Category Archives: General Information

Back to School Nutrition

Back to School Nutrition

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Back to School Nutrition

It’s almost time for school to start and we wanted to spend some time on Back to School nutrition! We have made it through most of the summer and it is time to take a moment and really think about how we would like to prepare our families for this coming school year so that we can all stay healthy. Most of us get excited about the barbeques and the summer parties where we usually eat burgers, fried chicken, French fries, pizza, potato salad, and that yummy barbeque brisket! But believe it or not, these foods are harder to digest during the summer because they require a strong digestive fire in the stomach and are naturally more insulating-which makes them perfect foods to eat come fall or wintertime!

You see, every season the qualities in nature change, and the qualities of the harvest change, which both influence every one of us. In the winter we are naturally more able to digest meat, poultry, dense root vegetables, and nuts when your digestive strength is naturally more potent. Although in the summertime, our body’s digestive strength is weaker and its digestive acid reduces in the summer which helps to avoid the risk of overheating, which might seem like a problem- but in comes Nature. It harvests certain fruits and vegetables in abundance during the summertime that are readily available and don’t require a big furnace to be properly cooked to be digested. Summer foods are cooked all summer long by the sun, on the vine, and when they are harvested, they are ready to be eaten to keep us energized.

If you or a loved one is feeling a bit boggy or bloated, with a bit of weight gain, indigestion, or is constipated, it might be because the body tends to accumulate the heat of the summer, therefore, weakening digestive strength. Overworking and overheating can trigger heartburn and other digestive issues related to excess stomach acid production. Eating cooling foods that are harvested in the summer can help with this. Extra servings of raw or lightly steamed vegetables and eating fruits will help you cool down naturally.

Here are some examples:

  • Cherries: support the health of joints, muscles, the cardiovascular system, lymphatic movement, and blood sugar balance through its high phenolic and anthocyanin content, also found to enhance exercise during and after by achieving quicker recovery times
  • Celery: a powerhouse for your digestive system, which is full of fiber and rich in antioxidants that have been shown to remove free radicals and helps to eliminate the bile sludge and gallbladder stones that might be causing inflammation, heartburn, acid reflux, and weight gain
  • Cilantro: is a good source of Vitamins A, K, and C, as well as copper, manganese, iron, magnesium, and calcium, also known as a natural blood purifier and detox agent (lead detoxifier), which will aid in inflammatory conditions such as arthritis
  • Watermelon: stacks up as 92% water and is very cooling by nature by removing heat because of its mild diuretic properties and is known to have great anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Athletes use it to build muscle because of its exceptionally high source of citrulline, which is used in the body as a precursor to human growth hormone (HGH)
  • Bell Peppers(All Colors): as a vegetable, it contains the highest source of Vitamin C at a whopping 157% DV(Daily Value) per cup, offers great amounts of phytonutrients such as beta-carotene and Vitamin B6, which are all great for protecting your skin from sun damage

Consider these tips if your digestion slows down as summer forges on:

If you are going to enjoy those yummy harder-to-digest foods, have them as a part of your lunch, during the middle of the day when your body’s digestive strength is at its peak
While it IS OK to eat these foods at this time, do your best to eat smaller portions of the barbeque and larger portions of fruit and vegetables.

Take a look at the list of foods below that are in harvest during the summer, add them to your grocery list, and make it a point to eat more of them!

Remember, there are no bad foods. The goal is not to stay away from “bad foods” but to enjoy more seasonal foods by shifting your focus on in-season foods throughout the year. Nature always provides the antidote to the extreme of each season with the ideal harvest to keep you and your family strong, healthy, energized, and focused this school year. Now more than ever, our health is at the forefront of our minds where it should be!

Summer Grocery List/Summer Harvest Foods:

Source: lifespa.com/pitta-diet

Vegetables/Fruit

  • Asparagus
  • Leafy Greens
  • Bell Peppers
  • Watermelon
  • Apricots
  • Apples
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cherries
  • Celery
  • Cilantro
  • Kale
  • Radishes
  • Grapes
  • Guavas
  • Mangoes
  • Melon (All types)
  • Snow Peas
  • Watercress
  • Zucchini
  • Okra
  • Artichokes
  • Cucumbers
  • Jicama
  • Lettuce
  • Peaches
  • Pineapple
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  • Avocadoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Lemons

Need to have a physical injury looked at before going back to school? Reach out to one of our partnering physical therapy clinics.

