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snow shoveling safety tips

Snow Shoveling Safety Tips

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snow shoveling safety tips

Snow Shoveling: A common cause of soft tissue injuries & low back pain

An average of 11,500 people are treated at emergency rooms for injuries and medical emergencies related to snow shoveling each year, according to a report released Jan. 17 by the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.  Data from between 1990 and 2006 shows the majority of the injuries were soft-tissue injuries, with the lower back being affected 34 percent of the time. Acute musculoskeletal exertion was the cause of injury in 54 percent of the cases, followed by slips and falls (20 percent) and being struck by a snow shovel (15 percent).  Study authors recommended individuals talk to their doctor before shoveling snow, particularly those who do not exercise regularly, have a medical condition or are in a high-risk group. They also recommended alternative snow removal methods.

Clearing snow & Ice

Clearing snow and ice from driveways and sidewalks is hard work. To prevent injuries, follow these safety tips from the National Safety Council, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and other prevention organizations.

  • Dress warmly, paying special attention to feet, hands, nose,
    and ears.
  • Avoid shoveling snow if you are out of shape. If you have a history of heart trouble, do not shovel snow unless your doctor says it’s okay.
  • Do light warm-up exercises before shoveling and take
    frequent breaks.
  • If possible, push snow in front of you. If you have to lift it, pick up small amounts and lift with your legs, not your back. Do not toss snow over your shoulder or to the side.

Use ergonomic lifting technique

Whenever possible, push the snow to one side rather than lifting it. When lifting the snow shovel is necessary, make sure to use ergonomic lifting techniques.

  • Always face towards the object you intend to lift (ie have your shoulders and hips both squarely facing it)
  • Bend at the hips, not the low back, and push the chest out, pointing forward. Then, bend your knees and lift with your leg muscles, keeping your back straight
  • Keep your loads light and do not lift an object that is too heavy
    for you
  • If you must lift a shovel full, grip the shovel with one hand as close to the blade as comfortably possible and the other hand on the handle (handle and arm length will vary the technique)
  • Avoid twisting the back to move your object to its new location – always pivot your whole body to face the new direction
  • Keep the heaviest part of the object close to your body at your center of gravity – do not extend your arms to throw the snow
  • Walk to the new location to deposit the item rather than reaching or tossing

Video provided by the Center for Physical Rehabilitation with locations throughout Grand Rapids, MI. Check them out online here.

snow shoveling safety tips PTandMe

SENIORS NOTE:

Whenever possible, avoid shoveling snow first thing in the morning. If this is not an option, a proper indoor warm-up will prepare the body for additional activity. Jogging in place, or using a treadmill or stationary bike for 5-10 minutes are options for safely raising the heart rate while in a neutral temperature. As with any exercise, drinking lots of fluids will help maintain electrolyte balance and prevent fluid loss.

 

For more cold weather safety tips to keep you out of harm’s way this winter check the articles below!

Staying Warm in Winter PTandMe  Winter Safety PTandMe  

 

Need help from a physical therapist?

We work with expert teams around the country to make sure you have access to the best care possible.

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Vestibular Physical Therapy

Vestibular Physical Therapy

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Vestibular Physical Therapy

Vestibular Dysfunction

It is estimated that 35% of adults aged 40 years or older in the U.S. have experienced some sort of vestibular dysfunction — approximately 69 million Americans. Many people who suffer from acute dizzy spells can be helped by physical therapy. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by a brief episode of vertigo (spinning) every time your head moves into a specific position. Common causes for this disorder are trauma to the head (concussion, motor vehicle accident, etc.) and acute infection, but frequently the cause is unknown. Patients usually complain of a spinning sensation being provoked by lying down, rolling over in bed, bending over, or looking up. Common activities that can provoke this sensation include getting out of bed, gardening, washing hair in the shower, and going to the dentist or beauty parlor.

vertigo diagram

Common Symptoms

  • Vertigo: The perception of movement/spinning, either of the self or the environment
  • Dizziness: General term that describes light-headedness, floating sensation, or faintness
  • Imbalance: Disequilibrium is a feeling of being off-balance or a loss of equilibrium

 

Uncommon Symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Blurred vision
  • Anxiety
  • Lack of coordination
  • Difficulties with memory and concentration
  • Headaches/neck pain

 

How Do You Know if You Need Vestibular Therapy?

