Category Archives: General Information

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PT News April 2022

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout April 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Fix Bad Posture

1. Picture Perfect Posture

Written by Carolina Physical Therapy with locations throughout South Carolina.

Over the course of my career as a Physical Therapist, one of the biggest issues I see with patients is poor postural habits being practiced on a daily basis. Most of this can be due to the fact that individuals are constantly looking down at their phones, hunching over their desks at work, and sitting on their couches improperly.  Read more

 

Shedding Winter Weight

2. Shed the Winter Weight

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Northern Virginia.

Are you struggling to find the motivation to get back on your workout program and shed the winter weight? You’re not alone! Many of us find ourselves with unwanted pounds after long winter months filled with holiday parties and yummy foods. But worry not: we have ideas for ALL levels of athletes, from walking to running and cross-training.  Read more

 

Low Back Pain Physical Therapy

3. Primary Care Low Back Guidelines

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Idaho.

The cost for low back pain treatment to patients per year approximates $134 Billion for combined insurance and out-of-pocket costs. This does not include the expense of missed workdays or missed opportunities that individuals encounter when managing low back pain. For this reason, improvements in the treatment approach for non-specific low back pain are important.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News April 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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PT News February/March 2022

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout February and March 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Worker’s Compensation: What Is A Job Analysis?

Written by ARC Physical Therapy+ with locations throughout  Missouri, Kansas, and Iowa.

A functional job analysis is the first and most critical step of a comprehensive injury management program. The job analysis is the cornerstone for determining the essential functions of the position and associated physical demands required as well as for developing testing to determine the physical capabilities of an employee.  Read more

 

physical therapy for headaches

2. Physical Therapy Tackles Cervicogenic Headaches Head-On

Written by Jaco Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Oahu, Hawaii.

Are you noticing headaches on one side or the back of your head? Are you feeling worse at the end of your workday or headaches that worsen with computer usage or driving? You may be suffering from cervicogenic headaches. Thankfully, they are treatable with physical therapy!  Read more

 

How to Sleep Better

3. How you sleep matters.

Written by Riverview Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Maine.

How you sleep matters. Are you waking up with lower back discomfort or neck soreness that you didn’t go to bed with? You may be sleeping wrong.

Try sleeping on your back or on one of your sides. Sleeping on your stomach is never advised. Just think about it, would you spend your workday with your head turned 90 degrees to the side for 6-8 hours? Of course not.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News February/March 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Why we Love Physical Therapy

Why We LOVE Physical Therapy!

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Why we Love Physical Therapy

This Valentine’s day we wanted to tell you why we LOVE physical therapy! There are a million reasons, but these really hit close to home.

1. The human body is fascinating

You’ll be hard-pressed to find a machine that works as well or better than the human body. We see people with all kinds of injuries and pain – and for the most part, with a little help from us (okay, sometimes a lot!), the body will heal. The human body has around 640 muscles in 13 major muscle groups, working together to keep you moving. We love diving in to find out where your pain comes from, what caused it, and how we can get everything working smoothly again.

2. We can provide an alternative to surgery

We love that we get to provide an option for patients that might not be ready or are unwilling to try surgical options. Sometimes surgery is needed, and we’ll recommend someone we know and trust, but we love helping people achieve success with non-invasive techniques.

3. We get to make a difference in our patients’ lives

As physical therapists, few things are more rewarding than watching the small victories of our patients as they work towards their ultimate goals. Being a part of those first moments of success, whether it be a few extra degrees of mobility, that first step without pain – whatever the circumstances… those moments are what keep us coming back to the clinic each day. When patients walk through those doors for the first time, we know they are not at their best, but we’re going to work our hardest to get them back and better than ever!

4. We love seeing the impact of our work in the community

It’s hard not to smile when you see a former patient make the team without red-shirting the season. Or when we hear that one of our seniors is independent and expecting visits from their grandkids. Health is something a lot of us take for granted until we don’t have it. Seeing our patients active, happy, healthy, and out in the community is one of our favorite things.

We LOVE our physical therapy family, and we’re not alone.

