Category Archives: Hand

PT News PTandMe

PT News September 2020

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout September 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Virtual Total Body Fitness Workout

Created by The Center for Physical Rehabilitation with locations throughout Greater Grand Rapids, MI.

This bodyweight-only class is sure to get your heart rate up and muscles burning! With modifications available to increase or decrease the intensity, this exercise circuit is great for everyone! Not ready to resume in-person classes? No problem! Check out this Virtual Fitness Class options here! Read more

 

2. Excercise Improves Learning

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia. 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, e-learning platforms have quickly become how many children will learn this Fall. As a result, our kids will experience a sharp jump in their screen time. Now, more than ever, we need to help to counteract this rise in sedentary time with some good old fashioned exercise and playtime!  Read more

 

3. Minimizing Opioid Use Through Physical Therapy

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Southern, ID.

Chronic pain affects nearly one-third of the American population and is, more often than not, disabling. The assurance of repose can sound promising no matter which pain relief option is presented, even if the option is the introduction of habit-forming prescription medications. Despite the daunting stats, there is great news! Physical therapy (PT) is powerful as a highly recommended alternative to the use of dangerous and addictive pain medications.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News August 2020

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June & July 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Sports Periodization Can Help You Peak and Avoid Overuse Injuries

Written by Physical Therapy Plus with locations in Clinton, Hackettstown, and Washington, NJ.

As unfortunate as it is true, injuries and sports go hand in hand. An average of 8.6 million injuries in sports and recreational activities occur each year, which equates to about 34 injuries for every 1,000 individuals that participate. While some minor injuries might only lead to a short gap in participation, others can end seasons and lead to long-term complications if not rehabilitated properly.  Read more

 

sport specialization

2. Baseball Throwing Injuries

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

Most states have moved away from self-quarantine and are now resuming the “new normal” with COVID-19 in our midst. From March through June, youth and adolescent sports were canceled. Sports organizations are now trying to play catch up by squeezing spring and summer sports into July and August. With this ramp-up in games, we have seen a significant increase in sports-related injuries, especially baseball throwing injuries. Two such injuries are growth plate injuries of the throwing elbow and shoulder.  Read more

 

3. Get Back In The Saddle With Help from a Hand Therapist

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Bend, OR.

Reaching out your arm to brace for a fall is instinctual. It’s no surprise, then, that some of the most common mountain biking injuries are fractures of the wrist, hands, fingers, and elbows. When a bike’s front tire hits a rock or loose dirt, it can cause the rider to fly off the bike and land on an outstretched arm.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News July 2020

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout June & July 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Now is the Time to Start Physical Therapy

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout Berks & Montgomery Counties in PA.

Now is the time to focus on your health and treat the pain that is limiting your function, leading to poor quality of life. This is the perfect time to start physical therapy. We can help!  Read more

 

physical therapy for headaches

2. Physical Therapy for Cervical Headaches

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Central Virginia 

There are multiple types of headaches. Often a simple exam and a few questions can rule in or out cervical headaches as the cause. Very rarely are expensive imaging and testing is needed to achieve a diagnosis. Following an initial evaluation, a physical therapist will have the basis for understanding Read more

 

physical therapy for arthritis

3. Physical Therapy: Treating Arthritis the Safe and Easy Way

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with 6 locations throughout the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Area.

Anyone living with arthritis knows how debilitating it can be. Several people dealing with arthritic aches and pains end up resorting to steroid injections, antirheumatic drugs, or even joint replacement surgery, in order to manage their pain. However, physical therapy itself has proven successful for many arthritis sufferers.  Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News January 2020

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout January 2020. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. How to Keep Up With Your New Year’s Resolutions

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple locations throughout San Antonio, TX.

Did you set a health or fitness goal for this new year/new decade? Maybe it was running, joining a gym, drinking more water or even getting more sleep. No matter what you choose, it’s important to have a goal in mind. We have all heard the statistics on resolutions, especially when it comes to fitness-related resolutions.  Read more

 

2. Winter Activities Foster Year-Round Fitness

Written by The Jackson Clinics, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Virginia and Maryland. 

The urge to “hibernate” in winter is strong, even for us humans. However, you are better off staying in shape than struggling to catch up come spring. And winter exercise benefits more than just physical fitness; it is also a powerful antidote for the winter blues. Read more

 

3. What is a Hand Therapist

Written by Desert Hand and Physical Therapy an outpatient physical and hand therapy practice with locations throughout Phoenix, AZ.

