Tag Archives: Knees

physical therapy knee pain

How Physical Therapy Helps Knee Rehabilitation

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

PT&Me Knee Rehabilitation

Physical therapists can provide more than pre/post surgical knee rehabilitation for patients experiencing knee pain.

What Causes Knee Pain?
The knee is a relatively simple joint required to do a complicated job…to provide flexible mobility while bearing considerable weight. While walking down the street, our knees bear three to five times our body weight. When the knee is overstressed in sports or in everyday activities, these structures can break down — and a knee injury occurs.

Common Knee Problems Seen by Our Physical Therapists:

  • Strain / Sprain
  • Arthritis Pain
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Ligament Sprains
  • ACL Tears
  • Tendinitis (ie: Patellar, Pes Anserinus)
  • Chondromalacia Patella
  • Patellofemoral Syndrome / Knee Pain
  • Pre / Post Operative Therapy

How Physical Therapy Provides Knee Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation acutely after knee surgery or a knee injury primarily centers around decreasing swelling in the knee joint. Even a small amount of fluid inhibits the quadriceps muscle on the front of knee by slowing the signal for movement traveling from the brain to the muscle. Manual techniques to decrease muscle spasm and improve length tension relationships of soft tissue are also incorporated. Gradually, exercises to increase strength, range of motion and functional mobility are introduced.

Treatments Offered Include:

  • Comprehensive evaluation with an emphasis on determining the source of the problem
  • Individualized and specific exercise programs
  • Manual therapy (hands-on treatment)
  • Modalities as needed
  • Work and sport specific simulations
  • Progressive home program to help restore independence and self-management

Knee Rehabilitation Goals:

  • Reduce Pain
  • Improve Mobility
  • Movement Awareness/Gait Training
  • Functional Strength
  • Patient Education

For more information on knee injuries visit our PT & Me Knee Injury Center page by clicking here.

The PT & Me Injury Center goes over diagnoses on how physical therapists treat specific injuries.

To find or search for a local participating PT & Me physical therapy clinic in your local area please click here.

total knee replacement

Physical Therapy Following a Total Knee Replacement

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

There are over 600,000 total knee replacements done each year in the U.S. As the workforce ages and as obesity levels continue to rise, this number is expected to increase.

Candidates for a knee replacement include patients experiencing difficulty doing simple daily activities, including walking or going down steps, and where conventional treatments are no longer helping. Common causes that lead to a replacement include pain with simple ADL’s (activities of daily living), pain at rest, chronic swelling, inflammation not improving with medication, knee deformity, knee stiffness, or trauma to the joint. When you are scheduled for a total knee replacement, ask to see your physical therapist for a pre¬surgical exercise and stretching program. This will help your knee recover its range of motion and strength.

Surgery consists of resurfacing the knee’s damaged and worn joint surfaces with artificial parts made of metal or plastic. Most patients are in the hospital for an average of 3¬5 days. And more than 90 percent of people report significant decrease in pain and improvement in ability to perform ADL’s within one month after surgery. Currently, many knee replacements are lasting 20 years or more with appropriate activity modification. One of the most important factors in success after a total knee replacement is follow up with physical therapy and a lifelong exercise program. Physical therapy typically starts during the hospital stay with the goals being to get the individual up and walking decreasing swelling in the knee and increasing knee ROM (range of motion). Upon hospital discharge, patients either go home and receive home physical therapy for one to two weeks, or to an extended care facility to continue their therapy.

Typically, patients need outpatient physical therapy after therapy at home, which usually begins two to four weeks after surgery. Outpatient physical therapy is recommended for three times a week for up to three months. Therapy goals initially are to reduce swelling and pain, and improve knee range of motion in both directions. To achieve these goals, treatment may consist of soft tissue massage to increase circulation and decrease swelling, stretching to improve flexibility, patellar mobilization, range of motion exercises, and modalities such as ice and electrical stimulation to help decrease pain and swelling. Physical therapy will progress to lower extremity strengthening exercises, balance activities, and fine tuning the gait pattern. Various activities and techniques will be used to improve strength, balance, and gait. As patients reach the end of their course of physical therapy, a personalized home exercise program is developed with the focus on independence with all ADL’s and returning to activities such as walking, swimming, dancing, golf, and biking. It is important for patients to stay active and maintain strength, flexibility, and endurance.

PT News

like what you see? share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics.

179569310

1. Time for Summer Athletes to Be Mindful of Their Knees 

Written by John Mishock, PT, DPT, DC, Owner of Mishock Physical Therapy & Associates

As the summer heat starts up more people are lacing up their sneakers, grabbing their I-pods, and hitting the road. Running and power walking outside are very popular forms of exercise and while they both have excellent health benefits, physical problems can still arise. Even running less than five miles a week can cause a person to develop Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) which is also known as “runner’s knee.” Runner’s knee is a common dysfunction that plagues runners of all ability levels. The major symptom of runner’s knee is pain under or around the knee cap (patella). The pain is felt not only when running but also while walking up and down the stairs, kneeling, squatting, and sitting with a bent knee for a long period of time.  Often victims of knee pain find themselves forced to take time off from work, school, and avoid athletic or recreational activities. Read More ->

ThinkstockPhotos-177257625

 

2. Fit in Fitness

Written by the therapy Team at ARC Physical Therapy+

It can be hard to find time to workout during the week, especially when we feel as though we’re running in a million different directions as it is. However, the more we move, the better we feel. So, it’s really in our best interest to be as active as possible on a regular basis. Here are some tips to help you incorporate physical fitness into your daily routine: Read More ->

 

ThinkstockPhotos-465042331

3. The Importance of Sleep for your Body
Written by the therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy & Sports Rehab

Sleep is more than something you do when you’re tired. Sleep is a vital part of growth, healing, and general well-being. Too often sleep is sacrificed for the sake of watching something on TV, spending time online, or being out with friends, but this sacrifice takes a heavy toll on the body in ways we don’t always recognize. If you’re having trouble sleeping, perhaps it is some of your habits that are preventing you from having the best night ever. Here are a few key things you can do in order to get a proper night’s rest: Read More ->

To Find a physical or occupational therapy clinic near you click here