Category Archives: General Information

lack of exercise worse than smoking

Lack of Exercise Worse than Smoking, Diabetes, and Heart Disease

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lack of exercise worse than smoking

As physical therapists, it is our job to promote movement and overall well-being.  Exercising regularly is linked to better physical and mental health and can help to prevent or delay heart disease, strokes, certain types of cancer, and diabetes. What is perhaps less known is that not being active can be harmful to your health. This lifestyle, called sedentary, has been linked to a number of preventable diseases. Researchers wanted to assess the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on all-cause mortality. The study, published in JAMA, suggests that a sedentary lifestyle has a larger impact on our health than previously thought.

About the study
The study by Jama included 122,007 participants at an academic medical center. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were 59% male. Among these, 13,637 died during the study.

The study followed participants for median of 8.4 years. Their physical fitness was measured using exercise treadmill testing and they were arranged by age and gender into the following performance groups:

  • Low—less active than 25% of participants
  • Below average—less active than 49% of participants
  • Above average—more active than at least 50% of participants
  • High—more active than at least 75% of participants
  • Elite—more active than almost 98% of participants

The study found that death from any cause was lowest among elite category. Death rates were highest among those in low category. It also found that the increase in risk of death linked to sedentary behavior was equal to or greater than the risk of death from smoking, diabetes, and heart disease.

How Does This Affect You?

Cohort studies are observational studies. These studies simply observe events as they unfold, but do not interfere or introduce factors that can affect the outcome. While they can’t show direct cause and effect, they can show a possible link between two factors. A large number of studies have found that sedentary behavior affects health, however this is the first that showed it may be as significant as smoking, diabetes, or heart disease.

If you are sedentary, start moving. Make changes in small increments to help you adjust. Starting a workout routine can be a challenge, but with the help of a physical therapist, you can learn how to get started and safely build up to a regular routine. Work toward at least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity aerobic activity. Here are some tips to help you get started:

  • Start with short episodes of activity. Try doing 3-4 bouts of walking for 10 minutes at a time, spread throughout the day.
  • Try out different activities to see which work best for you.
  • Look for opportunities to move during the day. Take stairs instead of the elevator, park a little further away, or walk instead of taking your car. Little bits can add up and help you reach longer goals.

If you are already active, keep it up! Make sure to schedule activity into your daily routine.

Need help getting started? We have some great ideas for you here!

exercise tips starting a workout program

SOURCES:

2008 physical activity guidelines for Americans Summary. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion website. Available at: https://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/summary.aspx. Accessed October 25, 2018.

Mandsager K, Harb S, et al. Association of cardiorespiratory fitness with long-term mortality among adults undergoing exercise treadmill testing. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1(6):e183605. Available at: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2707428?resultClick=3. Accessed October 25, 2018.

physical therapy after a car accident

Who Pays for Physical Therapy After a Car Accident?

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physical therapy after a car accident

Being involved in a car accident can be a life-changing event. The shock alone from the accident can lead to emotional trauma, particularly if you are injured. Ideally, you will let your insurance company handle all aspects of recuperating any compensation due to you. This will include monies for damage to your vehicle as well as for your injuries. In addition to medical expenses, you will need to collect compensation for lost wages and pain and suffering. If you have to go through physical therapy, you will want to be compensated for those expenses, as well. Ideally, you will not have to pay anything out of pocket for medical expenses.

Who Is Responsible for Your Physical Therapy Expenses in a Car Accident?

If you are injured in a car accident, there’s a good chance you may have to go through physical therapy to enhance your recovery. Your insurance will be able to help you pinpoint the party that is responsible for paying for the therapy. If the accident is deemed as your fault, your insurance company will pay for the therapy up to a certain amount. The exact policy you have will determine what this limit is.

If the other person is at fault, then their insurance will cover your physical therapy expenses. Oftentimes, there is a medical expense limit in place, such as $30,000. If your expenses exceed this limit, this doesn’t mean the at-fault party’s insurance is not going to cover more. In addition to medical expense coverage, the person’s insurance will likely offer you some type of settlement. Never should you accept the settlement if you don’t talk to a car accident lawyer first. This lawyer can help you determine if the settlement is reasonable. Much of the time, the lawyer can speak with the insurance company and get you a settlement that is two to three times as much as the initial offer, which will be of the utmost help when covering your physical therapy expenses.

If the other party does not have car insurance and you are not at fault, your insurance still may provide medical coverage to a certain amount. Beyond that amount, you would have to sue the at-fault party to cover your physical therapy expenses.