Physical therapy is something we may have all heard about, but hand therapy might be unfamiliar territory. Although physical therapy and hand therapy are similar, there are some major differences between the two that should be understood.   Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News September 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout September 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with three locations in New London County, CT.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a type of injury called a peripheral nerve entrapment. What this means is that it is a condition in which the median nerve gets compressed and irritated as it passes through a structure called the carpal tunnel, located on the palm side of your wrist. The carpal tunnel is formed by the carpal (wrist) bones and connective tissue and protects the median nerve and finger flexor tendons as they pass through the wrist.  Read more

 

2. Tommy John Elbow Ligament Injuries in Football Quarterbacks: Why are there significantly fewer injuries than in baseball pitchers?

Written by Mishock Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations throughout PA’s Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties. 

Recently Ben Roethlisberger, quarterback for the Pittsburgh Steelers, sustained an ulnar collateral ligament tear and subsequent surgery, ending his football season. Elbow injuries in football players are uncommon with 92% of the injuries being traumatic (contusions and dislocations), (Ortho J Sports Med 2019). Ulnar collateral ligament injuries in football quarterbacks are even more uncommon. Read more

 

Fire fighter workers compensation

3. Firefighter and Active Dad Gets Back to Work and Life 

Written by ARC Physical Therapy+ an outpatient physical therapy practice with locations across Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa

Marcus Winstead is a firefighter, husband, and father who enjoys leading an active lifestyle with his wife and three children.  “I’ve been a firefighter for 13 years”, Marcus explained. “Throughout that time, I’ve been on numerous calls and in very unique and challenging situations. As luck would have it, I was injured during a training exercise. I had two-disc injuries (protrusion and extrusion between L4-L5/L5-S1).” Read more

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

physical therapy near me

carpal tunnel

Carpal Tunnel Causes, Relief, and Treatment

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

carpal tunnel

What is carpal tunnel and why does it hurt so much?

The carpal tunnel is a small space at the wrist in which the median nerve and nine tendons pass through. The median nerve travels on top of the tendons through the tunnel. The tunnel itself is made up of your wrist bones and along the top of the tunnel is a thick fibrous ligament called the transverse carpal ligament. If the tendons become swollen (tenosynovitis) or if the tunnel size itself decreases because of injury, compression to the median nerve can occur. Symptoms may include: pain during pinching and gripping, a feeling of clumsiness – the inability to hold things, numbness in the fingers at night, or a radiating pain up the arm.

Risk factors at home and at work

There are many factors that can contribute to pain in the carpal tunnel, but these are some of the most common causes.

  • Repetition – Overuse can occur with light forces. Irritation of the tendon can be caused by rapid, repetitive activity without a break. Decreased blood flow to the nerves and tendons may be caused by holding or gripping an object without relaxation.
  • Force – The muscles of the hand and fingers are contracted when gripping or pinching. These contractions place stress on the tendons that go through the carpal tunnel. Higher forces are more likely to expose you to greater risks.
  • Bending – The tendons in the carpal tunnel can be irritated by bending your hand. Bending your hand up, down, or sideways may inflame the tendons in the carpal tunnel.
  • Vibration – Nerves are especially susceptible to vibration. Common causes of vibration of the nerves in the carpal tunnel are power tools, steering wheels, or other mechanized equipment.
  • Impact – Your hand is not a tool. Hitting, moving, or jerking objects may damage the structures of the wrist. Even using a hammer transmits sudden force to these delicate structures.

Practicing prevention

The first line of defense against Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is reducing the risk factors that may lead to CTS. Look carefully at your equipment and tools and try to eliminate the forces that are risk factors. This can include bending, vibration, impact, and repetition.

  • Tool Handles – A handle should have an optimum grip span of about 2 ¼ inches.
  • Gripping Surface – Use rubberized coating or tubing on your gripping surface. This will lower the grip strength required to hold onto the tool.
  • Reduction in vibration – Place a rubber or gel material on the handles or utilize gloves with rubber inserts to reduce vibration.