80% of older adults over the age of 65 have experienced dizziness with 50% being due to Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV).

  • Do you feel unsteady?
  • Do you lose your balance and fall?
  • Do you feel like you are falling, the room is spinning, or get dizzy when you lay down?
  • Do you like you are moving when you are standing or sitting still?
  • Do you feel light-headed?
  • Do you have blurred vision?
  • Do you ever feel disoriented, such as losing your sense of time or where you are?
  • Or if you’ve been diagnosed with BPPV, labyrinthitis, vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s syndrome, migraine-related dizziness, cervicogenic dizziness

Video provided by Advance Rehabilitation (GA)

What to Expect from Vestibular Physical Therapy?

Our goal for vestibular physical therapy patients is to decrease feelings of vertigo and dizziness, improve balance, posture control, gaze stability, overall endurance, and conditioning, and increase safety.

We use exercises that provide small, controlled, and repeated “doses” of the movements and activities that provoke dizziness to de-sensitize and fine-tune the brain. Physical therapists provide comprehensive Balance and Vestibular Rehabilitation. They perform specific treatment protocols for specific diagnoses, with a focus on alleviation of symptoms and return of function. Treatment for vestibular rehabilitation may include, but is not limited to:

  • Patient Education
  • Home Exercise Program
  • Repositioning Maneuvers
  • Habituation Exercises
  • Balance Exercises
  • Conditioning Exercises
  • Functional Activities

 

When you Go for a Vestibular Physical Therapy Visit

  • Wear comfortable clothes that allow you to move freely
  • Bring a list of your current medications, especially those prescribed for your s/s
  • You may experience dizziness or an increase in symptoms initially. If possible, have someone with you for the first couple of appointments to assist you home if needed

For more information about vestibular disorders and vertigo, please don’t hesitate to reach out to any of our highly trained teams of physical therapists nationwide. We are here and ready to help.

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Information for this post provided by Agility Spine & Sports Physical Therapy (locations throughout Tucson, AZ)

Physical Therapy for Seniors in Retirement Homes

Physical Therapy for Adults Living in Retirement Communities

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Physical Therapy for Seniors in Retirement Homes

Physical therapy for adults in retirement communities is common. Physical therapy programs can restore a great degree of functionality and bring independence to an elderly after he/she has sustained an impairment either from some chronic condition, injury, or illness. It also works when a person is recovering from surgery.

Physical therapy can be used to manage injury, deformity, or disease using physical methods rather than surgery or drugs. Typical methods include stretching, strengthening through exercise, and manual therapy. Today most outpatient physical therapy clinics and assisted living facilities for disabled adults would offer these as part of their services.

Under physical therapy, a trained therapist will evaluate and assess a person’s condition and accordingly devise a plan to suit their needs. The goal is to restore mobility and prevent future injuries. Treatment plans are usually long-term that keep in mind the degree of independence to which a person was accustomed and aim to bring that back.

Common Types of Physical Therapies for Seniors

Orthopedic Physical Therapy

When needing physical therapy for adults living in retirement communities, outpatient PT clinics offer an array of valuable services. Injuries related to the musculoskeletal system are treated by orthopedic physical therapists. Seniors recovering from orthopedic surgery are also ideal for undergoing this form of therapy. It aims to restore the functioning of joints, bone, muscles, ligaments, and tendons.

Seniors who have a hard time balancing or have reduced physical strength can also benefit from regular physical therapy sessions. It can help seniors in improving and maintaining better endurance and muscle tone enabling them to live more freely and independently. The goal is to decrease their risk of falling and accidental muscle/bone damage.

Patients suffering from post-intensive care syndrome can also benefit from physical therapy. Post-ICU physical therapy programs help patients get back into their daily routines and activities by working with them to reduce the effects of muscle loss and weakness.

Trained therapists who work at outpatient clinics and assisted living for adults with disabilities often create restorative therapy programs for the residents. These programs are led by nursing staff and caregivers with the specific needs of the patient in mind. The nursing staff prescribes certain exercises that improve strength and range of motion.

