Category Archives: General Information

physical therapy online

Now Providing Online Physical & Occupational Therapy Care

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physical therapy online

Our partnering clinics are now providing physical and/or occupational therapy care!

There are now two ways to help patients recover from injury:

  • In Person:We are still open and welcoming patients to receive the care they need in our clinic. Click here for more information about the precautions we are taking in the clinics to keep you safe.
  • Online Through Telehealth: Our partnering therapists can still complete a visit for patients that are unable to make it into the clinic.  They will use both VIDEO and AUDIO so that they can have two way communication during these physical and/or occupational therapy visits.

In order to make your telehealth appointment a success, here are the things you will need access to: 

  • Internet access
  • A device with a camera (computer, phone, tablet) that has access to email
  • Space to exercise

online physical therapy

For more information about online physical and occupational therapy services please contact your clinic directly.

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*Not all locations may be set-up for online appointments. 

Stay Active While Social Distancing

4 Ways to Stay Active While Social Distancing

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Stay Active While Social Distancing

Most of us have found ourselves at home looking for things to do. Even though we may not be able to make it to the gym or to a group class with friends, there are still ways to stay active while social distancing at home.

Here are our top 4 ways to keep moving.

  1. Go for a walk or run: Getting some fresh air and going for a walk or run in an uncrowded location is a great way to get some exercise in. The CDC recommends 6 feet of distance between yourself and others, so make sure you choose a path or trail that allows for space.
  2. Do housework: You have stocked up on cleaning supplies; now it’s time to get some exercise out of it! Whether it’s washing dishes, vacuuming, or dusting, the time spent on your feet and moving around can add up to a fully productive and active day – not to mention the result of having a clean living space.
  3. Have a dance party: It might not be the same as a traditional Zumba class, but all you need to get the party started is some music that can get you moving. Whether it be salsa, a line dance, or maybe even the floss, dancing is a sure way to get your heart rate up.
  4. Living room resistance training: Squats, lunges, planks, and push-ups can all be done at home without the need of a gym or weights. These exercises use your body weight to help train. If you need guidance on getting started or making sure you have exercises that you can do safely, please call us for help.

We hope you have fun staying active with these exercise ideas. If you need help getting started or have questions, please reach out to any of our physical therapy clinics. They can work with you to create an in-home exercise plan that works for you and your ability levels.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News January 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout January 2020. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. How to Keep Up With Your New Year’s Resolutions

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout San Antonio, TX.

Did you set a health or fitness goal for this new year/new decade? Maybe it was running, joining a gym, drinking more water or even getting more sleep. No matter what you choose, it’s important to have a goal in mind. We have all heard the statistics on resolutions, especially when it comes to fitness-related resolutions.  Read more

 

2. Winter Activities Foster Year-Round Fitness

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Virginia and Maryland. 

The urge to “hibernate” in winter is strong, even for us humans. However, you are better off staying in shape than struggling to catch up come spring. And winter exercise benefits more than just physical fitness; it is also a powerful antidote for the winter blues. Read more

 

3. What is a Hand Therapist

Written by Desert Hand and Physical Therapy an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Phoenix, AZ.

Physical therapy is something we may have all heard about, but hand therapy might be unfamiliar territory. Although physical therapy and hand therapy are similar, there are some major differences between the two that should be understood.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

benefits of a home exercise program

Why Should I Do My Home Exercise Program?

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benefits of a home exercise program

When a patient walks in for physical therapy, one of the things they are sent home with is a home exercise program. But why do they do that? Aren’t they supposed to take care of everything while you are in the clinic?  These are questions that may run through your head, but what exactly are the benefits of a home exercise program? If you’re on the fence of whether or not to take your HEP seriously, we’re here to tell you why you should.

