Category Archives: General Information

opioid crisis physical therapy

CDC Launches Opioid Campaign in Hard-Hit States

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The U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched a campaign to reduce overdose deaths from prescription opioid painkillers. Between 1999 and 2015, more than 183,000 people in the United States died from prescription opioid overdoses such as OxyContin (oxycodone) and Vicodin (hydrocodone). The goal of the CDC’s Rx Awareness campaign is to increase knowledge of the risks of prescription opioids and stop inappropriate use. Personal accounts from recovering opioid abusers and people who’ve lost loved ones will be featured. “It only takes a little to lose a lot” is the campaign tagline. It will be featured in videos, audio ads, social media ads, internet banners, web graphics, billboards and posters. Campaign ads are planned to run for the next 14 weeks in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Mexico and Ohio. The campaign will expand to other states as more funding becomes available. “This campaign is part of CDC’s continued support for states on the frontlines of the opioid overdose epidemic,” CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in an agency news release. “These heartbreaking stories of the devastation brought on by opioid abuse have the potential to open eyes and save lives,” she said. In 2015, 12.5 million people in the United States misused prescription opioids. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for prescription opioid misuse and more than 40 people die from prescription opioid overdoses. Prescription opioid abuse is also a major risk factor for heroin use. About three-quarters of new heroin users misused prescription opioids before using heroin.

Manage pain safely with physical therapy. Physical therapy is a safe non-invasive form of treatment for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain or injuries. Great candidates to be referred to physical therapy instead of prescribing pain pills include:

  • A patient that has had pain for more than 90 days
  • A patient that complains of pain disturbing their sleep or daily activities
  • A patient that has a history of substance abuse or has been on pain medication for an extended period of time
  • A patient that expresses an interest in avoiding opioids

Try Physical Therapy and experience the difference. For more information about what physical therapy can treat. Visit the PTandMe Injury Center.

For more information, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on prescription opioids.

HealthDay News

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

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PT News February 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout February 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Cold Weather Exercise Tips
Written by IRG with physical therapy locations throughout Puget Sound, Seattle and the surrounding areas.

Are you planning to take your exercise outside this winter? Here are a few things to keep in mind for pre-and-post workouts in the elements this season.  Read more

 

2. Can I Exercise Safely with a Cold?
Written by the Therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics with physical therapy locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The average adult gets one to six colds every year, with symptoms lasting a week to 10 days. Should you let these colds interrupt your exercise routine? Probably not, as long as you pay attention to what your body tells you. Read more

 

3. Physical Therapy for the Treatment of Osteoporosis
Written by the physical therapy team at Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates with locations throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester, PA counties.

Osteoporosis is the leading cause of fractures in the elderly. It is a disease which causes diminished bone mass and leads to a decrease in bone quality which results in increased risk for bone fractures. Fractures can lead to functional disability, chronic pain, and at times, early death. Read more

Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts This February

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Heart Disease to Healthy Hearts

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are four times more likely to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

According to the Office of Disease Prevention you can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease.

To lower your risk you can:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.
The American Heart Association also has some great resources on their website including tips to stay active, and how to make every move count!

If you need help finding exercises and activities that fit your lifestyle and abilities talk to your physical therapist. PT’s specialize in the science of movement, so who better to ask! If you don’t have a physical therapist make sure you check out our PT finder and get started on your path to a healthy heart this February!

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PT News January 2019

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout January 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

neck pain

1. Improving your Bed & Workstation Setup can Help Reduce your Neck Pain
Written by Sport & Spine Physical Therapy with 5 physical therapy locations throughout Southern Wisconsin.

The neck has an incredibly important job to do. It supports the head and allows us to move it in a wide range of directions so that we can better navigate the world around us. But because of how frequently it’s used and its position in the body, the neck is also a very common location for pain, and sometimes all it takes is one bad night’s sleep to ruin your day.  Read more

 

Dry Needling

2. What is Dry Needling and How Does it Work?
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy with 12 physical therapy locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

You may have heard of acupuncture, but have you heard of dry needling? If you’re up for trying new things to help with your physical therapy, keep reading to get more information on dry needling and how it works in physical therapy.  Read more

Work Injury Patient

3. Rehabilitation Program Gets Man Safely Back to Work After Two Different Operations
Written by the physical therapy team at Ability Rehabilitation with locations throughout Greater Orlando and the Tampa Bay Area