Geriatric Physical Therapy

The main emphasis under geriatric therapy is on the needs of the aging individual. Common conditions that receive treatment are – joint replacement, balance disorders, cancer, osteoporosis, and arthritis. Special programs are devised to improve fitness levels, reduce pain, and restore mobility to the maximum range.

Aquatic or Hydrotherapy

Aquatic therapy is beneficial for a few key reasons. Water decreases the gravity placed on weak limbs unable to bear much weight. This makes it easier for a patient to move, with less stress on joints, muscles, and bones. Physical therapists also utilize water to surround the patient’s body and help blood circulation in the legs. This can also reduce swelling in the patient’s ankles and feet. As the swelling decreases, the range of motion can increase.

Neurological Physical Therapy

This therapy is slightly different from all the other therapies in that it focuses on restoring brain health. Neurological physical therapy is best for the elderly who have neurological conditions like ALS, Dementia, or Parkinson’s. Those who have sustained some kind of brain injury can also benefit from it. A neurological physical therapist trains the patient to adapt to mobility, visual, and muscle loss impairments and balance issues to make their daily living as easy as possible.

Occupational Therapy

The focus of occupational therapy is on fine motor movements and hygiene-related tasks. Ideal candidates to receive this therapy are the elderly with arthritis or those who have suffered a stroke. These conditions can affect a person’s mobility and movement. An occupational therapist teaches ways to handle daily tasks with the least difficulty. It also focuses on incorporating adaptive equipment to help a person regain independence which eventually boosts the elderly’s body awareness and self-esteem.

Cardiopulmonary physical therapy

Cardiopulmonary therapy works best for individuals who have had a heart attack or suffer from some kind of heart condition. Common pulmonary conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease can also benefit from this therapy. It helps to restore functional independence and endurance.

Speech-Language Therapy

The focus of this therapy is on the mouth and language-related concerns; and not just on speech as one may assume. Seniors who have a hard time chewing food or swallowing can benefit greatly from speech-language therapy. Additionally, seniors with short-term memory loss should also work with a speech-language therapist. The focus of this therapy is on cognitive issues, language deficit, and judgment concerns that are often a result of stroke or dementia.

Respiratory Therapy

Respiratory therapy is for seniors who struggle with breathing issues. It’s not uncommon for a common cold to sometimes turn into pneumonia in an occasional elderly. This can take a toll on the breathing quality. A respiratory therapist uses tapping and massage lessons to loosen the mucus which encourages easy breathing.

 

How Physical Therapy Benefits Seniors

Can manage chronic pain

Most seniors suffer from conditions like osteoporosis, arthritis; and as a result, suffer from pain almost every day. Studies tell that almost all elderly over the age of 65 have some degree of arthritis in their spine no matter whether symptoms persist or not. Physical therapy can preserve strength and joint health so that the onset of symptoms is delayed. If a person already has arthritis, via physical therapy they can learn therapeutic methods to reduce the level of pain and everyday discomfort.

Can significantly reduce the risk of falls

Falls happen to be the leading cause of bone and head-related injuries/accidents. Also, one fall often leads to multiple falls. Physical therapy can ensure stability and strength via balancing techniques to prevent future falls.

Reduces dependence on pain medications

Physical therapy is often more effective in restoring balance and managing pain than medications prescribed by the doctor. When performed properly, it can produce almost the same kind of result in treating spine-related issues as surgery.

Reduces risk of injury

With advancing age, a person loses flexibility and muscle strength making them more prone to injuries. As part of physical therapy, a person learns several extension exercises that preserve flexibility and maintain balance to prevent falls and ensure correct posture.

Helps to regain independence and aid a healthy lifestyle

Many of the old age injuries and illnesses are due to lack of activity and mobility. Physical therapy programs incorporate various exercises to keep the elderly strong and fit. In this way, it enables them to complete everyday tasks all the while maintaining a healthy weight.

Outpatient Physical Therapy and Telehealth

Thanks to the transformation in digital technologies; seniors don’t always need to subscribe to an inpatient facility. They can work with an outpatient clinic wherein they receive physical therapy and go back to their home.

Outpatient clinics often use telehealth for physical therapy (online appointments) to work with patients that may not yet feel comfortable going into the clinic. These online telehealth appointments are more than a consultation. It is a:

  • Is a full therapy visit
  • Is a private, secure, and compliant way to receive care
  • Sessions can be done on a computer, tablet, or phone
  • Appointments are accessed on a user-friendly platform

Telehealth is a great option for seniors that are in need of care but are unable to make it into the clinic.