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Article was written by Vanessa Delgado. Vanessa is a nutrition enthusiast, who is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Nutrition and Foods at the University of Houston

Resources:

https://lifespa.com/superfoods-summer-edition/
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22280223/
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15219719/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874510/
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23692746/
https://lifespa.com/why-you-should-eat-cherries-in-the-summer/
https://lifespa.com/8-foods-gallbladder-sludge/
https://explore.globalhealing.com/foods-that-help-heartburn/
https://lifespa.com/the-benefits-of-cilantro-and-coriander/
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=14
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=31
https://lifespa.com/064-cool-your-pitta-this-summer/ 
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=50 

Vacation During Physical Therapy

Going on Vacation During Physical Therapy

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Vacation During Physical Therapy

For most of us, vacation equals relaxation, catching up with loved ones, or even some much-needed fun in the sun. We all deserve a break from time to time from our work schedules and daily tasks, and going on vacation during physical therapy this time of year isn’t uncommon. However, missing a few exercises between physical therapy visits can run the risk of losing some of your hard-earned progress. With just a little forethought and planning, you can stay active and healthy throughout your trip. If you are going on vacation during your rehabilitation program, here are a few key things you can do.

If you’re going on vacation during physical therapy the first thing you should do is talk to your physical therapist about a home exercise plan (HEP) that you can take with you so you’ll know exactly what you can do while you are away. Then, take a look at your itinerary and see what time you’ll have available for your exercise program. By planning ahead you’ll be more likely to follow through.

Second, plan times during your trip when you can do your HEP. It can be ideal to fit your routine first thing in the morning so you don’t have to worry about it the entire day. Lunchtime is another good option since it’s when your body is naturally most active. Making use of your breaks instead of a set time each day can also work.

Whether flying or driving, you’re likely going to be doing a lot of sitting and waiting at the beginning and end of your trip, which is a great time to get those exercises in. Also, try to take advantage of breaks during your vacation whether you’re…

  • Waiting for an uber
  • About to start a tour
  • Getting ready to eat
  • In a longer-than-it-should-be theme park line

Taking just a few minutes throughout the day to do some stretching and the prescribed exercises will help keep you from losing all those hard-fought gains you worked on with your physical therapist.

Finally, if you’ve had a major injury or are recovering from surgery, ask your physical therapist for advice on how to prevent re-injury while you are away from the clinic. By listening to your physical therapist, sticking to your home exercise plan, and avoiding situations that could increase your pain/injury, you should be able to have an amazing vacation full of fun!

If you are experiencing pain or loss of motion, we highly recommend you see one of our licensed and very talented physical therapists before going on vacation. Even if you haven’t started treatment yet, we can give you ways to keep from reinjuring your body further and get you on the schedule for your return.

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Four Exercises you can do at Home

Four Exercises You Can Do at Home While Watching TV

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Four Exercises you can do at Home While Watching TV

Watching television can be a fun way to spend a night at home, especially when there are so many great shows to choose from. Many conversations now start with, “Did you watch that new show on Netflix?” While it is fun to binge-watch a television show, sitting for long periods can be detrimental to your health. Fear not – we have 4 Exercises you can do at home while watching TV

Here are some exercises you can do while enjoying a good show!

  • Sit-To-Stand
  • Leg Figure Eights
  • Elevated Mountain Climbers
  • Tricep Dips

Exercises You Can do At Home While Watching TV

Need help getting started? These exercises will not work for everyone and should not be done if you are experiencing pain. An on-site or telehealth visit with a physical therapist can show you the safe way to exercise, the right number of repetitions, and how to progress the exercises correctly. Remember that all bodies are a little different; physical therapists can teach what is right for YOU!

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Looking for more?

Check out our recent blog on stretches you can do at work!

Stretches you can do at work

5 Ways to Overcome Stress at Work

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There is a close relationship between health and productivity. It is important to raise awareness about employee’s well-being as we celebrate National Employee Wellness Month. Many of the most effective stress control mechanisms are surprisingly physical in nature.  Encouraging them in the workplace can have a positive impact on the health and productivity of workers.