Our best advocates happen to be current and former patients. Check out the great things they are saying about our PTandMe physical therapy family.  If you’ve been through a rehabilitation program, please consider leaving feedback for your clinic – It really does make a difference.

Reputation Reviews

To find a physical therapy clinic near you click the button below.

physical therapy near meWhy we Love Physical Therapy

Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts This February

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are four times more likely to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

According to the Office of Disease Prevention you can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease.

To lower your risk you can:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.
The American Heart Association also has some great resources on their website including tips to stay active, and how to make every move count!

If you need help finding exercises and activities that fit your lifestyle and abilities talk to your physical therapist. PT’s specialize in the science of movement, so who better to ask! If you don’t have a physical therapist make sure you check out our PT finder and get started on your path to a healthy heart this February!

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PT News January 2022

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout January 2022. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

physical therapy after a car accident

1. Physical Therapy gets Patient Walking Again after Serious Accident

Written by Ability Rehabilitation with multiple locations throughout  Central, FL.

In the US, 30 million children, and teens participate in organized sports with more than 4 million injuries each year. The majority of these injuries occur as sprains and strains of the upper and lower extremity. (Hopkinsmedicine.org) Many of these injuries are preventable with proper exercise training, which ultimately reduces health care costs and minimizes lost playing time keeping the athlete on the field or court.  Read more

 

2. Get Moving Again with these Helpful Tips

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations in the Columbus, Ohio area.

Did you know that 80 percent of the U.S. population falls short of the Physical Activity Guidelines recommended by the Department of Health and Human Services? Millions of Americans are risking serious health consequences simply because they do too much sitting and not enough moving around. Read more

 

Pelvic Health for Men

3. Is Pelvic Rehab Just for Women?

Written by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, MI. 

Pelvic floor physical therapy has long been identified as “Women’s Health.” But the fact remains that everyone is in possession of a pelvic floor. Men can experience pelvic floor dysfunction or pelvic pain for a multitude of reasons that can successfully be treated with physical therapy. Male pelvic floor dysfunction has the same definition as female. The pelvic floor is unable to correctly relax and coordinate muscle use, noting issues with urination, bowel movements, pain, or sexual dysfunction.  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News January 2022 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Physical Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

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Physical Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

If you are looking for better ways to manage your Type 2 Diabetes or are simply trying to get ahead of it by preventing it, read on because we may have some tips for you!

Just under half a billion people are currently living with diabetes worldwide. That number is projected to increase by 25% in 2030 and 51% in 2045. Diabetes is a worldwide health problem characterized by the body’s inability to break down sugar due to the inefficiency of the hormone insulin, which can lead to several complications, including the disproportionate impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on people with this condition. Diabetes can affect people of all ages and can be associated with muscle weakness, decreased endurance, balance problems, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and musculoskeletal impairments. “Up to 80% of patients referred for outpatient physical therapy have diabetes or are at risk for diabetes, providing an opportunity for us as physical therapists to intervene.” – JOSPT

Diabetes can affect a person’s ability to move easily due to issues associated with joint mobility limitation and tissue changes, resulting in thicker and stiffer collagen tissues in tendons, skin, and discs, increasing a person’s risk for injury.

One of the best ways physical therapists help patients combat all these underlying issues is, you guessed right, Exercise!

Researchers in the United Kingdom found that exercise reduces your risk of developing the disease by almost 25 percent. So how much exercise is enough? The quantity of exercise is important because the positive effects on blood sugar drop 72 hours after you’ve finished your activity. This means that instead of trying to get your exercise in once a week — such as on the weekend — you should spread out your activities throughout the week. The American Diabetes Association recommends 150 minutes of exercise per week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. However, those with peripheral neuropathy, nerve damage commonly caused by diabetes, shouldn’t perform any weight-bearing activities.

The best exercise program for those with type 2 diabetes should include a combination of aerobic, resistance, and endurance training. We can also provide patients with a fall prevention program designed to increase independence with functional activities, functional mobility, and safety awareness while decreasing fall risk.

