Category Archives: General Information

cold weather safety

Keeping Extremities Warm in Winter

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OUTDOOR SAFETY
Highlights
• Dress warmly and stay dry.
• Wear a hat, scarf, and mittens.
• Avoid frostbite.
• If you have to do heavy outdoor chores, dress warmly and work slowly.
• Avoid walking on ice or getting wet.
• Notify friends and family where you will be before you go hiking, camping, or skiing.
• Avoid traveling on ice-covered roads, overpasses, and bridges if at all possible.
• If you are stranded, it is safest to stay in your car.

When the weather is extremely cold, and especially if there are high winds, try to stay indoors. Make any trips outside as brief as possible, and remember these tips below to protect your health and safety.

DRESS WARMLY AND STAY DRY
Adults and children should wear:
• a hat
• a scarf or knit mask to cover face and mouth
• sleeves that are snug at the wrist
• mittens (they are warmer than gloves)
• water-resistant coat and boots
• several layers of loose-fitting clothing

Be sure the outer layer of your clothing is tightly woven, preferably wind resistant, to reduce body-heat loss caused by wind. Wool, silk, or polypropylene inner layers of clothing will hold more body heat than cotton. Stay dry—wet clothing chills the body rapidly. Excess perspiration will increase heat loss, so remove extra layers of clothing whenever you feel too warm. Also, avoid getting gasoline or alcohol on your skin while de-icing and fueling your car or using a snow blower. These materials in contact with the skin greatly increase heat loss from the body. Do not ignore shivering. It’s an important first sign that the body is losing heat. Persistent shivering is a signal to return indoors.

AVOID FROSTBITE AND HYPOTHERMIA
When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Prolonged exposure to cold will eventually use up your body’s stored energy. The result is hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it is happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.

Hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat, or submersion in cold water.

Frostbite is an injury to the body that is caused by freezing. Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and color in affected areas. It most often affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes. Frostbite can permanently damage the body, and severe cases can lead to amputation. The risk of frostbite is increased in people with reduced blood circulation and among people who are not dressed properly for extremely cold temperatures.

AVOID EXERTION
Cold weather puts an extra strain on the heart. If you have heart disease or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s advice about shoveling snow or performing other hard work in the cold. Otherwise, if you have to do heavy outdoor chores, dress warmly and work slowly. Remember, your body is already working hard just to stay warm, so don’t overdo it.

UNDERSTAND WIND CHILL
The Wind Chill index is the temperature your body feels when the air temperature is combined with the wind speed. It is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by the effects of wind and cold. As the speed of the wind increases, it can carry heat away from your body much more quickly, causing skin temperature to drop. When there are high winds, serious weather-related health problems are more likely, even when temperatures are only cool.

AVOID ICE
Walking on ice is extremely dangerous. Many cold-weather injuries result from falls on ice-covered sidewalks, steps, driveways, and porches. Keep your steps and walkways as free of ice as possible by using rock salt or another chemical de-icing compound. Sand may also be used on walkways to reduce the risk of slipping.

snow war

BE SAFE DURING RECREATION
Notify friends and family where you will be before you go hiking, camping, or skiing. Do not leave areas of the skin exposed to the cold. Avoid perspiring or becoming overtired. Be prepared to take emergency shelter. Pack dry clothing, a two-wave radio, waterproof matches and paraffin fire starters with you. Do not use alcohol and other mood altering substances, and avoid caffeinated beverages. Avoid walking on ice or getting wet. Carefully watch for signs of cold-weather health problems.

