Category Archives: General Information

PT News PTandMe

PT News August 2020

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June & July 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Sports Periodization Can Help You Peak and Avoid Overuse Injuries

Written by Physical Therapy Plus with locations in Clinton, Hackettstown, and Washington, NJ.

As unfortunate as it is true, injuries and sports go hand in hand. An average of 8.6 million injuries in sports and recreational activities occur each year, which equates to about 34 injuries for every 1,000 individuals that participate. While some minor injuries might only lead to a short gap in participation, others can end seasons and lead to long-term complications if not rehabilitated properly.  Read more

 

sport specialization

2. Baseball Throwing Injuries

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

Most states have moved away from self-quarantine and are now resuming the “new normal” with COVID-19 in our midst. From March through June, youth and adolescent sports were canceled. Sports organizations are now trying to play catch up by squeezing spring and summer sports into July and August. With this ramp-up in games, we have seen a significant increase in sports-related injuries, especially baseball throwing injuries. Two such injuries are growth plate injuries of the throwing elbow and shoulder.  Read more

 

3. Get Back In The Saddle With Help from a Hand Therapist

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR.

Reaching out your arm to brace for a fall is instinctual. It’s no surprise, then, that some of the most common mountain biking injuries are fractures of the wrist, hands, fingers, and elbows. When a bike’s front tire hits a rock or loose dirt, it can cause the rider to fly off the bike and land on an outstretched arm.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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Why You Shouldn't Put off going to physical therapy

Why You Shouldn’t Put Off Going to Physical Therapy

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Why You Shouldn't Put off going to physical therapy

You were not meant to live in pain. As therapists, we spend our entire careers working to help the people in our communities feel better and get back to the things they enjoy most. We know that living through a pandemic and social distancing won’t take your pain away – that injuries will still happen. Knowing this, we have decided to stay open and provide a safe environment where patients can come and receive care. 

Physical and Occupational Therapy are Essential Services. 

We are here to assist in keeping people healthy; physical and occupational therapists are essential in flattening the curve of the COVID-19 pandemic. We have and continue to play a key role in keeping patients out of physician offices and hospitals. Our goal is to not only free up medical teams needed to treat those impacted by COVID-19 but also limit the exposure of those seeking care for treatment that a physical or occupational therapist can provide. 

What Can I Do if I’m Not Comfortable Going In?

We understand that we are in unprecedented times, and leaving home can be uncomfortable. You may try instead to lessen the pain by putting weight on one side rather than the other, or perhaps changing the way you sit or stand to avoid further discomfort. These slight modifications bring temporary relief but could lead to bigger issues if left unattended.

Luckily we have been able to implement a Telehealth option for those that aren’t quite ready to come into the clinic. This gives patients the opportunity to spend time one-on-one with a licensed therapist. During these virtual visits, our therapists can provide many of the same skilled services we offer in the clinic including an assessment of the patient’s condition, patient education, and progression of exercises to help improve:

  • Strength
  • Range of Motion
  • Posture
  • Neuromuscular Control
  • Patient Safety

What Precautions Are You Taking If I Decide to Visit In Person?

We are following all CDC and local guidelines to keep you safe. A detailed explanation of what we are doing can be found in our Your Health is Our Top Priority blog. 

Common Conditions We are Seeing Right Now

  • Pre & Post Surgical Rehabilitation: If you have recently had surgery, or your surgery has been postponed, we can help to decrease pain and swelling while improving range of motion and strength.
  • Low Back Pain and Sciatica
  • Repetitive Strain Injuries
  • Sports Injury Rehabilitation

If you are in pain, we are here to help. From in-clinic to at-home visits we will do everything we can to get you back on your feet.  We quite literally, have your back!

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PT News PTandMe

PT News July 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June & July 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Now is the Time to Start Physical Therapy

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Berks & Montgomery Counties in PA.

Now is the time to focus on your health and treat the pain that is limiting your function, leading to poor quality of life. This is the perfect time to start physical therapy. We can help!  Read more

 

physical therapy for headaches

2. Physical Therapy for Cervical Headaches

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Central Virginia 

There are multiple types of headaches. Often a simple exam and a few questions can rule in or out cervical headaches as the cause. Very rarely are expensive imaging and testing is needed to achieve a diagnosis. Following an initial evaluation, a physical therapist will have the basis for understanding Read more

 

physical therapy for arthritis

3. Physical Therapy: Treating Arthritis the Safe and Easy Way

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with 6 locations throughout the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Area.