Home treatment

  • Ice – Use an ice pack on the palm and wrist area for 10 minutes after intensive hand activities. This can be followed by the wrist stretches.
  • Rest – Rest your hands after frequent, forceful, or repetitive activities that last 30 – 60 minutes. Try doing a different activity which is not as stressful to your wrist and hand.

carpal tunnel

If your pain does not subside, call your physical therapist to schedule an appointment. Physical therapy may be able to reduce pain and remove the need for surgery.

physical therapy near me

PT News PTandMe

PT News April 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout April 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

shoulder impingement

1. The Truth Behind Shoulder Impingement
Written by Spectrum Physical Therapy with 3 physical therapy locations in Connecticut.

Shoulder impingement (Subacromial Impingement Syndrome) is a condition of the shoulder that results in pain felt at the front of the shoulder, under a bone called the acromion process, that is often worse with repetitive or frequent overhead activity.  Read more

 

what is certified hand therapy

2. What is Certified Hand Therapy?
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy with multiple physical therapy locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

You may have heard of Certified Hand Therapists (CHTs) and wondered if they are the only therapists that can treat hand injuries. You may have also wondered why therapists needed a special certification to treat a specific body part. Read more

 

wrist pain

3. The Power (and Weakness) of the Wrist
Written by the physical therapy team at Cornerstone Physical Therapy with 5 locations in Ohio.

A wrist fracture has the potential to impact daily life for an extended period of time. Wrist fractures result from falls, sports activities, and improper lifting. Owing to the complex architecture of the bones, muscles, and ligaments in the wrist and hand, healing can take a while. Read more

PT News PTandMe

PT News March 2019

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout March 2019. We are excited to begin a new year of new posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

trigger finger

1. What Triggers Trigger Finger?
Written by Rebound Physical Therapy with physical therapy locations throughout Bend, OR and the surrounding areas.

Trigger Finger seems to be a diagnosis many people are familiar with but not actually sure what the diagnosis entails and what can be done to prevent or treat it.  Read more

 

biceps tear

2. Patient Regains Use of Arm After Biceps Tear Surgery
Written by the Therapy Team at Ability Rehabilitation with multiple physical therapy locations throughout Central Florida.

After his biceps tendon repair surgery, Rob’s right arm was in a fragile state; it was locked at the elbow and Rob was fearful of moving it and causing further injury. Read more

 

pain neuroscience

3. Physical Therapists Undergo Pain Neuroscience Education
Written by the physical therapy team at ARC Physical Therapy+ with locations across Kansas, Missouri and Iowa.

Evidence has shown that neuroscience educational strategies focused on teaching people in pain more about the biological and physiological processes involved in their pain experience, changes patient beliefs regarding their pain, thus reducing the threat of pain. Read more

joint protection

Better Joints For A Better You

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

joint protection

Painful joints in your hand(s) can slow down how you function during the day. You may even be taking medication to control that pain. We would like to show you some joint protection techniques- this is one way to help decrease the pain, plus help protect your joints for the future. So what is joint protection? Joint protection is a simple way to change how you complete a normal activity to avoid putting stress and strain on the joints, causing less pain. Occupational Therapists (OT) have been teaching joint protection for over 20 years, by putting less force on the small joints in the hand; this can not only lead to pain relief, but also create less “wear and tear” on the joint. The next time you do an activity that results in pain to your hands, stop for a minute, and try to figure out what is causing the pain and what you can modify to make the activity less painful.

Here are some simple suggestions for changes to make to decrease the pain in your hand.  This does not have to cost a lot of money.  A little creativity can do the trick once you know what causes your pain. Many people complain of pain while writing, pinching, turning the key in the car, and can usually isolate the pain to the base of the thumb. One reason for this discomfort, for every 1 pound you pinch at the thumb tip, it delivers 12 pounds of force to the base of the thumb.

Most of the time the best way to modify your activity involves the slogan: “Bigger is Better”. The larger the pen, handle, key, utensil etc. the less force you apply to the joints in your hand. Regarding pens or pencils, especially if you write a lot, buy a bigger/wider pen, use a pen grip, or make your own using foam or soft tape. Below are some examples:

large pen grip  pen grip 2

Using spring loaded scissors take a lot of pressure off the base of the thumb, for those who use scissors consistently, most fabric stores carry this type of scissors. No matter what your “tool of trade” is you can always make the handle bigger for paintbrushes, on your tooth brush, any handle that is difficult or painful to grip. When opening jars, use your palm to turn the lid instead of your finger and thumb.