BE CAUTIOUS ABOUT TRAVEL
• Listen for radio or television reports of travel advisories issued by the National Weather Service.
• Do not travel in low visibility conditions.
• Avoid traveling on ice-covered roads, overpasses, and bridges if at all possible.
• If you must travel by car, use tire chains and take a mobile phone with you.
• If you must travel, let someone know your destination and when you expect to arrive. Ask them to notify authorities if you are late.
• Check and restock the winter emergency supplies in your car before you leave.
• Never pour water on your windshield to remove ice or snow; shattering may occur.
• Don’t rely on a car to provide sufficient heat; the car may break down.
• Always carry additional warm clothing appropriate for the winter conditions.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU GET STRANDED
Staying in your vehicle when stranded is often the safest choice if winter storms create poor visibility or if roadways are ice covered. These steps will increase your safety when stranded:
• Tie a brightly colored cloth to the antenna as a signal to rescuers and raise the hood of the car (if it is not snowing).
• Move anything you need from the trunk into the passenger area.
• Wrap your entire body, including your head, in extra clothing, blankets, or newspapers.
• Stay awake. You will be less vulnerable to cold-related health problems.
• Run the motor (and heater) for about 10 minutes per hour, opening one window slightly to let in air. Make sure that snow is not blocking the exhaust pipe—this will reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
• As you sit, keep moving your arms and legs to improve your circulation and stay warmer.
• Do not eat unmelted snow because it will lower your body temperature.
• Huddle with other people for warmth.

For more information about winter safety visit: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/index.asp

For more PTandMe cold weather safety tips to keep you out of harm’s way this winter check the articles below!

snow shoveling safety PTandMe   Winter Safety PTandMe

COVID Recovery for healthy individuals

Introducing REHAB-19

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REHAB-19 COVID Recovery for healthy individuals

It’s not uncommon for patients that experience a milder form of COVID-19 to experience longer-lasting symptoms.  To help patients combat these lasting physical ailments we have created a Rehab-19 Program designed specifically to restore energy for healthy active bodies.  If you have recovered from COVID-19 and you’re not quite feeling like yourself yet, our licensed team of physical therapists can help get you the rest of the way.

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 Some impairments that can last several weeks or months after COVID include:

  • Decreased lung capacity
  • Decreased strength
  • Decreased balance, mobility, and difficulty walking
  • Decreased endurance
  • Abnormal breathing patterns
  • Muscle aches and pain
  • Musculoskeletal pains from coughing/bed rest
  • Chronic fatigue

To help patients overcome these obstacles, our clinicians will provide patients with a comprehensive evaluation to develop an individualized treatment plan to overcome impairments. Once your evaluation is complete, you will begin to work on your personalized reconditioning program.  Both in-clinic and virtual appointments through Telehealth are available for this treatment plan.

The types of strategies that may be included in your REHAB-19 recovery program may include:

By choosing to go to physical therapy for a REHAB-19 program you will be back to your normal energy levels in no time. Our clinicians are experts at helping patients get back to their best selves.  The benefits of physical therapy after COVID-19 include:

  • Improve cardiopulmonary endurance/stamina
  • Improve balance and mobility
  • Return to work, sports, hobbies, and normal activities
  • Restore flexibility and strength
  • Improve breathing mechanics

Rehabilitation programs for patients that have spent time in the ICU are also available. If you are having trouble getting back to your former activity levels, or simply don’t quite feel like yourself, we’re here to help!

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts This February

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are four times more likely to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

According to the Office of Disease Prevention you can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease.

To lower your risk you can:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.
The American Heart Association also has some great resources on their website including tips to stay active, and how to make every move count!

If you need help finding exercises and activities that fit your lifestyle and abilities talk to your physical therapist. PT’s specialize in the science of movement, so who better to ask! If you don’t have a physical therapist make sure you check out our PT finder and get started on your path to a healthy heart this February!

PT News PTandMe

PT News December 2020

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November & December 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

blood clots while traveling

1. Blood Clots: Don’t Bring Them on Your Holiday Trip

Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The coming holidays and winter breaks mean traveling for many people. But spending more than four hours in a car, bus, train or plane leaves you at moderate risk for blood clots in your legs caused by a lack of circulation. These can sometimes break free and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism. The longer you are immobile, the greater your risk of developing a blood clot.  Read more

 

Physical Therapy for Cancer Patients

2. How Physical Therapy Can Benefit Cancer Patients

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Idaho. 