Anyone living with arthritis knows how debilitating it can be. Several people dealing with arthritic aches and pains end up resorting to steroid injections, antirheumatic drugs, or even joint replacement surgery, in order to manage their pain. However, physical therapy itself has proven successful for many arthritis sufferers.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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physical therapy online

Now Providing Online Physical & Occupational Therapy Care

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Our partnering clinics are now providing physical and/or occupational therapy care!

There are now two ways to help patients recover from injury:

  • In Person:We are still open and welcoming patients to receive the care they need in our clinic. Click here for more information about the precautions we are taking in the clinics to keep you safe.
  • Online Through Telehealth: Our partnering therapists can still complete a visit for patients that are unable to make it into the clinic.  They will use both VIDEO and AUDIO so that they can have two way communication during these physical and/or occupational therapy visits.

In order to make your telehealth appointment a success, here are the things you will need access to: 

  • Internet access
  • A device with a camera (computer, phone, tablet) that has access to email
  • Space to exercise

online physical therapy

For more information about online physical and occupational therapy services please contact your clinic directly.

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*Not all locations may be set-up for online appointments. 

Sleep Better Tonight

How to Sleep Better Tonight

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Sleep Better Tonight

THE NECESSITY OF SLEEP

Nutrition and exercise are important for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but sleep is often overlooked. We’re going to look at why sleep is important and how you can sleep better tonight.

The National Sleep Foundation Recommends

sleeping recommendations

General benefits of getting a good night’s sleep

  • Having a restful night of sleep is physically restorative, allowing tissues to heal and grow. Energy is also replenished for the next day’s needs.
  • Sleep impacts mental health as well, reducing stress and anxiety. Additionally, sleep helps regulate emotions. In fact, a lack of sleep has been tied to depression.
  • Improved decision making and alertness.
  • Poor sleep habits in athletes increase the probability of fatigue, low energy levels, and reduces coordination and focus.

The effects of phone, tablet, and television screens:

  • Suppresses melatonin, the hormone responsible for the sleep/wake cycle.
  • Keeps the brain alert, delaying the onset of relaxation.
  • Devices wake people up from sleep with alerts, messages, etc.

You can actually see how well you prepare your body for sleep each night by completing a Sleep Hygiene Index (SHI).  According to the National Sleep Foundation, Sleep hygiene is a
variety of different practices and habits that are necessary to have good nighttime sleep quality and full daytime alertness.

For an improved quality of sleep

  • In addition to the above points, the use of devices may keep work-related stressors at the bedside. Try to spend the 30 minutes prior to sleep device-free.
  • Get in a routine. If you are not sleeping the recommended duration, try going to bed 10-15 minutes earlier each week.
  • Add exercise to your daily routine.
  • Avoid taking naps in the afternoon.

Finding the Right Sleeping Position

Sleeping is one of the most important things that we can do for our bodies. Our bodies utilize this time for recovery and sleeping in a position that causes pain can prevent the body from recovering. Therefore, finding an appropriate sleeping position that results in your body feeling at ease is very important.

Common Position to Avoid While Sleeping:

Studies have shown that sleeping on your stomach can put a lot of stress on the lumbar spine. Naturally, the lumbar spine is curved, however, while sleeping on your stomach, the spine becomes even more curved and results in more stress put on the ligaments of the spine. Furthermore, this can cause additional stress on the cervical spine and neck. Stomach sleepers have to turn their head to either side while sleeping and as a result “this locks up the neck and does not allow blood to flow to the proper places while sleeping, thus acting as a barrier to recovery from daily stress” (Total Performance, 2012) If you do enjoy sleeping on your stomach, consider putting a pillow under your hips to help reduce back pain.

Positions to Consider While Sleeping:

Sleeping in the fetal position is probably the most popular position to sleep in. It helps ease low back pain and is a great position for mothers-to-be.