  • Continuation of forwarding progression in rehabilitation: Physical and occupational therapists tailor each program to the abilities and strengths of each patient. A patient that completes their home exercise program is more likely to excel in the one-on-one sessions at the clinic and experience fewer setbacks in rehabilitation.
  • Increases level of mobility and endurance: Exercise in the home is designed to continue the progress of the clinic visit by increasing a patient’s flexibility and stamina. A good home exercise program allows a patient to increase function and improve muscle memory so that progress is gained rather than lost from one visit to another.
  • For some patients, therapy doesn’t end at discharge: A home exercise program can help a patient remain pain-free and functional without having to pay for repeat visits and costly medical bills. For patients experiencing chronic pain – a home exercise program is a ticket to staying out of the doctor’s office.

Despite the benefits of a home exercise program, patients have trouble following through on their home exercise program goals. We’re going to go over some of the more common excuses:

  • I don’t have time, because life at home is too busy: It can be hard, especially for those running a household with multiple schedules to accommodate. However, a physical therapist can offer suggestions on working these into your schedule. Some exercises can be done at work, at home, on the playground. If time is truly a concern than don’t be afraid to let the therapist know.
  • It hurts: Some pain is considered normal – it’s a normal part of exercise. However, if you are doing an exercise and something feels wrong, let your physical therapist know immediately. Don’t wait until your next appointment and tell yourself you will take care of it then. It could be something as simple as not doing the exercise correctly and they can talk you through it over the phone. Communication is a large part of rehabilitation and your therapist wants to know if something is causing concern.
  • Not motivated: Not seeing the point of the exercises your therapist gave you – ask them why it is so beneficial. Going to see a physical therapist 2-3 times a week alone without doing home exercises will not be enough to maintain muscle strength and flexibility. Healthy habits begin with persistence. If you need motivation talk to your therapist, they are born motivators and want nothing more than to watch you succeed. Enlist the help of family or friends to keep asking about your progress.

Physical therapists may utilize print copies of exercises or they may choose to go utilize a digital version that you can access from a mobile device. No matter the delivery, the goal for each is the same. To help you heal more effectively. If you have questions about your home exercise program and what it contributes to your recovery talk to your physical therapist. Education and understanding are crucial to making sure your experience in recovery is successful. If you need help finding a physical therapist to answer your questions, we have you covered in our “Find a PT” section.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News December 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

nutrition strategies

1. Effective Nutrition Strategies

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout greater Grand Rapids, MI.

How do you stay on target with eating healthy and being active? Between work schedules, kid’s schedules, appointments, and change of plans, finding time to exercise and eat right can sometimes feel impossible. Read more

 

crossfit

2. Is Crossfit Right For You?

Written by Riverview Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations in Southern Maine. 

CrossFit is no longer a form of exercise performed in small gyms; it is a phenomenon that has taken the world by storm. At its roots, CrossFit is a popular form of exercise utilizing high-intensity fitness programming that incorporates elements from many disciplines: including weightlifting, traditional cardiovascular exercise (running, jumping rope, biking, rowing), and basic gymnastic movements. Read more

 

lymphedema physical therapy

3. Lymphedema Therapy – You Don’t Have to Live with Chronic Swelling

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties in PA.

One cause of chronic swelling could be lymphedema. This is a condition where swelling occurs in the extremities due to a compromised or damaged lymph system. Lymph is the fluid that bathes the cells with needed nutrients, oxygen, and white blood cells provided by the circulatory system.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

raking injury prevention tips

Raking injury prevention tips

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raking injury prevention tips

It’s Fall again! time for hot chocolate, bonfires and to watch the leaves turn. Our homes are cozier this time of year as we prepare for holidays and the arrival of loved ones. However, autumn does come with some challenges. I know you might be making a list and checking it twice but holiday shopping is not the only challenge to be found this season. One of the biggest challenges is yard work because when those leaves fall its time to rake them. On the plus side  yard work such as raking leaves count as moderate exercise! Now some not so good news: it is actually very easy to injure yourself if you are using improper techniques. The colder weather already puts you at risk for muscle pain- muscles constrict in cold weather and are more prone to cramps and strain. Add to that all of the twisting, turning, bending, pulling, pushing, and reaching of raking. And since these are seasonal activities, you are probably using muscles that may not be a limber as expected. All of these factors can contribute to injury. Common injuries include upper and/or lower back strain, neck pain, and shoulder pain.