How Do I Recover Physical Therapy Expenses From an Accident?

The best way to recover physical therapy expenses is through the at-fault party’s insurance. Your insurance company or the other person’s insurance company may try to offer you a low-ball settlement amount. Have an attorney speak with the insurance companies for you and make sure you receive as much money as possible to pay for your physical therapy expenses, lost wages, pain, and suffering, and more.

How to Prove Your Expense?

No matter who is at fault for the accident, you will have to prove your physical therapy expenses in order to receive coverage for them. Many times, the physical therapist that you receive therapy from will bill the insurance company directly. If not, you will need to provide receipts that outline the services rendered as well as doctor notes detailing how the therapy relates to the injury sustained in the car accident.

Paying for Long-Term Injuries That Require Physical Therapy

Many people who are injured in a car accident will have to go through numerous sessions of physical therapy. Sometimes, these sessions can last for many years, especially if the person has suffered from a severe injury. Hopefully, the at-fault party’s insurance will have a liability coverage limit in place that exceeds what you have to pay for physical therapy. If not, you will have to use the settlement funds to pay for your expenses. You can speak with your physical therapist to determine how long it is predicted that it will take you to recover. From there, a settlement amount can be agreed upon with the at-fault party’ insurance that will likely cover your predicted expenses.

Who Do I Bring a Claim Against for Compensation If I Need Physical Therapy?

The entity to which you will bring a claim against for compensation if you need physical therapy will depend on the details of the accident. If you were at fault, you will need to speak with your own insurance company. However, because insurance language can be difficult to understand and because you likely don’t understand all of your rights, it is extremely important to have a qualified attorney speak with your insurance company for you. A physician can even speak with the insurance company to let them know how extensive your injuries are.

If another person is at fault, your claim will need to be brought against that person’s insurance or that person. Hopefully, you will have a lawyer handling all communications for you, allowing you to focus on your recovery and not have to worry about speaking with insurance companies. This lawyer can speak with your physical therapist to ensure everyone is on the same page regarding your injuries and compensation.

Collecting Compensation for Physical Therapy Costs After an Accident

There is an extensive process that must be followed in order to collect compensation for physical therapy after a car accident. All of the involved steps have to be completed thoroughly and effectively the first time around or the process has to be started over. Receiving all monies owed to you will be of the utmost help in covering your physical therapy expenses. It also will help pay for the daily living expenses that you incur while recovering, which can add up quickly and will become a financial burden since you won’t be able to work.

walking zombies

How Much Walking Can Zombies Do?

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walking zombies

As Halloween approaches it’s hard not to consider our monster what-if’s. So we just decided to go with it and take a look at just how far our limbs can carry us without sustaining injury, assuming they weren’t eaten during the unfortunate event that caused us to turn into zombies in the first place. Zombies quite frankly do a lot of walking; most of it is rather aimless but all in all they seem to cover quite a bit of distance. If we were doomed to spend eternity in a constant state of walk/run/hobble we would likely find that zombies might experience many of the same injuries that our fellow runners face.  Here’s a few that we came up with.

IT (Iliotibial) Band Syndrome is caused by improper footwear and the increasing of mileage and/or intensity too quickly. Symptoms manifest after a short period of running with a sharp pain on the outside of the knee.

Piriformis Syndrome is commonly caused by increase in mileage and/or intensity, and poor running mechanics associated with weak hips and core. The symptoms include local pain and tightness in the buttocks with possible tingling or numbness down the back of the leg.

Shin Splints, caused by improper footwear, lack of flexibility in the calves and running on hard surfaces, they cause a throbbing or aching pain along the front of the shin usually occurring during or following a prolonged walk or run.

Runner’s Knee, caused by increasing distance and/or as well as poor running mechanics. It’s symptoms include swelling and aching pain behind and/or around the kneecap and pain walking up and down stairs.

Now, how do we combat these injuries?

Always begin activity with a light warm up 10 minutes spent following that light rustle in the woods would serve you better than an all-out sprint towards your next unsuspecting victim

Stretch, reaching overhead to get the foot on the ledge or bending down to get to the snack hiding under the car

Rest, when that same snack locks you in a closet just go with it you could use the break.

And lastly shoes. Proper footwear is essential so let’s hope that you weren’t turned on flip flop day or in those 6 inch heels.

But in all seriousness whether you are a runner, walker, pro, novice, or zombie you never have to live in pain. Don’t be afraid to seek help if injury occurs, the best treatment for an injury is early management and education.