  

Believe it or not some simple ideas for gadgets can also help ease the pain to your hands. Again think of the things around the house, kitchen in particular, that causes increase pain. Here are a few solutions to some common problems causing pain to the hand(s). These gadgets can be found from kitchen stores, to dollar stores, and medical companies specializing in adaptive equipment. Sometimes just knowing what to look for is half the battle. Again, sometimes you can use foam or tape to build up handles on your favorite tools.

  • Use an electric can opener, or at least a manual can opener with big handles (especially the handle you turn).
  • A wide variety of jar openers are available, some can even attach under the cabinet. If not you should at least use a non-skid rubber surface to open all jars so you apply less force with your hands.
  • Paring knives, regular utensils, potato peelers all come with extra wide firm handles – they are also dishwasher safe.
  • Big plastic spoons, spatulas, tongs are made with wide handles.
  • Apple slicers, ice cream scoopers, pizza slicers, garlic press all come with easy to grip handles allowing use of your arm versus the small joints of your fingers.

Hopefully this has given you some ideas to modify the tasks that are painful to your hand(s). Occupational Therapists in particular Certified Hand Therapists (CHT) are your best resource for any injury or condition to your hand or upper extremity. A CHT works with patients with a variety of upper extremity disorders, including but not limited to tendon/nerve disorders & lacerations, fractures, inflammatory disorders, and nerve compressions. Many patients seeking the care of a hand therapist also suffer from such chronic problems as arthritis or neurological conditions. A hand therapist works closely with the physician to provide a continuum of care for patients.

This article was written by Kingwood Occupational and Physical Therapy in the Houston, Kingwood area. More information about the physical therapy Kingwood location can be found at www.kingwoodotpt.com

FOOSH

FOOSH – Silly Name, Serious Injury

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

FOOSH

One of the most common mechanism of injury from falls is called a FOOSH (Fall on an Out Stretched Hand) injury. Don’t let the funny name fool you. A FOOSH injury is one of the most debilitating ways to injure your upper extremity and cause a significant loss of function. A Foosh occurs when a person is on their way down during a fall and tries to brace for impact using their hands. This is a natural response to falling and is difficult to try and prevent. The resulting impact of the hand and wrist on the ground can cause varying types of injuries from strains and sprains to fractures of the hand, wrist, elbow or shoulder.

What to look for if you experience a FOOSH Injury

1. Fractures: Typically, the fractures of the forearm from a FOOSH are the easiest to spot. They become swollen and bruised very rapidly and are associated with a lot of pain. Often times they produce a visible bulging of the skin of the forearm which can even protrude outside of the body. Fractures of the wrist and forearm will need to be evaluated and often times re-set and casted. Following casting the person must regain strength and range of motion through a guided exercise program before normal function can return. These injuries may take as long as 12 weeks to heal, but as many as 20 weeks for return to normalcy. This process can be expedited significantly by a referral to a well-trained physical therapist.

2. Sprains: Sprains from a FOOSH are much more difficult to spot. A sprain is a common injury to a ligament that normally holds one bone to another as a part of a joint. It most likely causes moderate to severe swelling, bruising, and pain. The pain may occur both by moving the joint yourself or having someone else move the joint while you are relaxed. During a sprain, a non-contractile piece of tissue becomes torn partially or completely. The result is a joint that is too lax to allow proper joint stability. This can cause problems for years following the initial injury. Think of the brake system on your bicycle. If the brake cable becomes elongated the brake does not function correctly until it is repaired. An evaluation by a physical therapist is necessary to diagnose and treat a sprain correctly and to prevent further injury to the injury site as well as allow for speedy recovery.

3. Strains: Strains are also difficult to spot following a FOOSH. A strain differs from a sprain in that it occurs as a tearing of the tendon instead of a ligament. This can present like a sprain with swelling and bruising, but will have a few different characteristics. Tendons attach to bone on one side and a muscle on the other. Tendons therefore hurt with both passive motion, but also with active motion. Strains of the wrist and hand can cause a significant loss in function with things like writing, typing, or even just holding an object in your hand. Without intervention, this can lead to progressively worsening problems like tendonitis and carpal tunnel syndrome which may need surgical intervention if not attended to quickly.

No matter your age or fitness level please use caution to avoid these types of debilitating injuries. If you do fall, it is important to consult your health care provider. During rehabilitation we can help you reduce pain, increase strength and regain function. Please feel free to call us for more information or to schedule an appointment.