Carlos needed two different surgical procedures three years apart to repair a torn rotator cuff and an injured bicep muscle. But he also had a family to support and a paycheck to earn; he didn’t have the luxury of taking an extended leave of absence from work. Read more

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PT News December 2018

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout December, 2018. Featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Shedding Holiday Pounds

1. Shed Those Extra Holiday Pounds
Written by The Jackson Clinics with physical therapy locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The holidays are here once again, with all their edible temptations, and you would like to get into better shape after they have passed. This time you are determined to find an approach that will prevent frustration, keep you motivated and help you achieve your fitness goal.  Read more

 

Snow Shoveling

2. Prevent Low Back Pain While Shoveling Snow
Written by the Therapy Team at Rehab Associates of Central VA with 11 physical therapy locations throughout Central Virginia.

As I was shoveling the snow off my driveway this week, I quickly realized that I needed to adjust my technique or I was going to pay for it later. Injury can result from repetitive movements with a general lack of awareness and variability in movement and may be prevented with some easy steps.  Read more

Fire fighter workers compensation

3. One Fire Captain’s Story: From a Workers’ Comp Injury to a Full Recovery
Written by the Therapy Team at ARC Physical Therapy+ with locations across Kansas, Missouri and Iowa

Bryan Bogue, the Fire Captain with the City of Independence, Missouri Fire Department was on a medical call and needed to lift a heavy bag over a concrete wall. It seemed like a fairly straightforward task until he raised his arms and felt a tendon snap in his elbow. The pain was immediate and severe. Read more

PT can Help

Elf Injuries and How PT Can Help: Part 1 of 3

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Elf Injuries_2016-11_FBsize

It’s that time of year, when we check in on Santa’s helpers to see if they can use some physical therapy. With their heavy lifting and high demand job they’re always experiencing injuries. Our new elf friend Ziggy, is the perfect patient for physical therapy. Let’s see how PT can help Ziggy!

Here’s part of his story…

Ziggy was working late one night in the North Pole. When all of a sudden… he lifted a large toy scooter and fell over on to his back. OUCH!

elf on PT & Me website

Luckily, Santa and his elves have an amazingly good north pole internet provider, and Ziggy was able to go online to the PTandMe website and find great physical therapy clinics in his area.

elf on pt table

Now Ziggy is at one of PT & Me’s physical therapy clinics with one of our trusted therapists to help relieve him of all his back pain. He will be back to making more toys real soon, just in time for the holiday!

See Ziggy’s complete physical therapy experience here!

elf injuries physical therapy PTandMe   Elf on the Shelf Physical Therapy

elf injuries

Special thanks to Action Physical Therapy, in Houston, TX, for accommodating the demanding work schedule of Santa’s elves. Click Here for more information about Action Physical Therapy.

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PT News November 2018

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This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November, 2018. Featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Seeing a physical therapist first with Direct Access

1. Seeing A Physical Therapist First, Through Direct Access, Improves Outcomes and Saves Money
Written by Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates with six physical therapy locations throughout Montgomery, Berks and Chester, PA Counties.

With direct access, getting the help you need has never been easier. Direct access is a law that allows you to seek care from your physical therapist without a physician referral. This means that as a patient, you can call us directly if you have an injury, pain, stiffness, or weakness that you want evaluated.  Read more

 

things you should know about vertigo

2. Things You Should Know About Vertigo
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy with 12  physical therapy locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

While anti-nausea medication and rest can help, there are ways to treat vertigo without medication. Vertigo can be helped with physical therapy. BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo), commonly described as having “loose crystals in the inner ear,” is the most common type of treated with physical therapy.  Read more

Questions to ask before surgery

3. Questions To Ask Before Choosing Surgery
Written by the Therapy Team at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with 6, but soon to be 7, physical therapy locations throughout the Greater Grand Rapids Area.

Having surgery can be an intimidating process. Know what your surgical goals are. Are you looking to return to normal daily life functions or do you have plans to return to or start into high-level fitness/athletics? Read more

lack of exercise worse than smoking

Lack of Exercise Worse than Smoking, Diabetes, and Heart Disease

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lack of exercise worse than smoking

As physical therapists, it is our job to promote movement and overall well-being.  Exercising regularly is linked to better physical and mental health and can help to prevent or delay heart disease, strokes, certain types of cancer, and diabetes. What is perhaps less known is that not being active can be harmful to your health. This lifestyle, called sedentary, has been linked to a number of preventable diseases. Researchers wanted to assess the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on all-cause mortality. The study, published in JAMA, suggests that a sedentary lifestyle has a larger impact on our health than previously thought.