So how do we overcome stress? What can we do NOW, to help keep our mental health strong?

Here are a few ways to overcome stress and put a positive spin on your day and minimize stress levels:

  • Take Deep Breaths for an easy 3-5 minute exercise, sit up in a chair with your feet flat on the floor and hands on top of your knees. Breathe in and out slowly and deeply. Deep breathing oxygenates your blood.
  • Exercise causes your body to release endorphins and it helps clear the mind. Get up, and walk for a few minutes. If you can’t leave your desk, stretch! Stretching is a therapeutic exercise.
  • Eat Right and avoid sugary, fatty snack foods. Fruits and vegetables are always a good healthy option. Keep several at your desk and enjoy them.
  • Listen to Music, playing calm music has a positive effect on the brain and body. If you are feeling overwhelmed, take a small break and listen to your favorite tune. One recommendation is listening to ocean or nature sounds.
  • Schedule Time with family or friends to combat stress and/or loneliness by calling or meeting them after work. Schedule a group lunch outing or zoom with coworkers and have it on your calendar as something to look forward to.

The physical consequences of unattended stress can be far-reaching and, at some point, become more permanent than chronic. Chronic, non-traumatic pain typically does not require surgery, but it does require the skills of an experienced physical therapist to evaluate and treat the root of the problem. FIND A PT today and schedule an appointment!

physical therapy near me

REFERENCES:www.healthsearch.com, healthline.com, helpguide.org, and article by Elizabeth Scott, M.S., About.com Guide
www.corporatewellnessmagazine.com/article/june-is-national-employee-wellness-month

More Enjoyable Bike Ride

8 Tips for an Enjoyable Bike Ride

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Optimizing your bike and clothing isn’t just for competitive racers. Even if you’re just looking to ride a few miles recreationally, you can be more comfortable and have more fun by following our tips for a more enjoyable bike ride!

1. Check Tire Pressure
If your tires are too soft, you have a much higher chance of “pinching” a tube, causing a flat. Low pressure also increases rolling resistance, making it more difficult for you to ride at a normal speed. Check the sidewall of your tires for recommended pressure range; it doesn’t need to be at the maximum, but be sure it’s at or above the minimum.

2. Seat Angle
Everyone has a different preference on exact seat angle and position, but it should be roughly level. Deviations of 1-2 degrees up or down are OK, but don’t point up or down too much. This can place unnecessary pressure on pelvic soft tissue or the hands/wrists.

3. Seat Height
An old belief about seat height was that you must be able to touch the ground with both feet when sitting on the saddle. If you are very new to cycling, this does improve your ability to stay upright at very slow speeds. A seat that is too low, can put excess pressure on your knees and back, making it less efficient. A “proper” seat height has the knee at about 30 degrees of bend at the lowest point in the pedal stroke.

4. Stay Hydrated
Carry water with you on any ride longer than 30 minutes (shorter in hot conditions). You can use a backpack-style hydration pack, or a simple water bottle and cage. Almost all bicycles have bolts to hold a water bottle cage. Whichever method you choose, get familiar with it and get in the habit of using it often.

5. Know How to Change a Tube
Carry the items needed to replace a tube in the event of a flat tire. Your local bike shop can help you with choosing these items. These can all be carried in a bag under your seat. You don’t need to be Nascar pit-crew-fast at it, but you want to know how to fix a flat tire so you don’t end up stranded.

6. Like Lycra
Very few people think of bike shorts as a good fashion statement. However, if you’re riding more miles, especially in warm weather, they provide comfort that can’t be matched with basketball or running shorts.

7. Be Visible
Along with the bike shorts, make sure your t-shirt or jersey is a bright color that will keep you visible in traffic. If there is a chance you’ll be riding near or in darkness, be sure to have at least a rear and preferably also a front light on your bicycle.

8. Riding Shouldn’t Hurt
Sure, if you’re looking to get a hard workout or ride fast, your legs will feel the burn. However, if your body and bike are working together properly, riding shouldn’t cause any joint pain. If you can’t ride without getting neck, back, hip, or knee pain, consider having a professional look at either your body or your bike fit. Better yet, have a physical therapist who is versed in bike fitting address both at the same time. The answer to most aches and pains is rarely just in one area (bike fit or bodywork), and a combined approach will usually work best for alleviating pain and getting the most out of your ride.

bike_couple

Let Physical Therapy help you before your pain turns into an injury.