 

PT News PTandMe

PT News July 2018

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PT News PTandMe

This Month in PT News. Featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Early Referral to Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Reduces Cost and Improves Outcomes
Written by Mishock Physical Therapy with physical therapy locations throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester, PA Counties.

Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly medical condition associated with significant physical pain, impaired function, and loss of productivity. LBP is the leading cause of disability in the US exceeding $100 billion per year in treatment, reduced productivity and lost wages. Approximately, 70 million adults have LBP in any given 3 month period of time. (Health Stats, 2015). Read more

 

groin pain

2. Men. Do You Feel Like You’ve Been Kicked in the Groin?
Written by the Therapy Team at Ability Rehabilitation with Physical Therapy locations throughout Central, FL

Are you experiencing groin pain without a known injury? Do you have urinary hesitancy, urgency or frequency? Have you been diagnosed with prostatitis, and given antibiotics but achieved little to no relief?  Read more

hand stretch

3. Improve Your Mobility with These Range of Motion Exercises
Written by the Therapy Team at Desert Hand and Physical Therapy in Phoenix, AZ

Range of Motion Exercises, or ROM exercises, are important movement patterns designed to regain mobility in a joint such as the shoulder, knee, wrist or fingers. Regularly moving your joints can help reduce pain, keep your joints flexible, and improve strength and balance. Read more

Pros and Cons of Carb Loading

The Pros and Cons of Carb-Loading

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Pros and Cons of Carb Loading

Carb-loading diets have recently become popular in the sports and fitness community as a way to improve stamina and boost energy levels by increasing muscle glycogen levels by about 50%. Carbohydrates are your body’s main energy source when exerting yourself, and complex carbs such as legumes and whole grains are an essential part of every athlete’s diet. Carb-loading, however, is not a beneficial strategy for everybody. Loading up on carbohydrates has both its pros and its cons for different athletes.

What is Carb-Loading?

Carb-loading involves increasing carbohydrate intake around one to four days before a sporting event. Excess carbohydrates are stored in the muscle as glycogen, which offers a source of protein during physical exertion. The idea of carb-loading is to maximize glycogen stores in muscles before a competition, helping to improve stamina.

Loading up on carbs before an event works best for endurance sports such as marathon running, long-distance cycling, cross-country skiing, and lap swimming. It’s not as effective, however, for high-intensity team sports and everyday training. In general, carb-loading is best reserved for activities that involve more than 90 minutes of nonstop moderate to high-intensity exertion.

The Benefits of Carb-Loading

When applied to a training routine properly, carb-loading can help athletes to go for longer without experiencing fatigue. Normally, only small amounts of glycogen are stored in muscles, and when this supply runs out, exhaustion sets in. Carb-loading increases glycogen stores in tissues, giving individuals more energy at their disposal to use during a competition. Eating plenty of carbohydrates also helps to build muscle mass and prevent age-related muscle loss.

The Pitfalls of Carb-Loading

Following a carb-loading diet can cause more harm than good for certain populations. Casual gym goers and high-intensity sports teams should avoid too many carbohydrates, as such a meal plan can lead to water retention and weight gain. Not only will this affect physical performance, but may have long-lasting health implications. Carb-loading can also cause digestive problems such as bloating. Many foods that are rich in carbohydrates also contain dietary fiber which, while beneficial in small amounts, can lead to constipation and diarrhea in large doses.

While carb-loading can be beneficial for some individuals, it’s not necessarily an ideal strategy for all athletes. Eating an excess of carbohydrates only increases stamina for those who are competing in long-distance or endurance events. For daily workouts and most popular sports, carb-loading can actually detract from performance and lead to weight gain and digestive issues.

PT News PTandMe

PT News June 2018

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PT News PTandMe

This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Walking: An Effective Tool for Weight Loss and Maintenance
Written by The Jackson Clinics with locations throughout Northern VA.