About the study
The study by Jama included 122,007 participants at an academic medical center. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were 59% male. Among these, 13,637 died during the study.

The study followed participants for median of 8.4 years. Their physical fitness was measured using exercise treadmill testing and they were arranged by age and gender into the following performance groups:

  • Low—less active than 25% of participants
  • Below average—less active than 49% of participants
  • Above average—more active than at least 50% of participants
  • High—more active than at least 75% of participants
  • Elite—more active than almost 98% of participants

The study found that death from any cause was lowest among elite category. Death rates were highest among those in low category. It also found that the increase in risk of death linked to sedentary behavior was equal to or greater than the risk of death from smoking, diabetes, and heart disease.

How Does This Affect You?

Cohort studies are observational studies. These studies simply observe events as they unfold, but do not interfere or introduce factors that can affect the outcome. While they can’t show direct cause and effect, they can show a possible link between two factors. A large number of studies have found that sedentary behavior affects health, however this is the first that showed it may be as significant as smoking, diabetes, or heart disease.

If you are sedentary, start moving. Make changes in small increments to help you adjust. Starting a workout routine can be a challenge, but with the help of a physical therapist, you can learn how to get started and safely build up to a regular routine. Work toward at least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity aerobic activity. Here are some tips to help you get started:

  • Start with short episodes of activity. Try doing 3-4 bouts of walking for 10 minutes at a time, spread throughout the day.
  • Try out different activities to see which work best for you.
  • Look for opportunities to move during the day. Take stairs instead of the elevator, park a little further away, or walk instead of taking your car. Little bits can add up and help you reach longer goals.

If you are already active, keep it up! Make sure to schedule activity into your daily routine.

Need help getting started? We have some great ideas for you here!

exercise tips starting a workout program

SOURCES:

2008 physical activity guidelines for Americans Summary. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion website. Available at: https://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/summary.aspx. Accessed October 25, 2018.

Mandsager K, Harb S, et al. Association of cardiorespiratory fitness with long-term mortality among adults undergoing exercise treadmill testing. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1(6):e183605. Available at: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2707428?resultClick=3. Accessed October 25, 2018.

physical therapy after a car accident

Who Pays for Physical Therapy After a Car Accident?

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physical therapy after a car accident

Being involved in a car accident can be a life-changing event. The shock alone from the accident can lead to emotional trauma, particularly if you are injured. Ideally, you will let your insurance company handle all aspects of recuperating any compensation due to you. This will include monies for damage to your vehicle as well as for your injuries. In addition to medical expenses, you will need to collect compensation for lost wages and pain and suffering. If you have to go through physical therapy, you will want to be compensated for those expenses, as well. Ideally, you will not have to pay anything out of pocket for medical expenses.

Who Is Responsible for Your Physical Therapy Expenses in a Car Accident?

If you are injured in a car accident, there’s a good chance you may have to go through physical therapy to enhance your recovery. Your insurance will be able to help you pinpoint the party that is responsible for paying for the therapy. If the accident is deemed as your fault, your insurance company will pay for the therapy up to a certain amount. The exact policy you have will determine what this limit is.

If the other person is at fault, then their insurance will cover your physical therapy expenses. Oftentimes, there is a medical expense limit in place, such as $30,000. If your expenses exceed this limit, this doesn’t mean the at-fault party’s insurance is not going to cover more. In addition to medical expense coverage, the person’s insurance will likely offer you some type of settlement. Never should you accept the settlement if you don’t talk to a car accident lawyer first. This lawyer can help you determine if the settlement is reasonable. Much of the time, the lawyer can speak with the insurance company and get you a settlement that is two to three times as much as the initial offer, which will be of the utmost help when covering your physical therapy expenses.

If the other party does not have car insurance and you are not at fault, your insurance still may provide medical coverage to a certain amount. Beyond that amount, you would have to sue the at-fault party to cover your physical therapy expenses.

How Do I Recover Physical Therapy Expenses From an Accident?