What an ache tells you:
•  It’s the first clue your body is telling you something is wrong.
•  Your body can accommodate the ache, but eventually, a breakdown will happen.
•  While you accommodate to your ache, weakness, and lack of flexibility start.
•  Once you have a breakdown, the pain will begin, and more than likely you will stop doing the activities you currently enjoy.

How physical therapy can help prevent sports injuries:
•  Modify exercise routines when you have a minor ache and pain (This does not always mean you need to stop exercising!)
•  Get assessed for weakness and flexibility issues to address biomechanical deficits.
•  Educate on faulty or improper posture or body mechanics during exercise
•  Educate and help with techniques on exercises that help your muscles stretch farther. Flexibility training helps prevent cramps, stiffness, and injuries, and can give you a wider range of motion.
•  Correct muscle imbalances through flexibility and strength training.
•  Alleviate pain.
•  Correct improper movement patterns.

Common Cycling-related pain and injuries that Physical Therapy can treat:
•  Low Back Pain
•  Neck Pain
•  Foot numbness
•  Shoulder pain
•  Muscle strains
•  Hand pain/numbness

This information about having a more enjoyable bike ride was written by Advanced Physical Therapy, a physical therapy group that uses progressive techniques and technologies to stay on the forefront in their field. Their staff is committed to providing patients with advanced healing techniques. For more information click here.

Struggling with an ache, pain, or simply need help getting your bike fitted? Our team can help make sure you get the most out of your time on your bike!

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Common Orthopedic Injuries

Most Common Orthopedic-Related Injuries

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Common Orthopedic Injuries

If you feel pain after a fall, sporting accident, or sudden movement, it is recommended that you have yourself checked by an orthopedic specialist. This is important to assess if you have sustained injuries that have affected your joints, bones, and connective tissues.

Orthopedic doctors recommend that you don’t treat any orthopedic injuries on your own or wait them out as it might lead to permanent damage. Some of the most common injuries orthopedic and sports injury clinics attend to include:

Fractures

Fracture is a prevalent risk, especially for those that engage in contact sports. Fractures have two primary classifications: simple and compound. The most common fractures in sports occur in the ankle, foot, wrist, collarbone, and hand.

A fractured bone can be extremely painful, and the area around the fracture often swells instantly. If you suspect you have a fracture, it is recommended that you seek medical attention right away.

Groin Strains

Groin strains often occur when you change direction drastically while exercising. Groin strains can also be attributed to overstretching of the groin muscles. Some of the most common symptoms of groin strain include swelling, bruising, and muscle spasms.

Hamstring Injuries

Hamstring injuries often occur when exercising or running. The hamstrings can get injured when they are overworked or stretched too far. In some instances, the muscle can also tear.

Individuals with hamstring injuries can feel severe pain in the back of their thighs. Some people will also feel a “pop.” Hamstring injuries can also cause bruising or inflammation at the back of the thigh.

Ankle Sprains

When the ankle is bent or twisted the wrong way, a sprain can occur. Ankle sprains can also happen if you wear improper footwear or get injured while playing sports. While a mild ankle sprain can get better with rest, severe cases will require orthopedic care.

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common orthopedic injuries

About the author

Dr. Charles R. Kaelin received his medical degree from the University of Louisville, Kentucky, and completed his orthopaedic training at Orlando Regional Center in Orlando, Florida. Dr. Kaelin also received training in Sports Medicine at Alabama Sports Medicine with Dr. Lemak, specializing in sports medicine and workman’s compensation injuries. He has been a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) since 1990. He is a charter member of the International Cartilage Research Society, a Founding member of the AAOS Education Enhancement Fund (AAOS), and a past editorial board member for the American College of Sports Medicine Health and Fitness Journal.

Depending upon the injury, patients may benefit from physical therapy for further rehabilitation. Our licensed orthopedic professionals work each day to help patients back to the activities they love most. Find the location nearest you today!