The simplest exercise available is placing one foot in front of the other and walking. Because this is something we do every day, it is often overlooked as a valuable tool for weight loss. Read more

 

athletic trainer

2. The Roles of an Athletic Trainer
Written by the Therapy Team at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with locations throughout Great Rapids, MI

Athletic trainers not only help individuals return to the athletic field or a respective line of work but it also allows these athletic trainers to practice in a setting that best suits them and their interests.  Read more

physical therapy

3. Why Should I Try Physical Therapy
Written by the Therapy Team at Excel Physical Therapy in Palmer & Wasilla AK

Do you suffer from aches and pains in your joints? Physical therapy can help! Most people who suffer from pain wait it out to see if it will subside on it’s own, but what is the cause of the pain? Read more

How to Stay Active When You Work a Desk Job

How to Stay Active When You Work a Desk Job

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How to Stay Active When You Work a Desk Job

As the years go on, more and more jobs require sitting behind a desk or connecting with your computer screen, for what feels like infinite hours during the work week. It has been determined that desk workers sit for more than 1,000 hours per year due the sedentary lifestyle many businesses and jobs now require. An increase in stress levels, back and hip pain, digestion issues, and poor posture are all examples of health problems employees experience at their desk. In order to eliminate the aches and pains, motivate yourself and your coworkers to to increase their active lifestyle both inside and outside of your work shift! With these helpful tips, you and your colleagues will want to hop out of that desk chair more often!

1. Take Walks Outside
Being static at your desk all day forces your body to not only adjust itself to sitting position, but a restraint to the outside world as well. Taking the time to step away from your desk to take walks outside can increase blood flow and allow your body to shake out any tension or pressure caused by sitting down. As your blood is flowing faster, your energy levels rise. This ultimately helps with alertness and concentration so you’re performing to the best of your ability while working. If your company has some strict guidelines when it comes to leaving the office, boost your activeness by walking a few extra blocks during your daily commute. This will give you several more minutes of exercise before going into work!

2. Participate in Fitness Events
Another fantastic way to motivate yourself and other employees in your workplace is by participating in different fitness events within the community! 5K walks and runs, fitness classes, and many volunteering opportunities all include a good amount of physical activity. Also, they’re a great way for you and your coworkers to not only be active, but to support a charitable cause as well! If there aren’t any fitness related events in your town who can host your work crowd, organize one! Be sure to register your event online to skillfully keep track of your RSVP’s.

3. If Possible, Work at a Standing Desk
This might sound crazy to some, but remaining in a sitting position for numerous hours can be kind of exhausting. Your body might feel fine within the first hour or two of your day, but when the forth and fifth hours hit, pain and pressure become prominent in areas such as your neck, back and shoulders. Worrying about your discomforts at your job can be stressful. To reduce the built up soreness, try working to a standing desk for a while to switch your bodies normal sitting position to lessen those body aches. Standing at a desk can also assist in lowering blood sugar levels, which can be quite valuable to your health!

4. Take the Time to Stretch
Stretching your muscles can relieve a lot of stress placed on the body from sitting for long periods of time. Lengthening your joints can reduce the tightness that you might be feeling throughout the day. During your stretching session, hearing strange cracks or noises is normal. These are actually little “bubbles of nitrogen” that form around your joints that can pop when you extended your muscles.

The improvement of your mental, physical and metabolic health comes with changing your daily routine from consistently inactive to a day full of movement. It is vital to spread awareness about the harmful effects that can come with working a desk job, and how exercise can benefit the way your body feels and make going to work less immovable. Make sure to motivate other desk workers to pursue an active lifestyle to help boost the amount active workplaces!

Eat Well

Eat Well, Exercise Well, Be Well: Dietary and Fitness Guidelines

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Eat Well

When it comes to the secrets of living a healthy life, it seems that there are no secrets. From diet gurus to celebrities, everyone seems to have the answers on healthy living. Since the 1980s, the United States government has also weighed in, with dietary guidelines that it publishes every 5 years. The intent is to provide research-backed diet and physical activity recommendations to reduce the risk of diseases linked to poor diet and activity, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. Here is a round-up of the government’s latest key recommendations from the publication, 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

EAT WELL

Calories, Calories, Calories
In recent years, obesity has been a national concern, since it has been associated with serious conditions like cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. Controlling total calorie intake is essential to maintaining ideal body weight. If you are trying to lose weight, you will need to expend more calories than you take in. This means getting plenty of exercise and cutting down on foods that are high in calories.

So how many calories should you be consuming? This depends on several factors, such as age, gender, height, weight, and physical activity level. To keep calories under control, you want to focus on eating foods full of many nutrients, especially potassium, fiber, vitamin D, and calcium. You may want to talk with your doctor or a registered dietitian about an eating plan that is right for you. In general, try to keep calories in check. Aim to meet calorie needs, but not exceed them. Reducing portion size and eating more meals at home are great ways to avoid exceeding calorie needs. In addition, eating foods high in nutrients but lower in calories can help.