Final Thoughts

If you or someone you love needs physical therapy for adults living in retirement communities to recover from an illness, weakness, or injury, talk to your local physical therapist or primary care provider, and ask for more information.

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winter injuries

Winter Is A Great Time To Take Care Of Injuries

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winter injuries

As Mother Nature keeps bringing on the winter wind, now is the time to think about spring and summer!   Waiting to take care of these injuries when the first fair day arrives can be too late. No one wants to lose weeks to months of fun in the sun because of a lengthy rehabilitation. By taking care of these injuries now, you can have plenty of time to enjoy your favorite activities in the best kind of weather.

BACK INJURIES
From picking up leaves in the fall to shoveling snow, low back injuries are common this time of year. While a simple backache may dissipate in a day or two after shoveling out after a winter storm, if it lingers longer than a week, chances are it’s not going away on its own. Waiting until the first round of golf to find out that you can’t complete the backswing due to low back pain not only severely hinders the golf game, but can also severely hinder the recovery. The more chronic the pain is, the longer it takes to eliminate the pain once treatment is started. Pain management becomes more complex; muscle strength atrophies; and bad spinal mechanics become a difficult habit to break. Fortunately, from a simple muscle strain to a herniated disc, all low back injuries have the opportunity to be conservatively managed quickly if treatment is sought out quickly.

JOINT REPLACEMENTS
Fear of slipping and falling is often the biggest rationale people wait to have their much-needed joint replacement surgeries. While a legitimate concern, the process of recovery and length of time for recovery is often overlooked by patients. For a typical total hip replacement, it can take 12 weeks or more to feel “normal” again. For a total knee replacement, that timeline can extend to six months. By waiting until spring to have the surgery, patients forego their fun-in-the-sun for recovery and rehabilitation. However, if that same surgery were elected to be performed in the late fall or winter, then plenty of warm weather is still left in the year to enjoy the capabilities of the new joint. To address the fear of falling, simple precautions can easily be taken to minimize the risk of slip and fall in the snow following the surgery. As an added benefit, patients in the winter often experience less swelling than those in the summer, as a result of the reduced humidity.

ROTATOR CUFF REPAIRS
Similar to joint replacement surgery, shoulder surgeries are often avoided in the winter due to the fear of falling. However, again, similar to joint replacement surgeries, the length of time for recovery from this surgery is grossly underestimated. Returning to swing a golf club, throwing a ball, or even swimming laps in a pool will take a
minimum of 12 weeks of physical therapy. While a neighborhood teenager may need to be hired to shovel the snow, the winter hibernation season is an idea for resting and mending from a rotator cuff repair surgery. After completing a comprehensive rehabilitation program with your physical therapist, you will be ready to tee off with your regular golf league and enjoy your planned summer vacation without restrictions.

SPORTS EVALUATIONS AND CONDITIONING
Winter is not only the time to remedy nagging injuries, but it’s the perfect time to prepare for the athletic season ahead. Whether you are a runner, a golfer, or an over-40 league softball player, preparing for the upcoming outdoor activities can help prevent future nagging injuries. The “off-season” is the best time to undergo performance and biomechanical evaluations with a physical therapist trained in motion analysis. From this evaluation, deficiencies can be addressed and a plan for improvement implemented. Furthermore, winter is a perfect time to re-strengthen after the holidays and to condition yourself into the shape you need to be in in order to enjoy those outdoor activities and minimize the concern for strains and sprains. In just a few simple visits to physical therapy, conditioning tips and technique changes can help make the warm weather even more rewarding and enjoyable.

The winter is long and it would be unfortunate to miss enjoying any of the warm, sunny weather heading our way in a few months. Addressing lingering winter injuries now will help ensure a fun spring and summer without restrictions. Always discuss your medical options with your doctor first. Then, call your physical therapist to help accelerate your recovery and be a picture of health.

PT News PTandMe

PT News December 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout November & December 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

blood clots while traveling

1. Blood Clots: Don’t Bring Them on Your Holiday Trip

Written by The Jackson Clinics with multiple locations throughout Northern Virginia and Maryland.

