Tag Archives: certified hand therapy

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics!

1. No Equipment Outdoor Workouts
Written by the Therapy Team at Momentum Physical Therapy – San Antonio, TX

We have an idea you might not hear often- take a break from the gym. How? Well, instead of being inside, take your work out ‘out’ and sweat outdoors without any equipment at all. Read more

2. Sensitive Pain
Written by the Ryan Beck, MPT at Oregon Spine and Physical Therapy – Eugene, OR

One of my favorite analogies!! I have used this on several patients and I’ll never forget a few years ago working with a particular patient when this analogy popped into my mind and I’ve used it so many times to help people who are having a lot of pain. Read more

3. Certified Hand Therapists: Helping People Live Their Lives
Written by Jan Taylor, OT Fellowship Director and OT Resource Coordinator at ARC Physical Therapy Plus – Overland Park, KS

The hand is so critical to every minute of our daily lives that when you lose function of it your world is turned upside down. Read more

hand therapy week PTandMe

ASHT: Hand Therapy Awareness Week

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hand therapy week PTandMe

Prevent hand and wrist injuries while cooking. Professional hand therapists promote wrist and hand health in the kitchen.

USE THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB
Use easy-to-grip versions of tools like spoons, knives and bottle/can openers to decrease the stress on your hands and use scissors to open bags (or packages) instead of your thumbs.

SIT OR STAND UP STRAIGHT
Correct posture is important because the nerves that operate your fingers start in neck. During activities which require you to be looking down at what you are doing, like chopping vegetables, take a moment to stand up straight, turn your head side to side/up and down, and stretch your arms over your head.

SLIDE, DO NOT LIFT
When working in the oven, always slide the shelf out so you can get a good, safe grasp of the panhandles.

KEEP YOUR SHOULDERS DOWN
Your arms should be at your sides and the counters you work on should be waist high. Many kitchen counters are too high for the average person. As a result, you may be forced to raise the shoulder you are using to cut the food and lean to the opposite side of your body when preparing food. This causes increased stress on the neck, shoulder and arm muscles and nerves.