Foods to Enjoy

  • Eat a lot of fruits and vegetables—Fresh fruits and vegetables are lower in calories compared to processed foods. Focus on color when eating fruits and vegetables. Dark green, red, and orange vegetables are especially packed with good-for-you nutrients. When preparing a meal, try and fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables.
  • Eat a lot of whole grains—Examples of whole grains are brown rice, oatmeal, bulgur, and whole-wheat pasta. Your goal should be to make half your grains whole grains.
  • Have more dairy—Focus on low- or non-fat milk, cheese, and yogurt.
  • It is okay to eat certain fats—Some fats are okay to consume in moderation. These are monosaturated or polyunsaturated fats, which are found in foods like nuts and fish.
    Power up on protein—Seafood, lean meats, poultry, beans, and soy products are good sources of protein. Be sure to choose protein foods that are low in saturated fat and calories.

Fruits and Vegetables

Food to Eat Less

  • Limit refined grains—Examples of refined grains are white bread, corn flakes, grits, regular pasta, and white rice. These foods tend to be high in calories and sugar but low in fiber.
  • Limit foods containing added sugars—This includes sugar-sweetened drinks and snacks.
  • Limit foods high in saturated fats—This includes certain kinds of meat and dairy products (whole milk, cream, and butter). Less than 10% of calories should come from saturated fats.
  • Keep trans fat consumption as low as possible—You can do this by limiting foods containing solid fats and partially hydrogenated oils, such as margarine and baked goods.
  • Limit salt intake—Too much of it can increase your risk for high blood pressure, which can lead to kidney damage, heart disease, and stroke. On a daily basis, adults should consume less than 2,300 mg of sodium.
  • If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation —Women should consume no more than 1 alcoholic drink a day, while men should consume no more than 2 drinks a day. Also, keep track of the calories in each drink. Mixed drinks tend to have higher calories.

Preparing Your Plate
Remembering which foods to limit, and which to eat more of, may be daunting. To help you remember, the United States Department of Agriculture created a simple image of a sectioned plate as a guideline for healthy eating. The Choose My Plate guidelines emphasize nutrient-dense foods and beverages, such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low- or non-fat milk, beans, and nuts. If remembering how much and what to eat is a chore, you can just keep these simple things in mind to ensure that you are eating well when you sit down for a meal:

  • Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables.
  • When eating grains, make sure half your grains are whole grains.
  • Choose fat-free and low-fat (1%) milk products.
  • Avoid oversized portions.
  • Enjoy your food, but be mindful of how much you are eating. Try to eat less.
  • Drink water instead of sugary drinks.
  • When cooking, try to use less or no salt in the recipe. When you eat your meals, do not add any extra salt. Over time, you will adjust to less salt in your food.

You can find specific information on the ChooseMyPlate website.

Exercise Well
A nutritious diet and exercise go together for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. To achieve and maintain a healthy body weight, adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each week. Some examples of activities are brisk walking, biking, and swimming. Before starting any kind of exercise program, be sure to check with your doctor if you have any health issues that may limit your exercise program.

Be Well
Guidelines provide the foundation for a healthy lifestyle. But living a healthy lifestyle takes discipline and a positive attitude. Working with your doctor and perhaps other professionals, like a dietitian or fitness trainer, can be helpful in keeping you motivated and on track for reaching your health goals. Also, a healthy lifestyle should not be a chore, but something enjoyable.

Make exercise fun—a weekend hike, a lunch-hour walk with co-workers, or a pick-up game of basketball with your neighbor are just some ideas. And when mealtimes roll around, put on your creative chef hat! Come up with new approaches to breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus that incorporate fresh, nutrient-dense foods, and get friends and family involved in preparing meals. Experiment with herbs and spices to flavor your meals instead of the old salt standby. Armed with guidance, support, and motivation, a healthy lifestyle is within your reach!

Written by Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg, MA

RESOURCES:
Choose My Plate—US Department of Agriculture
http://www.choosemyplate.gov

Eat Right—Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
http://www.eatright.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Dietitians of Canada
http://www.dietitians.ca

REFERENCES:

2015-2020 Dietary guidelines for Americans. US Department of Agriculture and US Department of Health and Human Services. Available at: https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/. Accessed February 14, 2017.

BMI calculator. ChooseMyPlate—US Department of Agriculture website. Available at: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/weight-management-calories/weight-management.html. Accessed February 14, 2017.

Dietary interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated February 5, 2015. Accessed March 9, 2015.

What is MyPlate? US Department of Agriculture ChooseMyPlate website. Available at: https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate. Accessed February 14, 2017.