Here are some tips to prevent injury when raking leaves and other yard work:

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General Tips:

  • Do stretching exercises before and throughout the course of your yard work
  • Stand as straight as possible
  • Bend at the knees, not the waist, when you pick up things
  • Look into purchasing ergonomic tools. An ergonomic tool is one that has been engineered in such a way that it helps protect you from injury
  • Avoid repetitive twisting and turning
  • Take breaks. This will allow your muscles rest and will minimize strain.

Raking Tips:

  • When raking leaves, use a “scissors stance.” Right foot forward and left foot back for a few minutes, then switch
  • Hold rake handle close to your body and stand up straight
  • Change sides frequently to avoiding overusing one side of your body, but avoid twisting when you pass the rake from one side to the other
  • When leaves are under the rake, pull them straight back towards your body

If you experience a winter injury from raking, fall sports, doing day-to-day activities, etc. please don’t hesitate to find a physical therapist. They will be able to take a look at the injury and determine whether or not physical therapy may be the best choice moving forward. With direct access to physical therapy, you have more control than ever before when it comes to your care.

 Find a physical therapist near you!

physical therapy near me

Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

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Choosing the Right Physical Therapist

Whether it be from radiating pain down your leg from a herniated disc, or a frozen shoulder insidiously appearing, physical therapists provide non-invasive treatments that can give patients their life back when pain and dysfunction dominate their day-to-day happenings. Physical therapists manage a wide variety of ailments,
often quickly transitioning between rehabilitation for a reconstructed knee or shoulder, to eliminated debilitating cervicogenic headaches, to helping your newborn infant right their head when torticollis develops. When it comes to choosing the right physical therapist, most people have no idea what qualifies them to manage such a wide variety of diagnoses so efficiently and effectively.

Physical therapists are often considered to be an insurance-reimbursed personal trainer. So many times, patients enter my clinic asking for a “few stretches” so they can get back on their way. Therapy, however, encompasses more than providing patients with a workout. A physical therapist’s knowledge and education provides them with the foundation to not only treat your immediate diagnosis but to identify secondary diagnoses that may have been missed in your initial physician’s examination and to manage all of the concurrent problems that develop during your recovery. To do this, extensive knowledge and understanding of anatomy and all of the body systems is necessary.

Collegiate Physical Therapy Degrees

Physical therapists now need to attend school for a minimum of 7 years. This includes 4 years of prep work for the highly competitive application to graduate school, which tacks on the addition 3 years, at minimum. While in graduate school, a physical therapy student gains extensive knowledge of every system within the body. In addition to the obvious musculoskeletal system, the cardiovascular, neurological, and pulmonary systems are studied at length. This gives physical therapists the foundation for caring for a wide variety of patients including those with cystic fibrosis, acute heart attacks, spinal cord injuries, and ACL reconstructions. Clinical rotations are also fundamental to a physical therapist’s education. 20 percent of the physical therapist’s education is spent on full-time clinical rotations through most fields of practice. At the completion of graduate school, a physical therapist is awarded their degree, qualifying them to sit for the national physical therapy board examination. Some of the most common degrees that physical therapists have earned are:

PT (Physical Therapist)

A bachelor’s degree in physical therapy. This was the degree offered for years before physical therapists could become be licensed.  Colleges and universities then transitioned the program into a master’s degree, which ultimately turned into a  3-year post-baccalaureate degree.

MPT (Masters of Physical Therapy)

A 2-year post-baccalaureate degree that provides graduates with the entry-level education necessary to be eligible for the board examination. This degree is no longer offered, in favor of all exiting students now receiving the DPT degree.