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cold weather safety

Keeping Extremities Warm in Winter

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OUTDOOR SAFETY
Highlights
• Dress warmly and stay dry.
• Wear a hat, scarf, and mittens.
• Avoid frostbite.
• If you have to do heavy outdoor chores, dress warmly and work slowly.
• Avoid walking on ice or getting wet.
• Notify friends and family where you will be before you go hiking, camping, or skiing.
• Avoid traveling on ice-covered roads, overpasses, and bridges if at all possible.
• If you are stranded, it is safest to stay in your car.

When the weather is extremely cold, and especially if there are high winds, try to stay indoors. Make any trips outside as brief as possible, and remember these tips below to protect your health and safety.

DRESS WARMLY AND STAY DRY
Adults and children should wear:
• a hat
• a scarf or knit mask to cover the face and mouth
• sleeves that are snug at the wrist
• mittens (they are warmer than gloves)
• water-resistant coat and boots
• several layers of loose-fitting clothing

Be sure the outer layer of your clothing is tightly woven, preferably wind-resistant, to reduce body-heat loss caused by wind. Wool, silk, or polypropylene inner layers of clothing will hold more body heat than cotton. Stay dry—wet clothing chills the body rapidly. Excess perspiration will increase heat loss, so remove extra layers of clothing whenever you feel too warm. Also, avoid getting gasoline or alcohol on your skin while de-icing and fueling your car or using a snowblower. These materials in contact with the skin greatly increase heat loss from the body. Do not ignore shivering. It’s an important first sign that the body is losing heat. Persistent shivering is a signal to return indoors.

AVOID FROSTBITE AND HYPOTHERMIA
When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Prolonged exposure to cold will eventually use up your body’s stored energy. The result is hypothermia or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it is happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.

Hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat, or submersion in cold water.

Frostbite is an injury to the body that is caused by freezing. Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and color in affected areas. It most often affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes. Frostbite can permanently damage the body, and severe cases can lead to amputation. The risk of frostbite is increased in people with reduced blood circulation and among people who are not dressed properly for extremely cold temperatures.

AVOID EXERTION
Cold weather puts an extra strain on the heart. If you have heart disease or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s advice about shoveling snow or performing other hard work in the cold. Otherwise, if you have to do heavy outdoor chores, dress warmly and work slowly. Remember, your body is already working hard just to stay warm, so don’t overdo it.

UNDERSTAND WINDCHILL
The Wind Chill index is the temperature your body feels when the air temperature is combined with the wind speed. It is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by the effects of wind and cold. As the speed of the wind increases, it can carry heat away from your body much more quickly, causing skin temperature to drop. When there are high winds, serious weather-related health problems are more likely, even when temperatures are only cool.

AVOID ICE
Walking on ice is extremely dangerous. Many cold-weather injuries result from falls on ice-covered sidewalks, steps, driveways, and porches. Keep your steps and walkways as free of ice as possible by using rock salt or another chemical de-icing compound. Sand may also be used on walkways to reduce the risk of slipping.

snow war

BE SAFE DURING RECREATION
Notify friends and family where you will be before you go hiking, camping, or skiing. Do not leave areas of the skin exposed to the cold. Avoid perspiring or becoming overtired. Be prepared to take emergency shelter. Pack dry clothing, a two-wave radio, waterproof matches and paraffin fire starters with you. Do not use alcohol and other mood altering substances, and avoid caffeinated beverages. Avoid walking on ice or getting wet. Carefully watch for signs of cold-weather health problems.

BE CAUTIOUS ABOUT TRAVEL
• Listen for radio or television reports of travel advisories issued by the National Weather Service.
• Do not travel in low visibility conditions.
• Avoid traveling on ice-covered roads, overpasses, and bridges if at all possible.
• If you must travel by car, use tire chains and take a mobile phone with you.
• If you must travel, let someone know your destination and when you expect to arrive. Ask them to notify authorities if you are late.
• Check and restock the winter emergency supplies in your car before you leave.
• Never pour water on your windshield to remove ice or snow; shattering may occur.
• Don’t rely on a car to provide sufficient heat; the car may break down.
• Always carry additional warm clothing appropriate for the winter conditions.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU GET STRANDED
Staying in your vehicle when stranded is often the safest choice if winter storms create poor visibility or if roadways are ice covered. These steps will increase your safety when stranded:
• Tie a brightly colored cloth to the antenna as a signal to rescuers and raise the hood of the car (if it is not snowing).
• Move anything you need from the trunk into the passenger area.
• Wrap your entire body, including your head, in extra clothing, blankets, or newspapers.
• Stay awake. You will be less vulnerable to cold-related health problems.
• Run the motor (and heater) for about 10 minutes per hour, opening one window slightly to let in air. Make sure that snow is not blocking the exhaust pipe—this will reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
• As you sit, keep moving your arms and legs to improve your circulation and stay warmer.
• Do not eat unmelted snow because it will lower your body temperature.
• Huddle with other people for warmth.