When faced with cancer, having the right medical and support team becomes exponentially more critical. Oncology teams skillfully lead the way in managing a myriad of symptoms and complications that arise. In conjunction with oncology teams, physical therapy is an integral part of healthcare as they help patients regain their functional strength and balance. Physical therapists are serviceable in managing edema and a multitude of other cancer-related dysfunctions in addition. Read more

 

Physical Therapy

3. Are You Missing Out on Free Physical Therapy?

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Have you met your annual insurance deductible? If you have, it’s a great time to come in to see your physical therapist! Many find they can access physical therapy at low or no cost after their deductible has been met. Most deductibles reset on January 1st, so NOW is the time to take advantage of your access to physical therapy.   Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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physical therapy telehealth

Now Providing Online Physical & Occupational Therapy Care

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Our partnering clinics are now providing physical and/or occupational therapy care!

There are now two ways to help patients recover from injury:

  • In Person:We are still open and welcoming patients to receive the care they need in our clinic. Click here for more information about the precautions we are taking in the clinics to keep you safe.
  • Online Through Telehealth: Our partnering therapists can still complete a visit for patients that are unable to make it into the clinic.  They will use both VIDEO and AUDIO so that they can have two way communication during these physical and/or occupational therapy visits.

In order to make your telehealth appointment a success, here are the things you will need access to: 

  • Internet access
  • A device with a camera (computer, phone, tablet) that has access to email
  • Space to exercise

online physical therapy

For more information about online physical and occupational therapy services please contact your clinic directly.

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*Not all locations may be set-up for online appointments. 

reducing holiday stress

Jingled Nerves, Jingled Nerves, Jingled All The Way: Reducing Holiday Stress

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reducing holiday stress

Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed with to-do lists. This year find ways to enjoy yourself and get rid of the stress that’s keeping you up at night with our quick tips! Reducing holiday stress is the key to enjoying the holidays – so what are you waiting for? We have some great ideas!

Plan Ahead and Prioritize
Sit down with your family and come up with a list of ideas on how you would like to spend the holidays. Decide which ideas would be the most stressful in terms of cost, time, and energy and cross them off your list.

Choose the things that you enjoy and can accomplish realistically. Prioritize the events that matter most to you and your family, and set a budget.

Clarify Your Values
Reflect on the way you spend the holidays. What is most important to you—spending more money on your loved ones or spending more time with them? Do you believe the idea that “love-equals-money”? Are you driven by perfectionism and competitive gift? Do you take the time to experience joy and the true meaning of the season? What other ways could you show your love? Do you enjoy shopping or is it a hassle each year? Is gift giving really meaningful or do you end up with lots of clutter and gifts that you do not really need? What, if anything, would you like to change about how you celebrate the holidays? Answering these and other questions can help to clarify your values for the holiday season, and result in a much more relaxed and meaningful time.

Simplify
Here are some tips to simplify your holiday challenges:
• If you dislike traffic jams, crowded shopping malls and parking lots, and waiting in long lines, try shopping online.
• Plan to finish all of your gift shopping well in advance of the holidays.
• Wrap your presents early.
• Cut back on your baking. Do not bake 10 different types of cookies. Make your goodies ahead of time and freeze them so you will have less to do during busy times. If you are looking for dessert variety, try organizing a cookie exchange with your family and friends.
• Take care of several errands in one trip, rather than making multiple trips.
• Consider drawing names rather than exchanging gifts with all your family members and friends.
• Limit the number of social events you host or attend.
• Delegate tasks to family members. Do not feel that you must be responsible for everything.