Here are some of the exercises recommended during physical therapy for Type 2 Diabetes:

  • Walking – The only thing necessary to complete this activity is a good pair of shoes and a trail, path, or sidewalk. Taking a brisk walk 3 to 5 times a week will put you on your way to meeting the recommended exercise recommendation goals.
  • Stationary Bicycling – This is a low-impact exercise that can help strengthen muscles, and limit joint pain.
  • Swimming – This is another activity that puts very little strain on the body’s joints but gives you a whole-body workout at the same time.
  • Aerobic dance – Zumba is an example of aerobic dance that encourages you to move around freely! Not only will this exercise your body, but it will give you a chance to connect with others that are looking to improve their health in similar ways to you.
  • Resistance band exercisesUsing resistance bands will allow you to train in a very different way than usual. Although, to use them properly, consulting with a physical therapist is a good idea. Your therapist can help you learn the safest ways to use the bands. They can also assist you with appropriate exercises for your health and fitness level.
  • YogaYoga can improve flexibility & joint health. It can provide a mental boost as well.

Bonus Tips for Safe Exercise

Exercise should be a safe, enjoyable, and positive experience. Here are some exercise tips for individuals with diabetes.

  • Check Your Blood SugarIt’s important to check your blood sugar every 30 minutes during exercise, and four hours afterward to make sure that you’re maintaining proper blood sugar levels.
  • Check Your Feet/Shoes – People with this condition are at risk for diabetic neuropathy, which is a type of nerve damage that can mostly occur in the legs and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can lead to serious complications, including ulcers, infection, and bone & joint pain. Make sure to wear clean socks and shoes that fit you well. Look inside your shoes before wearing them to make sure there is nothing in them that might hurt you or make you feel uncomfortable. Always examine your feet before and after activity for blisters, redness, or other signs of irritation.
  • Hydration and Snacks – Staying hydrated is essential to avoid any injury. It is also important to have some fast-acting sugary food available in the event of hypoglycemia or low blood sugar levels. This is critical for individuals who are on insulin and have type 1 diabetes.
  • Warm-Up/Cool Down – We encourage you to warm up for 5 minutes before starting to exercise and cool down for 5 minutes in the end. If you begin to feel uncomfortable, you should rest for a few minutes and see how you feel. Use the “talk test” to make sure you are not pushing yourself too hard. If you become short of breath and you can’t talk, then slow down. As your fitness level improves over time, you’ll be able to exercise at a higher intensity and chat with others while having fun exercising.

Physical therapy for Type 2 diabetes can help patients address weakness, balance problems, lack of activity, and more. As mentioned before, skipping regular physical activity for more than two days in a row can lead to glucose intolerance and insulin sensitivity, so it is important that you maintain your physical therapy appointments and follow our home exercise instructions. We can help you manage your diabetes together and help you live a happy healthy life.

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PT News PTandMe

PT News December 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Core Strength Improve Balance

1. Injury Prevention and Durability: The Significance of the “Core”

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout  Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties.

In the US, 30 million children, and teens participate in organized sports with more than 4 million injuries each year. The majority of these injuries occur as sprains and strains of the upper and lower extremity. (Hopkinsmedicine.org) Many of these injuries are preventable with proper exercise training, which ultimately reduces health care costs and minimizes lost playing time keeping the athlete on the field or court.  Read more

 

Boxing Physical Therapy

2. Boxing: Making an Impact in Physical Therapy

Written by Intermountain Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations in Caldwell, Nampa, and Meridian, ID

Boxing is a full-body fitness and rehabilitation strategy that, in addition to general fitness, can be applied to a variety of conditions seen and treated by Physical Therapists and Physical Therapy Assistants.  Boxing has health applications for both neurologic and pathologic conditions, with significant research focusing on four common conditions addressed by physical therapy. Read more

 

3. The McKenzie Method

Written by ARC Physical Therapy+, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater Kansas City. 