Sleeping on your back puts less stress on your head, neck, and spine and makes it easier for your spine to maintain a neutral position. It also helps fight acid reflux due to the elevated position of the head and the position of the stomach being below the esophagus. Most studies have shown that one of the best sleeping positions is on the back with a pillow underneath your legs. While many patients complain that this sleeping position is painful or causes snoring, others have found relief due to the many benefits.

Sleeping on your side can also decrease stress on your back. Sometimes a pillow between your legs or under your trunk may also be beneficial to decrease stress on your back.

Sleep Better
How to Sleep Better – Facebook Live by Spring Klein Physical Therapy

 

As physical therapists, we understand the importance of sleep. Part of rehabilitation is educating patients on how to sleep in a position that won’t aggravate the injury as they heal. If you are in pain and having trouble sleeping, or if you wake up from sleep with pain, please let us know so that we can help.  We want you to get a good night sleep and wake up feeling refreshed!

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Stay Mentally and Physically Active

How to Stay Physically and Mentally Active During Isolation

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Stay Mentally and Physically Active

Self-isolation during the coronavirus pandemic has come as quite a shock to many of us – especially those who are used to a more active lifestyle. And while we are waiting for the day when we can safely return to life as we once knew it, let’s focus our efforts on staying active both physically and mentally even though we are stuck in our homes.

Here are eight tips to get you motivated and started:

1. Do some stretches

As your body is now moving less than it is used to (and probably less than it needs to), you need to find new ways to keep it active.
You can start by doing some morning and evening stretches. There are simple routines you can try even if you are not very fit that will get your blood flowing and prevent your muscles from getting stiff.

2. Get up every hour

Set a reminder on your phone to go off every hour, as a way to trigger yourself to get up. Whether you are in a chair or on the couch at the time, get up, walk around a bit, and move your arms and legs. Stretches will be fine here too, but you can also incorporate some light exercises. Even seniors can do a light cardio workout or lift some moderate weights if the doctor allows.

3. Do an online workout

Everyone seems to be streaming their workouts these days, so you’re bound to find something you like. There are Pilates workouts you can try, there’s yoga, there are ballet-inspired classes, but you can also just do some bodyweight work, do indoor walking, and so on.
Just make sure that the intensity and activity level of the workout you are choosing to watch matches your actual fitness levels.

4. Walk when it is safe

If you live in an area where you are still allowed to take walks, make sure you take advantage of this option. As little as 30 minutes of walking a day will suffice to keep you healthy.

Don’t neglect the rules of social distancing while you are outside – and remind yourself you need to prevent yourself from touching your face.

5. Read and write

Self-isolation is a great time to catch up on some reading – whether you have a novel on your bookshelf you can’t seem to get to or choose to download something to your Kindle, make sure you keep your mind engaged with a new read.

You can also add journaling to your routine, and spend a couple of minutes every day writing down your thoughts (with pen and paper). It doesn’t have to be anything in particular – just enjoy expressing your thoughts and feelings for the day.

6. Watch something you haven’t seen yet

Since all kinds of streaming services are now turning out to be our savior, make sure you use them to their fullest. But don’t just keep staring at a screen all day.

Set aside sometime each day (or each week) for watching a program, and don’t overdo it. You can focus on documentaries, old classics you haven’t seen yet, or the latest Netflix sensation. Your favorite feel-good movies are also a welcome distraction.

7. Try something new

Everyone online keeps telling you, you should learn a new skill, but this is not imperative. You can, however, try doing something you don’t usually do. This can be something as simple as a new recipe, brushing your teeth with the other hand, doing your hair differently, sleeping on the other side of the bed – anything that will be a new experience for your body or mind is a good choice.

8. Make plans for later

Even though you may not be able to go outside or travel, you can still mentally prepare and experience some of the things you will be doing once the danger lifts.

You can start jotting down the places you want to visit, things you want to buy and do, and do little mental walks to your favorite places. And don’t let these exercises make you feel bad because you don’t have access to them now. Focus on the feeling of joy they cause, and let yourself feel the pleasure.