The best way to recover physical therapy expenses is through the at-fault party’s insurance. Your insurance company or the other person’s insurance company may try to offer you a low-ball settlement amount. Have an attorney speak with the insurance companies for you and make sure you receive as much money as possible to pay for your physical therapy expenses, lost wages, pain, and suffering, and more.

How to Prove Your Expense?

No matter who is at fault for the accident, you will have to prove your physical therapy expenses in order to receive coverage for them. Many times, the physical therapist that you receive therapy from will bill the insurance company directly. If not, you will need to provide receipts that outline the services rendered as well as doctor notes detailing how the therapy relates to the injury sustained in the car accident.

Paying for Long-Term Injuries That Require Physical Therapy

Many people who are injured in a car accident will have to go through numerous sessions of physical therapy. Sometimes, these sessions can last for many years, especially if the person has suffered from a severe injury. Hopefully, the at-fault party’s insurance will have a liability coverage limit in place that exceeds what you have to pay for physical therapy. If not, you will have to use the settlement funds to pay for your expenses. You can speak with your physical therapist to determine how long it is predicted that it will take you to recover. From there, a settlement amount can be agreed upon with the at-fault party’ insurance that will likely cover your predicted expenses.

Who Do I Bring a Claim Against for Compensation If I Need Physical Therapy?

The entity to which you will bring a claim against for compensation if you need physical therapy will depend on the details of the accident. If you were at fault, you will need to speak with your own insurance company. However, because insurance language can be difficult to understand and because you likely don’t understand all of your rights, it is extremely important to have a qualified attorney speak with your insurance company for you. A physician can even speak with the insurance company to let them know how extensive your injuries are.

If another person is at fault, your claim will need to be brought against that person’s insurance or that person. Hopefully, you will have a lawyer handling all communications for you, allowing you to focus on your recovery and not have to worry about speaking with insurance companies. This lawyer can speak with your physical therapist to ensure everyone is on the same page regarding your injuries and compensation.

Collecting Compensation for Physical Therapy Costs After an Accident

There is an extensive process that must be followed in order to collect compensation for physical therapy after a car accident. All of the involved steps have to be completed thoroughly and effectively the first time around or the process has to be started over. Receiving all monies owed to you will be of the utmost help in covering your physical therapy expenses. It also will help pay for the daily living expenses that you incur while recovering, which can add up quickly and will become a financial burden since you won’t be able to work.

walking zombies

How Much Walking Can Zombies Do?

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walking zombies

As Halloween approaches it’s hard not to consider our monster what-if’s. So we just decided to go with it and take a look at just how far our limbs can carry us without sustaining injury, assuming they weren’t eaten during the unfortunate event that caused us to turn into zombies in the first place. Zombies quite frankly do a lot of walking; most of it is rather aimless but all in all they seem to cover quite a bit of distance. If we were doomed to spend eternity in a constant state of walk/run/hobble we would likely find that zombies might experience many of the same injuries that our fellow runners face.  Here’s a few that we came up with.

IT (Iliotibial) Band Syndrome is caused by improper footwear and the increasing of mileage and/or intensity too quickly. Symptoms manifest after a short period of running with a sharp pain on the outside of the knee.

Piriformis Syndrome is commonly caused by increase in mileage and/or intensity, and poor running mechanics associated with weak hips and core. The symptoms include local pain and tightness in the buttocks with possible tingling or numbness down the back of the leg.

Shin Splints, caused by improper footwear, lack of flexibility in the calves and running on hard surfaces, they cause a throbbing or aching pain along the front of the shin usually occurring during or following a prolonged walk or run.

Runner’s Knee, caused by increasing distance and/or as well as poor running mechanics. It’s symptoms include swelling and aching pain behind and/or around the kneecap and pain walking up and down stairs.

Now, how do we combat these injuries?

Always begin activity with a light warm up 10 minutes spent following that light rustle in the woods would serve you better than an all-out sprint towards your next unsuspecting victim

Stretch, reaching overhead to get the foot on the ledge or bending down to get to the snack hiding under the car

Rest, when that same snack locks you in a closet just go with it you could use the break.

And lastly shoes. Proper footwear is essential so let’s hope that you weren’t turned on flip flop day or in those 6 inch heels.

But in all seriousness whether you are a runner, walker, pro, novice, or zombie you never have to live in pain. Don’t be afraid to seek help if injury occurs, the best treatment for an injury is early management and education.