The coming holidays and winter breaks mean traveling for many people. But spending more than four hours in a car, bus, train or plane leaves you at moderate risk for blood clots in your legs caused by a lack of circulation. These can sometimes break free and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism. The longer you are immobile, the greater your risk of developing a blood clot.  Read more

 

Physical Therapy for Cancer Patients

2. How Physical Therapy Can Benefit Cancer Patients

Written by Wright Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Idaho. 

When faced with cancer, having the right medical and support team becomes exponentially more critical. Oncology teams skillfully lead the way in managing a myriad of symptoms and complications that arise. In conjunction with oncology teams, physical therapy is an integral part of healthcare as they help patients regain their functional strength and balance. Physical therapists are serviceable in managing edema and a multitude of other cancer-related dysfunctions in addition. Read more

 

Physical Therapy

3. Are You Missing Out on Free Physical Therapy?

Written by Momentum Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with locations throughout Greater San Antonio.

Have you met your annual insurance deductible? If you have, it’s a great time to come in to see your physical therapist! Many find they can access physical therapy at low or no cost after their deductible has been met. Most deductibles reset on January 1st, so NOW is the time to take advantage of your access to physical therapy.   Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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physical therapy telehealth

Now Providing Online Physical & Occupational Therapy Care

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physical therapy telehealth

Our partnering clinics are now providing physical and/or occupational therapy care!

There are now two ways to help patients recover from injury:

  • In Person:We are still open and welcoming patients to receive the care they need in our clinic. Click here for more information about the precautions we are taking in the clinics to keep you safe.
  • Online Through Telehealth: Our partnering therapists can still complete a visit for patients that are unable to make it into the clinic.  They will use both VIDEO and AUDIO so that they can have two way communication during these physical and/or occupational therapy visits.

In order to make your telehealth appointment a success, here are the things you will need access to: 

  • Internet access
  • A device with a camera (computer, phone, tablet) that has access to email
  • Space to exercise

online physical therapy

For more information about online physical and occupational therapy services please contact your clinic directly.

physical therapy near me

*Not all locations may be set-up for online appointments. 

reducing holiday stress

Jingled Nerves, Jingled Nerves, Jingled All The Way: Reducing Holiday Stress

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reducing holiday stress

Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed with to-do lists. This year find ways to enjoy yourself and get rid of the stress that’s keeping you up at night with our quick tips! Reducing holiday stress is the key to enjoying the holidays – so what are you waiting for? We have some great ideas!

Plan Ahead and Prioritize
Sit down with your family and come up with a list of ideas on how you would like to spend the holidays. Decide which ideas would be the most stressful in terms of cost, time, and energy and cross them off your list.

Choose the things that you enjoy and can accomplish realistically. Prioritize the events that matter most to you and your family, and set a budget.

Clarify Your Values
Reflect on the way you spend the holidays. What is most important to you—spending more money on your loved ones or spending more time with them? Do you believe the idea that “love-equals-money”? Are you driven by perfectionism and competitive gift? Do you take the time to experience joy and the true meaning of the season? What other ways could you show your love? Do you enjoy shopping or is it a hassle each year? Is gift giving really meaningful or do you end up with lots of clutter and gifts that you do not really need? What, if anything, would you like to change about how you celebrate the holidays? Answering these and other questions can help to clarify your values for the holiday season, and result in a much more relaxed and meaningful time.

Simplify
Here are some tips to simplify your holiday challenges:
• If you dislike traffic jams, crowded shopping malls and parking lots, and waiting in long lines, try shopping online.
• Plan to finish all of your gift shopping well in advance of the holidays.
• Wrap your presents early.
• Cut back on your baking. Do not bake 10 different types of cookies. Make your goodies ahead of time and freeze them so you will have less to do during busy times. If you are looking for dessert variety, try organizing a cookie exchange with your family and friends.
• Take care of several errands in one trip, rather than making multiple trips.
• Consider drawing names rather than exchanging gifts with all your family members and friends.
• Limit the number of social events you host or attend.
• Delegate tasks to family members. Do not feel that you must be responsible for everything.

