Tag Archives: Shin Splints

common running injuries

Common Running Injuries

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Running can be great for your health, but if an injury occurs never be afraid to seek help. The best treatment for injuries for runners is early management and education on self-care specific to the injury. We’ve compiled a list of common running injuries below. If you are experiencing lasting pain that affects your ability to complete your run or activities throughout your day, don’t modify your behavior – talk to your physical therapist.

IT (Iliotibial) Band Syndrome

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Usually occurs after a short period of running with sharp pain on the outside of the knee

For more information click here

Piriformis Syndrome

  • Common Causes: Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly, Poor running mechanics, Usually associated with weak hips and core.
  • Symptoms: Local pain and tightness in the buttock with possible tingling or numbness down the back of the leg. Most noted during prolonged sitting.

Shin Splints

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Lack of flexibility in calves, running on hard surfaces
  • Symptoms: Throbbing or aching pain along the front of the shin. Usually occurs during and/or following a prolonged run or walk.

For more information click here

Plantar Fasciitis

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Change in running surface, Calf tightness, increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Deep ache and/or sharp pain in the bottom of the heel. Most commonly felt in the morning or following prolonged sitting

For more information click here

Runner’s Knee

  • Common Causes: Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly, Poor running mechanics
  • Symptoms: Swelling, Aching pain behind and/ or around the kneecap, pain walking up and/or downstairs

Achilles Tendinitis

  • Common Causes: Improper footwear, Increasing mileage and/or intensity too quickly
  • Symptoms: Swelling, painful to the touch, lack of flexibility along the back of the lower leg close to the heel.

For more information click here

 

shin splints

7 Ways Physical Therapists Treat Shin Splints

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shin splints

Here are 7 ways a physical therapist can help treat pain and symptoms associated with shin splints:

Pain Reduction: The RICE principle is the first step to recovery (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Manual therapy and Kinesiotaping may also speed up recovery and reduce swelling.

Gait and Footwear Analysis: An analysis of how a person walks and runs is an important part of treatment. The wrong mechanism of walking can transmit a great deal of force through the shin to the knee and hip. In such situations, physical therapists will correct gait patterns and recommend footwear with shock-absorbing capacity.

Muscle Stretches and Strengthening: The tibial and peroneal muscles are attached to the shin and must be stretched adequately before any form of exercise. Physical therapy includes various stretches of the foot that will help stretch and warm up these muscles. Strengthening damaged muscles can also help.

 Activity Modification:  Physical therapists may suggest alternative activities to minimize stress on the shinbones. These can include swimming and cycling.

Increase Range of Motion (ROM): Exercises for the hip, knee, ankle, and foot improve blood circulation, reduce inflammation and relieve pain. A home exercise program may also be implemented.

Arch Support:  The absence or collapse of a normal foot arch can lead to shin splints. Physical therapists will recommend appropriate orthotics that can be custom-made for the patient and provide the proper amount of arch support.

Return to Sport: If you are an athlete, your therapist may tailor exercises that are specific to strengthening the areas needed to perform your sport. Modified use of your muscles may also be discussed and implemented. Return to your sport may be gradual to prevent re-injury.

To learn more about shin splints please visit our PTandMe injury center on this website by clicking here.

Physical Therapy Appointment

Training Injuries

Improper Exercise Leads to Training Injuries

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Training Injuries

The amount of physical activity you need depends on your individual fitness goals and your current fitness level.  It’s important to start within your abilities and to listen to your body’s cues in terms of pain and injury. If you experience a training injury and your body starts to ache past the point of normal muscle soreness, your body is trying to tell you that something is wrong.  For a short time, you’ll be able to push through the ache, but eventually, a breakdown will happen, and weakness and lack of flexibility will begin. Once you have a breakdown, the pain will happen and more than likely you will stop training. We want to help you before you get to a breakdown.

Training Injuries

Training injuries can be sustained from weight training, martial arts training, and sport-specific training. Common injuries include:

  • Strain/Sprain (commonly called a pulled muscle)
  • Tendinitis,  Back/Neck Pain, Tennis Elbow (Inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm extensor muscles to the outside of the elbow).
  • Carpal Tunnel: Numbness, tingling, or a dull sensation of the thumb, index finger, and middle fingers due to compression to the median nerve in your wrist.
  • Muscle Tear/Rupture
  • Separated or Dislocated Joint (shoulder, hip, knee)
  • Bursitis: Tightness in the hip or pain radiating down the lateral thigh contusion

Running Injuries

Overuse musculoskeletal injuries occur frequently in runners. Proper stretching and training principles can reduce your risk of developing a running injury.

  • Shin Splints: An overuse injury of the anterior or posterior tibialis muscles, characterized by pain or soreness down either side of the shin. Technically, this condition is tendinitis or inflammation of the tendons/muscles that attach to the tibia.
  • Achilles Tendinitis: Inflammation of the Achilles Tendon with possible thickening or thinning of the tendon and associated with pain resulting from overuse, overstretch, or poor flexibility. Hills or jumping activity will exacerbate this condition.
  • Plantar Fasciitis: Inflammation of the plantar fascia, which is the connective tissue supporting the arch of the foot. There may be point tenderness at the heel and arch.  This condition usually occurs with increased mileage or won/unsupported shoes. This condition may lead to heel spurs.