Take Care of Your Health
You will be at your best and more resistant to stress and possible infection if you take good care of your health. Here are some suggestions:
• Get plenty of sleep each night (at least 8 hours).
• Exercise regularly.
• Eat a well-balanced diet. It is okay to have some goodies at a party, but a few extra calories here and there can add up to holiday weight gain—slowing you down.
• Limit alcohol intake. Alcohol depresses the nervous system and can cause fatigue and sleep disturbances.
• Take time to unwind. Take a hot bath or find a quiet place to enjoy some time alone each day. Even a few minutes can make a difference.
• Stick to your healthy routine as much as possible.

time Xmas

Don’t Forget the Joy
Try to celebrate the holidays in new and creative ways. Remember that you are not a “human doing” but a human being! Enjoy the uniqueness of each special person in your life and enjoy the time you can spend just being together. Seek out the simple joys of the holiday season with your friends and family. Taking a walk around the neighborhood to look at holiday decorations, singing carols, playing games, or just talking are easy and healthy ways to positively experience the holidays.

Adjust Your Expectations
We get a lot of messages about how things should be at the holidays. We have been programmed to believe that the holidays are a time of great joy, love, and togetherness. The truth is that many people may be having a hard time during the holidays, whether they are grieving the loss of a loved one, having financial problems, or experiencing difficulty with their family relationships. Sadness is common during this time of year, which is often referred to as “holiday blues.”

One way to reduce stress and the “holiday blues” is to keep your expectations realistic. Things will likely not be perfect, no matter how hard you try. There may be disappointments, arguments, and frustrations, in addition to excitement and joy. Try to go with the flow, allowing for inevitable delays and setbacks. Do not have the expectation of perfection from yourself, as well as from others around you.

If you are grieving a loss or feeling sad and lonely, accept these feelings. Do not feel guilty about your sadness or try to force yourself to be happy just because it is the holiday season. If this is a difficult time for you, adopt a nurturing attitude toward yourself. Do not be afraid to seek support from family, friends, or a counselor. If the holidays are a lonely time for you, find ways to increase your social support or consider volunteering your services to those in need. Helping others in need is a wonderful way to celebrate the message of the holiday season, as well as an excellent way to help you feel better.

by Amy Scholten, MPH

En Español

RESOURCES:
The American Institute of Stress
http://www.stress.org/

American Psychological Association
http://www.psych.org/

123 Ways to Reduce Stress and Relax – Health Grinder
https://healthgrinder.com/ways-to-reduce-stress/ 

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada
http://www.anxietycanada.ca/

Canadian Mental Health Association
http://www.cmha.ca/bins/index.asp

REFERENCES:
North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension website. Available at: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Sleep, sleepiness, and alcohol use. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website. Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh25-2/101-109.htm.

University of Maryland website. Available at: http://www.umm.edu. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Weil Cornell psychiatrist offers advice for reducing holiday stress. Cornell University website. Available at: http://www.med.cornell.edu/. Accessed June 10, 2007

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

ladder safety

Ladder Safety

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ladder safety

As we start to put up our holiday decorations, it’s important to remember that safety comes first.
We’ve collected a few tips on proper ladder safety usage to help you stay safe this holiday season!

LadderSafety

  • If you feel tired or dizzy or are prone to losing your balance, stay off the ladder.
  • Wear clean slip-resistant shoes. Shoes with leather soles are not ideal for ladder use as they are not considered sufficiently slip-resistant.
  • When the ladder is set-up for use, it should be placed on firm level ground and without any type of slippery condition present at either the base or top support points.
  • Ladders should not be placed in front of closed doors that can open toward the ladder. The door should be blocked open, locked, or guarded.
  • Before using a ladder, inspect it to confirm it is in good working condition.
  • Ladders with loose or missing parts should not be used.
  • Rickety ladders that sway or lean to the side should not be used.
  • Make sure you’re using the right size ladder for the job.
  • The length of the ladder should be sufficient so that the climber does not have to stand on the top rung or step.
  • Only one person at a time should be on a ladder unless the ladder is specifically designed for more than one climber (such as a Trestle Ladder).
  • Never jump or slide down from a ladder or climb more than one rung/step at a time.