While self-isolation is certainly not a pleasant experience, it is only ever as bad as you let it be. Focusing on the positives instead of the negatives will help you get through it easier – and sooner.

prevent pain caused from repetitive movements

Tips to Prevent Pain Caused by Repetitive Movements

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prevent pain caused from repetitive movements

The modern lifestyle involves a lot of repetitive movements. Whether it’s industrial labor or computer-related work like typing, the chances are it has given you injuries. Even in your normal day to day life, using smartphones or tablets can really wear away at you. Much of this is related to a condition called repetitive strain injury and can range in severity. Mild aches in your extremities can develop into severe pain if not maintained or checked on. However, there are some ways you can prevent pain caused by repetitive movements.

The key to preventing pain is ensuring there are measures in place to stop it from happening in the first place. For personal situations, it’s sometimes a matter of common sense and caution. In the workplace, things can be more uncertain, so here are some tips.

Work Environment:

Setting up your work area for the day can be an important start. Workshops or industrial areas must be cleared of hazards and potential accidents. If you work at a desk or on a computer, set your chair up in a way that will reduce strain. Many cases of repetitive movement occur from being forced to work around your environment. The best method is prevention, and having your workplace accommodate you is a much simpler solution.

Regular Breaks:

Set regular breaks during your shift, incorporate stretches and exercises into these free periods. Even if you don’t have time for exercise, making use of small windows is good. If you’ve been stuck to a desk all day, try walking around the office or walking over to co-workers instead of emailing or messaging them.

If you’re a laborer in a warehouse, swap up positions, or rotate duties with a co-worker. An essential part of reducing repetitive movement is breaking off when you can and giving your body a change of pace. This is especially important on long workdays where you’re more likely to be worn out at the end of your shift.

Posture & Strain:

Bad posture can be the cause of many injuries, especially for the back and neck. If you work sitting down, make sure you have a proper office chair that can stand being used for over six hours a day. Laborers are taught how to handle heavy loads, making use of their knees and arms to reduce strained postures.

A lot of repetitive strain can come from tense muscles. This can be a result of many things, including stress or hyper-focusing. It’s important not to overdo any actions: try softer keystrokes or a relaxed grip — these will greatly reduce strain.

Repetitive movement still happens outside of the workplace, and the chances of developing injuries are just as common. If you are experiencing pain visiting a physical or occupational therapist can help you find the relief you need. Potential injuries caused by repetitive movement can be mitigated when addressed early. Physical and/or occupational therapy is a great way to help the body recover from and prevent future overuse injuries.

General Well-being:

On top of these, keeping your personal lifestyle as healthy as possible is also beneficial. Regular exercise and a good diet will promote toned muscles, healthy blood flow, and an overall stronger recovery system for your body. It also helps prevent some symptoms of repetitive strain, which include fatigue and weakness.

While repetitive movement is common in everyday life, that doesn’t make it any less important when avoiding injuries. The strain caused by such movement always has the chance to develop into severe pains that could require surgery. It can be prevented, however, with a good mix of preparation and attention.

Chronic repetitive strain injury pain left untreated may result in surgery. If your RSI pain has not gone away or continues to worsen please reach out to a local rehab provider for help. The faster you seek help, the sooner the body will recover.

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Author bio:
After a long day’s work, Harper turns to yoga and meditation to successfully relax and destress. She’s also drawn to the Blues and easy-listening music. Check out her written pieces on her personal blog, Harper Reid.

Stay Active While Social Distancing

4 Ways to Stay Active While Social Distancing

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Stay Active While Social Distancing

Most of us have found ourselves at home looking for things to do. Even though we may not be able to make it to the gym or to a group class with friends, there are still ways to stay active while social distancing at home.

Here are our top 4 ways to keep moving.

  1. Go for a walk or run: Getting some fresh air and going for a walk or run in an uncrowded location is a great way to get some exercise in. The CDC recommends 6 feet of distance between yourself and others, so make sure you choose a path or trail that allows for space.
  2. Do housework: You have stocked up on cleaning supplies; now it’s time to get some exercise out of it! Whether it’s washing dishes, vacuuming, or dusting, the time spent on your feet and moving around can add up to a fully productive and active day – not to mention the result of having a clean living space.
  3. Have a dance party: It might not be the same as a traditional Zumba class, but all you need to get the party started is some music that can get you moving. Whether it be salsa, a line dance, or maybe even the floss, dancing is a sure way to get your heart rate up.
  4. Living room resistance training: Squats, lunges, planks, and push-ups can all be done at home without the need of a gym or weights. These exercises use your body weight to help train. If you need guidance on getting started or making sure you have exercises that you can do safely, please call us for help.