Last reviewed February 2017 by Michael Woods, MD, FAAP

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

Exercise Diabetes

Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes

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Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes, Healthy Eating

Lifestyle changes play an important role in managing type 2 diabetes. Activity decreases blood glucose and regular exercise helps by improving the way your body uses glucose.It can also reduce the risk of diabetes complications like heart disease.

How it Works
Glucose is a type of sugar that is used for energy. It is present in the blood and stored in the muscle and liver. A hormone called insulin helps most of the glucose move from the blood into cells. For those with type 2 diabetes, the body is resistant to insulin and over time the body has trouble making insulin at all. As a result, glucose has trouble getting to the cells, the body doesn’t get enough energy, and glucose builds up in the blood.

During exercise your working muscles have a greater need for energy and therefore glucose. As a result, glucose can enter the muscles and cells with far less insulin. This leads to a drop in blood glucose levels during exercise and for a few hours after while the muscles recover. This causes an immediate though temporary decrease in blood glucose.

Over time, regular activity can make the body less insulin resistant during activity or rest. This can lead to more long term benefits and may lead to a decrease in the need for medication.

In addition to helping control diabetes, exercise can also improve your overall health by decreasing weight, the risk of cardiovascular disease, and blood vessel damage.

Role of Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes, Healthy Eating

Exercise Recommendations
It is important that you talk to a doctor before starting an exercise program. You and your doctor can work together to choose an exercise program that is right for you.

For greatest benefits, you will need to do both aerobic exercises and strength training. Aerobic exercises include things like walking, bicycling, and swimming. Strength training exercises and classes use things like weight machines, free weights, and resistance bands. Adults should aim for:

  • At least 150 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise
  • 2-3 days of strength training per week
  • Try not to go more than 2 days without some type of activity

Look for opportunities during the day to add to your overall activity level. Take the stairs instead of the elevator, take a short walk during the day, or walk instead of taking the car. Even 10 minutes of activity can provide some immediate benefits.

Safety Steps
Certain diabetes medication can lead to a dip in blood glucose called hypoglycemia. Talk to your doctor to understand if this may be a problem for you. Be aware of signs of hypoglycemia during exercise such as dizziness, shaking, or confusion. If you have these symptoms, stop exercising and manage hypoglycemia. Let your doctor know about any episodes, since your medication may need to be adjusted.

Diabetes can also affect the nerves and blood flow to the feet. Inspect your feet frequently, since diabetes can sometimes lessen your ability to feel pain from a foot injury.

Keep in mind that exercise is only one piece of an overall diabetes management plan. You will also need to control your blood glucose levels with good nutrition.

by Cynthia M. Johnson, MA

RESOURCES:
American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:

Physical activity for type 2 diabetes. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T270048/Physical-activity-for-type-2-diabetes. Accessed February 20, 2017.

Physical activity is important. American Diabetes Association website. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/physical-activity-is-important.html. Updated December 27, 2016. Accessed February 20, 2017.

What we recommend. American Diabetes Association website. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/types-of-activity/what-we-recommend.html. Updated May 19, 2015. Accessed February 20, 2017.

Last reviewed December 2017 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Michael Woods, MD, FAAP  Last Updated: 12/22/2017

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

When Is the Time Right for Physical Therapy?

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physical therapy

Often, we end up in physical therapy based on the referral of our physician after dealing with and injury for a certain period of time. However, physical therapy can be used for many different ailments and can actually help cut down the time off work, off of sports and promote healing much faster.

Physical therapy can be used for many of your minor and major injuries. Following surgeries or traumas (accidents, dislocations, fractures, sprains) it can cause a considerable reduction in swelling and allow things to heal 75-80% faster than if without therapy. It has been shown that following surgery, the quicker someone goes for therapy, the less likely they are to stiffen up or have complications due to loss of range of motion. It also helps to significantly reduce pain and swelling.

Physical therapy is not only used following surgeries or sports injuries, but can be extremely helpful in preventing symptoms from getting worse and developing into more problems. If you’ve been having pain in your shoulder for 3 months or so, your body now has altered the way it moves your shoulder and in turn, you have developed some compensation patterns which could cause things to develop into other areas, such as your neck from your altered movements. This then, can lead to more significant problems which could have been easily avoided if therapy had been started and symptoms had gotten under control.

Remember, the quicker you get into therapy following an injury or persistent pain, the quicker your response time will be to therapy. If you are having some issues, talk to your physician about starting therapy. You don’t have to wait until it has a complete impact on your life or your recreational activities. Stop pain in your life and feel better by visiting one of our PT & Me physical therapists today.