Ladders can be extremely hazardous when they aren’t used properly, so please take advantage of the safety precautions above. If you find yourself in pain, please come see us. We can help get rid of your pain and back to the holiday traditions and events that you look forward to. It’s our job to make sure you feel great and ready to celebrate!

Looking for a physical therapist to help you recover from a ladder injury?

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More information about ladder safety can be found in our Newsletter

Avoiding Ladder Hazards

Looking for more holiday survival tips? We have them here for you!

  Lifting Safety Tips PTandMe  elf injuries physical therapy PTandMe

 

 

PT News PTandMe

PT News November 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout October & November 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Holiday Home Exercise Program

1. 15 Minute Holiday Home Exercise Program

Created by Mishock Physical Therapy with 7 Convenient locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties.

The goal of the Mishock Physical Therapy Holiday Home Exercise program is to promote the development of the individual’s ability to become strong in fundamental movement patterns (relative maximum strength) that are critical to improving function and preventing injury. The scientifically based program trains the body’s major muscle groups by focusing on the core, upper, and lower body strength through fundamental movement patterns. Read more

 

Stretching

2. 9 Ways Stretching Can Improve your Health and Wellness

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Ohio. 

Is stretching part of your daily life? If not, it should be. Stretching is a great way to start your day and it comes with a wide range of benefits. Don’t know where to start? Don’t fret! Our licensed physical therapists can help you create a stretching plan that will work best for you. To find out more about how daily stretches and improve your quality of life! Read more

 

breast cancer physical therapy

3. Recovery During and After Cancer Treatment: A Therapist’s Role

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group in Bend, OR, and surrounding areas.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and it also is National Physical Therapy Month. As a physical therapist and certified lymphedema therapist, I am very passionate about working with patients during their journey with breast cancer.   Physical therapists (and occupational therapists) play an important role in the recovery after breast cancer treatments.  These treatments can include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.  Patients can experience side effects from treatments that can impact their daily lives.  Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Physical Therapy for Post Intensive Care Syndrome

Physical Therapy for Post Intensive Care Syndrome

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Physical Therapy for Post Intensive Care Syndrome

In regards to COVID, as a country, we have been uniquely focused on infection and survival rates. States and school districts have set up dashboards to help keep everyone informed as much as possible. News sources are still providing regular updates. Very little, however, is said about the quality of life that COVID patients have if they spent prolonged periods in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Did you know that around 70% of ICU patients that are released suffer from neuromuscular deficits and weakness? These are all symptoms of Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS).  PICS is described by the Cleveland Clinic, as a collection of physical, mental, and emotional symptoms that continue to persist after a patient leaves the ICU.

Physical complications include impairments in: 

  • Muscle strength
  • Mobility
  • Pulmonary function
  • Pain 
  • Gait speed
  • Balance
  • Activities of Daily Living (ADL)

As physical and occupational therapists, we are uniquely prepared to help patients who have required a hospital stay, admission to the ICU, and often ventilation during their COVID-19 treatment. 

What to Expect During Physical Therapy for Post Intensive Care Syndrome 

Patient interview screening questions for COVID will help your team identify yellow flags, which may indicate the patient is at risk for additional physical limitations, cognitive deficits, and biopsychosocial aftermath. Physical and occupational therapists can combat these issues by providing individualized treatments programs that may include: 

  • A progressive strengthening exercise program 
  • Functional activities/ADL training 
  • ROM, flexibility exercises, manual therapy techniques 
  • A graded aerobic conditioning program 
  • Gait training program
  • Pain Neuroscience Education (PNE) including relaxation training, ADL pacing, sleep hygiene
  • Neuromuscular re-education/proprioceptive training
  • Patient education & aftercare wellness programs

Physical Therapy for Post Intensive Care Syndrome can help post-COVID patients get back into their daily routines and activities. Patients that have trouble or feel uncomfortable going into the clinic have the option to receive care virtually through Telehealth. As caregivers, the main goal is to help patients recover in the setting that best suits their needs. If you need help, please don’t hesitate to reach out to one of our licensed physical therapists.