Prevent Injury While you Train

Injury can happen at any time, but there are steps you can take before during, and after your run to help prevent long-term pain. Prior to your run allow yourself at least a five-minute warm-up.  Suggestions include jumping rope, jumping jacks, light jogging, or a combination. After your warm-up takes the time to gently stretch your muscles.  Remember not to bounce.

While you are training it is important to use the proper equipment. This includes shoes for your foot type (high arch, flat foot, neutral foot), comfortable clothing, and appropriate socks. If the shoe is fitted to your foot, you will need to change running shoes every 400 miles. Even sooner if wear has occurred to the foot platform. Also make sure to change the running path often, aka different locations, terrains, surfaces, and directions.  Cross-training is also important.  We recommend using a Stairmaster or elliptical trainer, biking, swimming, yoga, Pilates. After a run, it is important to cool down with more intense stretching than the warm-up.

How Physical Therapy Can Help

TRAINING ASSESSMENTS

  • Educate on faulty or improper posture or body mechanics with training
  • Educate and help with techniques on exercises that help your muscles stretch farther. Flexibility training helps prevent cramps, stiffness, and injuries and can give a wider range of motion.
  • Correct muscle imbalances through flexibility and strength training
  • Endurance training
  • Alleviate pain
  • Correct improper movement patterns

RUNNING ASSESSMENTS

  • Modify training when you have a minor ache and pain (This does not always mean you need to stop training)
  • Get assessed for weakness and flexibility issues to address biomechanical deficits.  A therapist can videotape your running to look for biomechanical deficits that you may have while running
  • Look at foot mechanics for proper shoe type, stability, motion control, and neutral/cushion shoes

Find a PT

We have talented teams of physical therapists throughout the U.S. that can help you get the care you need.  Whether you need training injury prevention or recovery, our specialists have the skills and know-how to get you back to your workout routine or sport safely.

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shin splints

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

flu

1. Resuming Exercise After the Flu Bug
Written by the Therapy Team at the Jackson Clinics – Northern Virginia

Flu season is in full swing, and along with the regular flu, the new H1N1 virus is infecting thousands of people. Influenza can be a serious illness. Symptoms include fever, chills, headache, body aches, sore throat , runny nose, dry cough and a general feeling of exhaustion and sickness. Read more

New Year Resolution

2. The New Way to Resolve
Written by Allison Whitteberry, PTA at the Center for Physical Rehabilitation – Cascade

According to Statistic Brain, 41% of Americans usually make New Year resolutions. However, after six months, less then half of those American’s have maintained their resolutions. Read more

Shin Splints

3. What You Need to Know About Shin Splints
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, Texas

Shin splints is one of those old health terms that pop up from time to time, like “lumbago.” Lumbago refers to low back pain, which actually can be caused by different things. Read more

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis_FBsize

Definition

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), also known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is a disease of the joints in children. It can affect a child over a long period of time. JRA often starts before the child is 16 years old.

In Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the joint becomes swollen. It will make the joint painful and difficult to move. JRA can also lead to long term damage to the joint. For some, JRA can interfere with the child’s growth and development.

There are 5 major types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis:
• Pauciarticular JRA—4 or less joints are affected in the first 6 months of illness
• Polyarticular JRA—5 or more joints are affected in the first 6 months of illness
• Enthesitis associated arthritis—swelling of the tendon at the bone
• Psoriatic arthritis—associated with a skin disease called psoriasis
• Systemic onset JRA (also called Stills disease)—affects the entire body, least common type of JRA

Causes

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a problem of the immune system. The normal job of the immune system is to find and destroy items that should not be in the body, like viruses. With JRA, the immune system attacks the healthy tissue in the joint. It is not clear why this happens. The immune system problems may be caused by genetics and/or factors in the environment.

People of Hispanic American, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Native American, or African American descent are at higher risk.
Having prediabetes means that you are at high risk for developing diabetes and may already be experiencing adverse effects of elevated blood sugar levels.

Risk Factors

Girls are more likely to get JRA than boys.

There are no clear risk factors for JRA. Factors that may be associated with some types of JRA include:
• Family history of:
• Anterior uveitis with eye pain
• Inflammatory back arthritis (ankylosing spondylitis)
Inflammatory bowel disease

kids toes

Symptoms

• Symptoms may include:
• Joint stiffness, especially in the morning or after periods of rest
• Pain, swelling, tenderness, or weakness in the joints
• Fever
• Weight loss
• Fatigue or irritability
• Swelling in the eye—especially associated with eye pain, redness, or sensitivity to light
• Swollen lymph nodes
• Growth problems, such as:
• Growth that is too fast or too slow in one joint (may cause one leg or arm to be longer than the other)
• Joints grow unevenly, off to one side
• Overall growth may be slowed

