities
  • A patient that has a history of substance abuse or has been on pain medication for an extended period of time
  • A patient that expresses an interest in avoiding opioids

Try Physical Therapy and experience the difference. For more information about what physical therapy can treat. Visit the PTandMe Injury Center.

For more information, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on prescription opioids.

HealthDay News

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

PT News PTandMe

PT News February 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout February 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

 

2. Can I Exercise Safely with a Cold?
Written by the Therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics with physical therapy locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The average adult gets one to six colds every year, with symptoms lasting a week to 10 days. Should you let these colds interrupt your exercise routine? Probably not, as long as you pay attention to what your body tells you. Read more

 

3. Physical Therapy for the Treatment of Osteoporosis
Written by the physical therapy team at Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates with locations throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester, PA counties.

Osteoporosis is the leading cause of fractures in the elderly. It is a disease which causes diminished bone mass and leads to a decrease in bone quality which results in increased risk for bone fractures. Fractures can lead to functional disability, chronic pain, and at times, early death. Read more

Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts This February

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are four times more likely to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

According to the Office of Disease Prevention you can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease.

To lower your risk you can:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.
The American Heart Association also has some great resources on their website including tips to stay active, and how to make every move count!

If you need help finding exercises and activities that fit your lifestyle and abilities talk to your physical therapist. PT’s specialize in the science of movement, so who better to ask! If you don’t have a physical therapist make sure you check out our PT finder and get started on your path to a healthy heart this February!