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Top 8 Signs You Can Benefit from Outpatient Physical Therapy

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benefit from outpatient physical therapy

We are so excited to celebrate Physical Therapy Month with you! Every October we get the opportunity to share what we’re all about. Without further ado, let’s get started on our Top 8 signs you could benefit from outpatient physical therapy. Some of these may be surprising…

#1 You Require Pain Medications

Physical Therapy is an Opioid Alternative

Physical Therapy is a safe, non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries. Instead of masking symptoms, we get right to the source and help you heal. Manage pain safely with physical therapy instead of relying solely on opioids or other pain medications.

#2 You’re In Pain

Physical Therapy Treats Pain

If you are experiencing pain, we can help you treat the cause and not just the symptoms. In fact, physical therapists spend most of their careers working with patients to help them get rid of their pain so that they can do the things they enjoy most. If you have consistent pain and have been nursing an injury for weeks before seeking help from a medical professional, your body may have already begun to heal; and not always the way we would like it to. By going to physical therapy first, you can help cut down the time off work, off of sports, and promote healing much faster.

#3 Pre & Post Operative Recovery

Pre & Post-surgical rehabilitation helps patients regain their mobility after going through an operation. A post-op recovery plan typically includes:

  • Pain reduction
  • Exercises and stretches to improve strength, flexibility, and endurance
  • Balance and/or gait training
  • Patient education and self-care training

#4 Nagging Symptoms

Untreated, a nagging pain can become chronic pain. Overuse and Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI) from work or sports can potentially lead to injury and sometimes surgery. These nagging pains are a warning from your body that you need help. Physical therapists can work with you to reduce your pain and prevent injuries from happening. By going through movement training, learning to take breaks when necessary, and developing stretch and exercise routines, we can get rid of that pain and keep you in your sport or workplace.

#5 Balance Issues

You may recall from Falls Prevention Week last month, that fall death rates have increased by 30% since 2007. For the most part, falls are preventable, and physical therapists are uniquely poised on the front lines in the battle against falls.

  • Have you fallen in the past year?
  • Do you feel unsteady when standing or walking?
  • Are you worried about falling?

If you answered yes to any of the above you could benefit from a fall prevention program to improve your strength, balance, & gait.

#6 Have Trouble Sleeping

Who knew physical therapists had so many skills up their sleeves?  Sleeping is one of the most important things that we can do for our bodies. Our bodies utilize this time for recovery and sleeping in a position that causes pain can prevent the body from recovering. Therefore, finding an appropriate sleeping position that results in your body feeling at ease is very important. In fact, part of rehabilitation is educating patients on how to sleep in a position that won’t aggravate the injury as they heal.

#7 Uncontrolled Descent

As physical therapists, we spend a good bit of time working with patients that suffer from muscle weakness. Whether it be from old age, prolonged bed-rest, or a neurological disorder, we can help.  If you or someone you know has trouble remaining upright or is unable to control their descent from a standing to a sitting position we can create a strengthening program designed specifically for their needs and ability levels.

#8 Limited Activities of Daily Living

Physical Therapy ADL

Last but certainly not least, we help people achieve their movement goals! If you find yourself unable to carry the laundry basket down the hall, wash the car, or basically any of the activities that you do on a daily basis, we’re here for that. Helping people reach their goals is our passion and nothing makes us happier than seeing you get back to the lifestyle you love most.

From infants to seniors, physical therapists are working hard each day to help the people of their communities be at their best. We hope you enjoyed our Top 08 signs that could benefit from outpatient physical therapy. Maybe you have already been treated for one of them. If you believe that you need physical therapy you can easily find a physical therapist near you and get started today. With in-person and virtual options available through Telehealth, there has never been a better time to get started on your care.

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