“The most compelling part of the McKenzie Method is that it allows the patient to take a more active role in managing their pain,” Megan Westman, DPT, Certified MDT, explains. “It provides the patient’s tools to prevent further pain as well as improve centralization and reduction of symptoms in between each PT visit.”…  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News December 2021 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Physical Therapy Visit

Add Physical Therapy To Your 2022 Health Plan

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Physical Therapy Visit

The new year is upon us and we can’t wait to see what surprises 2022 has in store. One surprise no one wants is pain and injury. Avoid this by getting scheduling an appointment with your physical therapist to have your musculoskeletal system checked. As physical therapists, we are uniquely qualified to evaluate physical changes in your body that could potentially lead to pain or injury. By making a routine physical therapy visit, we can help patients prevent issues in the future. You know they say, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

So who can benefit the most from these visits? 

1. Former Patients:

If you have been discharged from physical therapy in the last 6 months or longer, this is a great time to get a follow-up. We can evaluate your previous injury and see if there are any signs of recurrence, go over your HEP to see if it needs to be updated to fit your current needs and check any other ailments that may be bothering you.

2. Athletes:

We work with athletes to help them prevent injuries in their sports before they occur. By going to physical therapy, we can evaluate the demands of your sport, compare that to your current physical capabilities, and create an exercise plan tailored to specific muscle groups. We can also work with teams to develop warm-up and exercise routines designed to improve performance.

3. Seniors over 65:

Seniors over the age of 65 can find themselves losing vision, strength, and perhaps, most importantly, balance. By going to physical therapy for a balance screening, we can identify your risk of falls and prevent them before they happen. The CDC says that 25% of people ages 65 and older fall each year. By going through a fall prevention program, we can help bring that statistic down.

4. Patients Considering Surgery:

Physical therapists work to reduce pain and heal injuries. It works so well in fact that in many cases it has been proven to remove or reduce the need for surgery.  If you’re looking for a conservative plan of care, you’ve come to the right place.  In the event that surgery is needed, we also provide pre-op appointments to help make recovery easier and safer.

We want to help you make this the best year ever by preventing major injuries or pain. We take your safety seriously. We are following all local and CDC guidelines to keep you safe. In-clinic and virtual appointments are available in many of our locations.  Find the clinic nearest you and get your physical therapy visit scheduled!

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reducing holiday stress

Jingled Nerves, Jingled Nerves, Jingled All The Way: Reducing Holiday Stress

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reducing holiday stress

Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed with to-do lists. This year find ways to enjoy yourself and get rid of the stress that’s keeping you up at night with our quick tips! Reducing holiday stress is the key to enjoying the holidays – so what are you waiting for? We have some great ideas!

Plan Ahead and Prioritize
Sit down with your family and come up with a list of ideas on how you would like to spend the holidays. Decide which ideas would be the most stressful in terms of cost, time, and energy and cross them off your list.

Choose the things that you enjoy and can accomplish realistically. Prioritize the events that matter most to you and your family, and set a budget.

Clarify Your Values
Reflect on the way you spend the holidays. What is most important to you—spending more money on your loved ones or spending more time with them? Do you believe the idea that “love-equals-money”? Are you driven by perfectionism and competitive gift? Do you take the time to experience joy and the true meaning of the season? What other ways could you show your love? Do you enjoy shopping or is it a hassle each year? Is gift giving really meaningful or do you end up with lots of clutter and gifts that you do not really need? What, if anything, would you like to change about how you celebrate the holidays? Answering these and other questions can help to clarify your values for the holiday season, and result in a much more relaxed and meaningful time.

Simplify
Here are some tips to simplify your holiday challenges:
• If you dislike traffic jams, crowded shopping malls and parking lots, and waiting in long lines, try shopping online.
• Plan to finish all of your gift shopping well in advance of the holidays.
• Wrap your presents early.
• Cut back on your baking. Do not bake 10 different types of cookies. Make your goodies ahead of time and freeze them so you will have less to do during busy times. If you are looking for dessert variety, try organizing a cookie exchange with your family and friends.
• Take care of several errands in one trip, rather than making multiple trips.
• Consider drawing names rather than exchanging gifts with all your family members and friends.
• Limit the number of social events you host or attend.
• Delegate tasks to family members. Do not feel that you must be responsible for everything.