Take Care of Your Health
You will be at your best and more resistant to stress and possible infection if you take good care of your health. Here are some suggestions:
• Get plenty of sleep each night (at least 8 hours).
• Exercise regularly.
• Eat a well-balanced diet. It is okay to have some goodies at a party, but a few extra calories here and there can add up to holiday weight gain—slowing you down.
• Limit alcohol intake. Alcohol depresses the nervous system and can cause fatigue and sleep disturbances.
• Take time to unwind. Take a hot bath or find a quiet place to enjoy some time alone each day. Even a few minutes can make a difference.
• Stick to your healthy routine as much as possible.

time Xmas

Don’t Forget the Joy
Try to celebrate the holidays in new and creative ways. Remember that you are not a “human doing” but a human being! Enjoy the uniqueness of each special person in your life and enjoy the time you can spend just being together. Seek out the simple joys of the holiday season with your friends and family. Taking a walk around the neighborhood to look at holiday decorations, singing carols, playing games, or just talking are easy and healthy ways to positively experience the holidays.

Adjust Your Expectations
We get a lot of messages about how things should be at the holidays. We have been programmed to believe that the holidays are a time of great joy, love, and togetherness. The truth is that many people may be having a hard time during the holidays, whether they are grieving the loss of a loved one, having financial problems, or experiencing difficulty with their family relationships. Sadness is common during this time of year, which is often referred to as “holiday blues.”

One way to reduce stress and the “holiday blues” is to keep your expectations realistic. Things will likely not be perfect, no matter how hard you try. There may be disappointments, arguments, and frustrations, in addition to excitement and joy. Try to go with the flow, allowing for inevitable delays and setbacks. Do not have the expectation of perfection from yourself, as well as from others around you.

If you are grieving a loss or feeling sad and lonely, accept these feelings. Do not feel guilty about your sadness or try to force yourself to be happy just because it is the holiday season. If this is a difficult time for you, adopt a nurturing attitude toward yourself. Do not be afraid to seek support from family, friends, or a counselor. If the holidays are a lonely time for you, find ways to increase your social support or consider volunteering your services to those in need. Helping others in need is a wonderful way to celebrate the message of the holiday season, as well as an excellent way to help you feel better.

by Amy Scholten, MPH

En Español

RESOURCES:
The American Institute of Stress
http://www.stress.org/

American Psychological Association
http://www.psych.org/

123 Ways to Reduce Stress and Relax – Health Grinder
https://healthgrinder.com/ways-to-reduce-stress/ 

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada
http://www.anxietycanada.ca/

Canadian Mental Health Association
http://www.cmha.ca/bins/index.asp

REFERENCES:
North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension website. Available at: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Sleep, sleepiness, and alcohol use. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website. Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh25-2/101-109.htm.

University of Maryland website. Available at: http://www.umm.edu. Accessed December 3, 2002.

Weil Cornell psychiatrist offers advice for reducing holiday stress. Cornell University website. Available at: http://www.med.cornell.edu/. Accessed June 10, 2007

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

ladder safety

Ladder Safety

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ladder safety

As we start to put up our holiday decorations, it’s important to remember that safety comes first.
We’ve collected a few tips on proper ladder safety usage to help you stay safe this holiday season!

LadderSafety

  • If you feel tired or dizzy or are prone to losing your balance, stay off the ladder.
  • Wear clean slip-resistant shoes. Shoes with leather soles are not ideal for ladder use as they are not considered sufficiently slip-resistant.
  • When the ladder is set-up for use, it should be placed on firm level ground and without any type of slippery condition present at either the base or top support points.
  • Ladders should not be placed in front of closed doors that can open toward the ladder. The door should be blocked open, locked, or guarded.
  • Before using a ladder, inspect it to confirm it is in good working condition.
  • Ladders with loose or missing parts should not be used.
  • Rickety ladders that sway or lean to the side should not be used.
  • Make sure you’re using the right size ladder for the job.
  • The length of the ladder should be sufficient so that the climber does not have to stand on the top rung or step.
  • Only one person at a time should be on a ladder unless the ladder is specifically designed for more than one climber (such as a Trestle Ladder).
  • Never jump or slide down from a ladder or climb more than one rung/step at a time.

Ladders can be extremely hazardous when they aren’t used properly, so please take advantage of the safety precautions above. If you find yourself in pain, please come see us. We can help get rid of your pain and back to the holiday traditions and events that you look forward to. It’s our job to make sure you feel great and ready to celebrate!