DPT (Doctor of Physical Therapy)

A 3-year post-baccalaureate degree that provides graduates with the entry-level education necessary to be eligible for the board examination. The added year in school is meant to provide students with more time in clinical rotations, exposure to business and management practices, and further education in research methods. This degree is now the standard for entry-level education and prepares students for direct access to physical therapy.

Additional Certifications

Much like physicians and nurses, school and learning do not stop when the graduation hat is tossed in the air; school is only the beginning of a life-long education process. Continuing education is the cornerstone of a therapist’s career. New research is always being published and medical techniques are always evolving within the broad field of medicine. Staying knowledgeable of these changes is necessary for a therapist to continue to provide their patients with superior care. Continuing education not only provides physical therapists to further their education on the latest and greatest but allows them to develop specializations in specific areas within the field. While every therapist takes a board exam at the end of school to become board-certified, therapists can also receive additional board-certifications when mastery of a subfield
is obtained. A few of the common additional certifications in the outpatient physical therapy field are listed below.

OCS (Orthopedic Certified Specialist)

A board-certified specialization in orthopedics that is earned beyond the entry-level degree which recognizes advanced clinical knowledge, skills, and abilities
in the orthopedics field. Candidates need to log a minimum of 2,000 direct patient care hours in their specialization field of practice and pass a
board examination to earn the distinction.

CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist)

Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists apply scientific knowledge to improve an athlete’s individual training and performance. They may also make recommendations regarding nutrition and injury prevention. This certification is offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Cert. MDT (Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy)

This certifies a physical therapist in providing mechanical diagnosis and therapy of the spine, a method that has been proven to be both effective and efficient in the treatment of spinal pathologies. This certification is offered through the McKenzie Institute and requires candidates to participate in a four-part certification course, as well as pass a written and clinical examination upon completion of the course.

In an every expanding medical field with alternative treatments growing by the day, it is important to know your professional’s qualifications for their treatments and the knowledge they bring to each individual case. Mastery in a field often requires years of education and years of experience. While your therapist may provide a relaxed environment filled with what seems like simple exercise and manual techniques, he or she brings to your individual situation skills that have taken years to develop.

If you need help choosing the right physical therapist, find a physical therapy clinic near you and ask them about their specialties.  Many physical therapists are proud of their skill sets and will be happy to go over any questions you may have!

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5 reasons why you need PT

Top 5 Reasons Why you Need Physical Therapy

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5 reasons why you need PT

Did you know that physical therapists can do so much more than help you recover from an injury?  Research shows that the faster you initiate care, the lower the cost and the faster you can return to the game of life. Get the care you deserve when you need it. We’ve listed our top five reasons why you need physical therapy – so check it out!

1. YOU ARE IN PAIN

If you are experiencing pain, physical therapy can help you treat the cause and not just the symptoms of your pain. Physical therapists work one-on-one with patients to achieve long term solutions without the use of expensive prescriptions or tests, saving them both time and money.

2. PREVENT SURGERY

Physical therapy works to reduce pain and heal injuries. It works so well in fact that in many cases it has been proven to remove or reduce the need for surgery. In the event that surgery is needed a pre-op visit can help make recovery easier and safer.

3. FALLEN MORE THAN ONCE IN THE PAST YEAR

According to the CDC, falls are the leading cause of injury and death for Americans over 65. Fall prevention programs offered by physical therapists are designed to increase independence with functional activities, functional mobility, and safety awareness while decreasing fall risk.

4. PREVENT SPORTS INJURIES

Physical therapists work with athletes on many levels to prevent injury while promoting improved performance. By evaluating body movements and muscle strength – physical therapists can tailor programs not only to the sport but to the individual athlete. Injury recovery programs are also available.

5. REACH OVERALL HEALTH GOALS

Physical therapy can help those that have had trouble with mobility or are looking to improve strength and overall health. Physical therapists are able to tailor programs to each patient’s ability levels in order to improve confidence and independence while reducing the risk of future injury.