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For more information about winter safety visit: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/index.asp

For more PTandMe cold weather safety tips to keep you out of harm’s way this winter check the articles below!

snow shoveling safety PTandMe   Winter Safety PTandMe

COVID Recovery for healthy individuals

Introducing REHAB-19

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REHAB-19 COVID Recovery for healthy individuals

It’s not uncommon for patients that experience a milder form of COVID-19 to experience longer-lasting symptoms.  To help patients combat these lasting physical ailments we have created a Rehab-19 Program designed specifically to restore energy for healthy active bodies.  If you have recovered from COVID-19 and you’re not quite feeling like yourself yet, our licensed team of physical therapists can help get you the rest of the way.

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 Some impairments that can last several weeks or months after COVID include:

  • Decreased lung capacity
  • Decreased strength
  • Decreased balance, mobility, and difficulty walking
  • Decreased endurance
  • Abnormal breathing patterns
  • Muscle aches and pain
  • Musculoskeletal pains from coughing/bed rest
  • Chronic fatigue

To help patients overcome these obstacles, our clinicians will provide patients with a comprehensive evaluation to develop an individualized treatment plan to overcome impairments. Once your evaluation is complete, you will begin to work on your personalized reconditioning program.  Both in-clinic and virtual appointments through Telehealth are available for this treatment plan.

The types of strategies that may be included in your REHAB-19 recovery program may include:

By choosing to go to physical therapy for a REHAB-19 program you will be back to your normal energy levels in no time. Our clinicians are experts at helping patients get back to their best selves.  The benefits of physical therapy after COVID-19 include:

  • Improve cardiopulmonary endurance/stamina
  • Improve balance and mobility
  • Return to work, sports, hobbies, and normal activities
  • Restore flexibility and strength
  • Improve breathing mechanics

Rehabilitation programs for patients that have spent time in the ICU are also available. If you are having trouble getting back to your former activity levels, or simply don’t quite feel like yourself, we’re here to help!

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts This February

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are four times more likely to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

According to the Office of Disease Prevention you can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease.

To lower your risk you can:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.
The American Heart Association also has some great resources on their website including tips to stay active, and how to make every move count!

If you need help finding exercises and activities that fit your lifestyle and abilities talk to your physical therapist. PT’s specialize in the science of movement, so who better to ask! If you don’t have a physical therapist make sure you check out our PT finder and get started on your path to a healthy heart this February!

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PT News December 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November & December 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

blood clots while traveling

1. Blood Clots: Don’t Bring Them on Your Holiday Trip

Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The coming holidays and winter breaks mean traveling for many people. But spending more than four hours in a car, bus, train or plane leaves you at moderate risk for blood clots in your legs caused by a lack of circulation. These can sometimes break free and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism. The longer you are immobile, the greater your risk of developing a blood clot.  Read more

 

Physical Therapy for Cancer Patients

2. How Physical Therapy Can Benefit Cancer Patients

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Idaho. 

When faced with cancer, having the right medical and support team becomes exponentially more critical. Oncology teams skillfully lead the way in managing a myriad of symptoms and complications that arise. In conjunction with oncology teams, physical therapy is an integral part of healthcare as they help patients regain their functional strength and balance. Physical therapists are serviceable in managing edema and a multitude of other cancer-related dysfunctions in addition. Read more

 

Physical Therapy

3. Are You Missing Out on Free Physical Therapy?

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Have you met your annual insurance deductible? If you have, it’s a great time to come in to see your physical therapist! Many find they can access physical therapy at low or no cost after their deductible has been met. Most deductibles reset on January 1st, so NOW is the time to take advantage of your access to physical therapy.   Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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