Some symptoms are specific to each type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis . For example:
• Symptoms common with pauciarticular JRA include:
• Problems most often found in large joints. These joints include knees, ankles, wrists, and elbows.
• If the left-side joint is affected, then the right-side similar joint will not be affected. For example, if the right knee is affected, then the left knee will be healthy.
• May also have swelling and pain at on the tendons and ligaments attached to the bone

• Symptoms common with polyarticular JRA include:
• Problems found most often in small joints of the fingers and hands. May also affect weight-bearing joints like the knees, hips, ankles, and feet.
• Joints on both sides of the body are affected. For example, if the left hand is affected, then the right hand will also be affected.
• May also have a blood disorder called anemia. This is an abnormally low number of red blood cells.
• One type of polyarticular JRA may occur with:
• A low-grade fever
• Nodules—bumps on parts of body that receive a lot of pressure such as elbows

• Symptoms common with systemic onset JRA include:
• Some of the first signs may be a high fever, chills, and a rash on the thighs and chest. May appear on and off for weeks or months
• May have swelling in the heart, lungs, and surrounding tissues
• The lymph nodes, liver and/or spleen may become enlarged
• Children with enthesitis arthritis often have tenderness over the joint where the pelvis and spine meet.
• Children with psoriatic arthritis often have finger or toe swelling. There may also be damage on fingernails.

Often, there are remissions and flare-ups. Remission is a time when the symptoms improve or disappear. Flare-ups are times when symptoms become worse.

Diagnosis

You will be asked about your child’s symptoms. You will also be asked about your family medical history. A physical exam will be done. An eye examination may also be done to check for swelling in the eye. Your child may be referred to a specialist if JRA is suspected. The specialist is a doctor that focuses on diseases of the joints.

Images may be taken of your child’s bodily structures. This can be done with x-rays.

Your child’s bodily fluids may be tested. This can be done with:
• Blood tests
• Urine tests
• Tests of joint fluid

Treatment

Talk with your doctor about the best plan for your child. The plan will work to control swelling, relieve pain, and control joint damage. The goal is to keep a high level of physical and social function. This will help keep a good quality of life. Treatment options include the following:

Medication

There are several types of medication that may be used:

• Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)—to help swelling and pain
• Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)—to slow the progression of the disease
• Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers—to decrease swelling, pain, and joint stiffness
• Interleukin inhibitors—to reduces disease activity
• Corticosteroids through IV or by mouth—for swelling
• Steroid injections into the joint—may help relieve swelling and pain in some children

Polyarticular JRA may become inactive in children who begin medications within 2 years of onset.

Physical Therapy

Exercise is done to strengthen muscles and to help manage pain. Strong nearby muscles will support the joint. It also helps to recover the range of motion of the joints. Normal daily activities are encouraged. Non-contact sports and recreational activities may be good options. Physical activities can also help boost a child’s confidence in their physical abilities.

Physical therapy may be needed. This will help to make the muscles strong and keep the joints moving well.

Maintenance Devices

Splints and other devices may be recommended. They may be worn to keep bone and joint growth normal. Some joints may get stuck in a bent position. These devices can help prevent this.

Prevention

There is no known way to prevent JRA.

by Jacquelyn Rudis

RESOURCES:
American College of Rheumatology
http://www.rheumatology.org

Arthritis Foundation
http://www.arthritis.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
The Arthritis Society
http://www.arthritis.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:

Hofer MF, Mouy R, et al. Juvenile idiopathic arthritides evaluated prospectively in a single center according to the Durban criteria. J Rheumatol. 2001. 28:1083.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) enthesitis related. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 16, 2015. Accessed December 21, 2015.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) oligoarticular. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 16, 2015. Accessed December 21, 2015.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) polyarticular. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 16, 2015. Accessed December 21, 2015.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) systemic-onset. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 16, 2015. Accessed December 21, 2015.

JAMA Patient Page. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. JAMA. 2005;294:1722.

Petty RE, Southwood TR, et al. Revision of the proposed classification criteria for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Durban, 1997. J Rheumatol.1998; 25:1991.

2/5/2013 DynaMed’s Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: De Benedetti F, Brunner HI, Ruperto N, et al. Randomized trial of tocilizumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. N Eng J Med. 2012;367(25):2385-95.

2/24/2014 DynaMed’s Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Limenis E, Grosbein HA, et al. The relationship between physical activity levels and pain in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. J Rheumatol. 2014 Feb;41(2):345-351.

9/2/2014 DynaMed’s Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Guzman J, Oen K, et al. The outcomes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children managed with contemporary treatments: results from the ReACCh-Out cohort. Ann Rheum Dis. 2014 May 19.

Last reviewed December 2015 by Kari Kassir, MD Last Updated: 12/20/2014

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

Fear the Walking Dead

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160865169 (1)

We all know the zombie apocalypse is inevitable, but have you ever stopped to wonder just how far your limbs can carry you without sustaining injury, assuming they weren’t eaten during the unfortunate event that caused you to turn. Walkers quite frankly do a lot of walking; most of it is rather aimless but they cover a lot of distance especially in a herd.

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