Physical therapists are trained to help patients in a variety of different ways. If you believe that you need physical therapy you can easily find a PT near you and get started today!

physical therapy near me

 

recovery after an injury

The 4 Stages of Recovery After an Injury

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recovery after an injury

Soft tissue injuries are commonly categorized depending on a time frame beginning with the date the injury occurred. Physical therapy programs can help make recovery after an injury easier on the body.  Physical therapists are experts in the diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue injuries. They can also determine your phase of healing and the best techniques to continue the path to recovery.

Stage 1: Acute Stage | Protection Phase

A soft tissue injury is termed as acute from the initial time of injury and while the pain, bleeding, and swelling is at its worst. Your body’s aim at this point is to protect your injury from further damage. The usual time frame for your acute symptoms to settle is two to four days post-injury, but this can vary depending on how you treat your injury.

Treatment consists of modalities such as:

to help control inflammation and pain. Gentle movement can be added to maintain mobility.

Stage 2: Sub-Acute Stage | Repair Phase

A soft tissue injury is termed as sub-acute when the initial acute phase makes a transition to repairing the injured tissues. This phase commonly lasts up to six weeks post-injury when your body is busy laying down new soft tissue and reducing the need to protect your injury as the new scar tissue begins to mature and strengthen.

  • Modalities are still used as needed for inflammation.
  • Strengthening exercises are added as tolerated to stabilize around the injured area and begin to increase function.

Stage 3: Late Stage | Remodelling Phase

Your body does not magically just stop tissue healing at six-week post-injury. Healing is a continuum. At six weeks post-soft tissue injury your healing tissue is reasonably mature but as you stretch, strengthen and stress your new scar tissue it often finds that it is not strong enough to cope with your increasing physical demand.

When your body detects that a repaired structure is still weaker than necessary, it will automatically stimulate additional new tissue to help strengthen and support the healing tissue until it meets the demands of your normal exercise or physical function.

The period between six weeks and three months post-injury is commonly referred to as the remodelling phase.

  • Treatment will focus on progression back to pre-injury level and modality use is minimized.
  • Strengthening exercises are more dynamic and in several planes of motion.

Stage 4: Final Stage | Ongoing Repair and Remodelling

The final stage of tissue repair can last from 3 months up to 12 months. Scar tissue needs time to properly align and gain tensile strength needed for the forces placed on it. This phase focuses on improving the quality of the new tissue and preventing re-injury.

  • Treatment will be sport and activity specific to prepare for demands placed on the injured site.
  • Education on preventing re-injury is key!

Every injury faces its own challenges and breakthroughs. For more detailed information about a specific soft tissue injury reach out to your physical therapist. They can bring you successfully through each stage of recovery after an injury.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News August 2019

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout August 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Physical Therapy Direct Access

1. Physical Therapy Direct Access is Coming to Texas
Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Starting September 1, 2019, it will be easier to get Physical Therapy in Texas, thanks to local San Antonio State Representative, Ina Minjarez (D) who drafted HB29, a handful of other State Reps who co-sponsored the bill, the Texas Medical Association, and the Texas Orthopedic Association.  Read more

 

House workout

2. Get Your Housework(Out) Done!

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR and the surrounding communities. 

Let’s get honest for a second though and realize not all moments are adventure packed (at least for your average community member). Here are some fantastic ways to make even the down time productive and moving you in a healthy direction… and you get the chores done! Read more

 

AEW Ability Rehab

3. Ability Rehabilitation Played Key Role at AEW’s Two Florida Based Events

Written by Ability Rehabilitation an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater Tampa and Orlando.

Florida-based Ability Health Services & Rehabilitation worked closely with All Elite Wrestling (AEW) to provide athletic training and physical therapy care to the wrestlers at the recent FYTER FEST and FIGHT FOR THE FALLEN events, which both took place last month in Daytona Beach and Jacksonville, respectively. Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me