Take Care of Your Health
You will be at your best and more resistant to stress and possible infection if you take good care of your health. Here are some suggestions:
• Get plenty of sleep each night (at least 8 hours).
• Exercise regularly.
• Eat a well-balanced diet. It is okay to have some goodies at a party, but a few extra calories here and there can add up to holiday weight gain—slowing you down.
• Limit alcohol intake. Alcohol depresses the nervous system and can cause fatigue and sleep disturbances.
• Take time to unwind. Take a hot bath or find a quiet place to enjoy some time alone each day. Even a few minutes can make a difference.
• Stick to your healthy routine as much as possible.

time Xmas

Don’t Forget the Joy
Try to celebrate the holidays in new and creative ways. Remember that you are not a “human doing” but a human being! Enjoy the uniqueness of each special person in your life and enjoy the time you can spend just being together. Seek out the simple joys of the holiday season with your friends and family. Taking a walk around the neighborhood to look at holiday decorations, singing carols, playing games, or just talking are easy and healthy ways to positively experience the holidays.

Adjust Your Expectations
We get a lot of messages about how things should be at the holidays. We have been programmed to believe that the holidays are a time of great joy, love, and togetherness. The truth is that many people may be having a hard time during the holidays, whether they are grieving the loss of a loved one, having financial problems, or experiencing difficulty with their family relationships. Sadness is common during this time of year, which is often referred to as “holiday blues.”

One way to reduce stress and the “holiday blues” is to keep your expectations realistic. Things will likely not be perfect, no matter how hard you try. There may be disappointments, arguments, and frustrations, in addition to excitement and joy. Try to go with the flow, allowing for inevitable delays and setbacks. Do not have the expectation of perfection from yourself, as well as from others around you.

If you are grieving a loss or feeling sad and lonely, accept these feelings. Do not feel guilty about your sadness or try to force yourself to be happy just because it is the holiday season. If this is a difficult time for you, adopt a nurturing attitude toward yourself. Do not be afraid to seek support from family, friends, or a counselor. If the holidays are a lonely time for you, find ways to increase your social support or consider volunteering your services to those in need. Helping others in need is a wonderful way to celebrate the message of the holiday season, as well as an excellent way to help you feel better.

by Amy Scholten, MPH

RESOURCES:
The American Institute of Stress
http://www.stress.org/

American Psychological Association
http://www.psych.org/

How to Live with Anxiety
https://www.buzzrx.com/blog/how-to-live-with-anxiety 

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada
http://www.anxietycanada.ca/

Canadian Mental Health Association
http://www.cmha.ca/bins/index.asp

REFERENCES:
North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension website. Available at: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Sleep, sleepiness, and alcohol use. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website. Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh25-2/101-109.htm.

University of Maryland website. Available at: http://www.umm.edu. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Weil Cornell psychiatrist offers advice for reducing holiday stress. Cornell University website. Available at: http://www.med.cornell.edu/. Accessed June 10, 2007

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

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PT News November 2021

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November 2021. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy-based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Healthy Snacks While Traveling

1. 15 Healthy Travel Snacks

Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations in Northern, VA.

Packing healthy travel snacks may sound like a silly thing to do. After all, there are plenty of food options at just about every rest area or airport. However, there are many reasons to consider packing at least a few healthy travel snacks on your next trip.  Read more

 

Frozen Shoulder Physical Therapy

2. Don’t Miss Out on Free Physical Therapy

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout Greater San Antonio, TX. 

Have you met your annual insurance deductible? If you have, it’s a great time to come in to see your physical therapist! any people find that they can access physical therapy at low or no cost after their deductible has been met. Most deductibles reset on January 1st, so NOW is the time to take advantage of your access to physical therapy. Not sure if your deductible has been met? Read more

 

Choose the right shoe

3. If the Shoe Fits

Written by Physical Therapy Plus, an outpatient physical therapy group with 3 locations in New Jersey

All too often the topic of footwear comes up in our clinic, even if the person isn’t there for a foot problem. The shoes you choose to spend your day in will greatly impact all areas of your body including your knees, hips, and spine. Your foot is the first part of your body to absorb the impact of the ground. That being said, it’s best to arm it with the right surface to stabilize against the force of the ground reaction…  Read more

We hope you enjoyed our picks for the PT News November 2021 edition.

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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