We hope you have fun staying active with these exercise ideas. If you need help getting started or have questions, please reach out to any of our physical therapy clinics. They can work with you to create an in-home exercise plan that works for you and your ability levels.

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PT News PTandMe

PT News January 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout January 2020. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. How to Keep Up With Your New Year’s Resolutions

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout San Antonio, TX.

Did you set a health or fitness goal for this new year/new decade? Maybe it was running, joining a gym, drinking more water or even getting more sleep. No matter what you choose, it’s important to have a goal in mind. We have all heard the statistics on resolutions, especially when it comes to fitness-related resolutions.  Read more

 

2. Winter Activities Foster Year-Round Fitness

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Virginia and Maryland. 

The urge to “hibernate” in winter is strong, even for us humans. However, you are better off staying in shape than struggling to catch up come spring. And winter exercise benefits more than just physical fitness; it is also a powerful antidote for the winter blues. Read more

 

3. What is a Hand Therapist

Written by Desert Hand and Physical Therapy an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Phoenix, AZ.

Physical therapy is something we may have all heard about, but hand therapy might be unfamiliar territory. Although physical therapy and hand therapy are similar, there are some major differences between the two that should be understood.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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benefits of a home exercise program

Why Should I Do My Home Exercise Program?

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benefits of a home exercise program

When a patient walks in for physical therapy, one of the things they are sent home with is a home exercise program. But why do they do that? Aren’t they supposed to take care of everything while you are in the clinic?  These are questions that may run through your head, but what exactly are the benefits of a home exercise program? If you’re on the fence of whether or not to take your HEP seriously, we’re here to tell you why you should.

  • Continuation of forwarding progression in rehabilitation: Physical and occupational therapists tailor each program to the abilities and strengths of each patient. A patient that completes their home exercise program is more likely to excel in the one-on-one sessions at the clinic and experience fewer setbacks in rehabilitation.
  • Increases level of mobility and endurance: Exercise in the home is designed to continue the progress of the clinic visit by increasing a patient’s flexibility and stamina. A good home exercise program allows a patient to increase function and improve muscle memory so that progress is gained rather than lost from one visit to another.
  • For some patients, therapy doesn’t end at discharge: A home exercise program can help a patient remain pain-free and functional without having to pay for repeat visits and costly medical bills. For patients experiencing chronic pain – a home exercise program is a ticket to staying out of the doctor’s office.

Despite the benefits of a home exercise program, patients have trouble following through on their home exercise program goals. We’re going to go over some of the more common excuses:

  • I don’t have time, because life at home is too busy: It can be hard, especially for those running a household with multiple schedules to accommodate. However, a physical therapist can offer suggestions on working these into your schedule. Some exercises can be done at work, at home, on the playground. If time is truly a concern than don’t be afraid to let the therapist know.
  • It hurts: Some pain is considered normal – it’s a normal part of exercise. However, if you are doing an exercise and something feels wrong, let your physical therapist know immediately. Don’t wait until your next appointment and tell yourself you will take care of it then. It could be something as simple as not doing the exercise correctly and they can talk you through it over the phone. Communication is a large part of rehabilitation and your therapist wants to know if something is causing concern.
  • Not motivated: Not seeing the point of the exercises your therapist gave you – ask them why it is so beneficial. Going to see a physical therapist 2-3 times a week alone without doing home exercises will not be enough to maintain muscle strength and flexibility. Healthy habits begin with persistence. If you need motivation talk to your therapist, they are born motivators and want nothing more than to watch you succeed. Enlist the help of family or friends to keep asking about your progress.

Physical therapists may utilize print copies of exercises or they may choose to go utilize a digital version that you can access from a mobile device. No matter the delivery, the goal for each is the same. To help you heal more effectively. If you have questions about your home exercise program and what it contributes to your recovery talk to your physical therapist. Education and understanding are crucial to making sure your experience in recovery is successful. If you need help finding a physical therapist to answer your questions, we have you covered in our “Find a PT” section.

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