Looking for a physical therapist to help you recover from a ladder injury?

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More information about ladder safety can be found in our Newsletter

Avoiding Ladder Hazards

Looking for more holiday survival tips? We have them here for you!

  Lifting Safety Tips PTandMe  elf injuries physical therapy PTandMe

 

 

Lifting Safety Tips PTandMe

Avoid Back Pain with These 8 Lifting Safety Tips

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Lifting Safety Tips PTandMe

During the holidays, back injuries become more prevalent as people maneuver themselves up and down ladders and stairways while carrying or lifting heavy objects. A little bit of lifting safety can go a long way to keeping your holiday season bright.

1. SIZE UP THE LOAD

Check to ensure the load is stable and balanced.

2. PLAN THE JOB

Consider all possibilities. Is the path clear? What is the weight of the load? How much stress will be placed on your back? Is there traffic, a tripping hazard, a doorway to go through, or a stairway to go up or down? Avoid carrying an object that requires two hands to hold, either up or especially down, a flight of stairs.

3. ESTABLISH A BASE OF SUPPORT

Use a wide, balanced stance with one foot in front of the other. Make sure you have firm footing and that your feet are a shoulder-width apart. This staggered stance gives you the stability of not falling over and being able to secure the load.

4. BEND YOUR KNEES, KEEP YOUR HEELS OFF OF THE FLOOR AND GET AS CLOSE TO THE OBJECT AS POSSIBLE.

Always lift with your legs and not your back.

Proper Lifting Technique PTandMe

5. BE CERTAIN YOU WILL BE ABLE TO MAINTAIN A HOLD ON THE OBJECT WITHOUT HAVING TO ADJUST YOUR GRIP LATER.

You can use gloves to help maintain an adequate grip, but don’t rely on gloves because they can de-sensitize the fingers making you unable to feel the object.

6. LIFT GRADUALLY

Lift gradually with your legs without using jerky motions.

7. KEEP THE LOAD CLOSE TO PREVENT ARCHING YOUR LOWER BACK.

As you begin the lift, tighten your stomach muscles, and keep your head and shoulders up. The closer the load is to your spine, the less force will be placed on your back.

8. PIVOT

Don’t twist. Move your feet in the direction of the lift. This will eliminate the need to twist at the waist.

Whether at home or at work safe lifting practices can keep your back healthy and safe. Before lifting heavy objects decide how you will lift carry & place the item before you pick it up. If you are experiencing persistent pain, please contact us. We want to help you to be at your best this holiday season.

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PT News PTandMe

PT News November 2020

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PT News PTandMe

This time in PT News we recap what our clinics have been posting throughout October & November 2020. We are excited to bring you current physical therapy based posts featuring published articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

Holiday Home Exercise Program

1. 15 Minute Holiday Home Exercise Program

Created by Mishock Physical Therapy with 7 Convenient locations throughout Montgomery, Berks, and Chester Counties.

The goal of the Mishock Physical Therapy Holiday Home Exercise program is to promote the development of the individual’s ability to become strong in fundamental movement patterns (relative maximum strength) that are critical to improving function and preventing injury. The scientifically based program trains the body’s major muscle groups by focusing on the core, upper, and lower body strength through fundamental movement patterns. Read more

 

Stretching

2. 9 Ways Stretching Can Improve your Health and Wellness

Written by Cornerstone Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy practice with multiple locations throughout Ohio. 

Is stretching part of your daily life? If not, it should be. Stretching is a great way to start your day and it comes with a wide range of benefits. Don’t know where to start? Don’t fret! Our licensed physical therapists can help you create a stretching plan that will work best for you. To find out more about how daily stretches and improve your quality of life! Read more

 

breast cancer physical therapy

3. Recovery During and After Cancer Treatment: A Therapist’s Role

Written by Rebound Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group in Bend, OR, and surrounding areas.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and it also is National Physical Therapy Month. As a physical therapist and certified lymphedema therapist, I am very passionate about working with patients during their journey with breast cancer.   Physical therapists (and occupational therapists) play an important role in the recovery after breast cancer treatments.  These treatments can include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.  Patients can experience side effects from treatments that can impact their daily lives.  Read more

 

Find these locations and others to start feeling better today!

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