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Chronic Disease Relief

Exercise for Chronic Disease Relief

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For people in need of chronic disease relief, exercise can decrease discomfort, improve daily functioning, and enhance overall quality of life. There are many activity choices. Overall, find something that you enjoy doing and a place that is comfortable for you to do it in. Although being physically active is good for anyone, some exercises provide specific benefits. Here is how different types of exercise can help people with specific chronic diseases.

CHRONIC DISEASE RELIEF : TYPES OF EXERCISE
There are 3 basic categories of exercise:

Aerobic Exercise
These are exercises that raise your heart rate through repetitive movement of large muscles groups. The 2 types of aerobic exercise are:

  • Weightbearing exercise —Your muscles work against the force of gravity. Examples include jogging, walking, and dancing.
  • Non-weightbearing exercise —The force of gravity does not play a major role. Examples include biking, swimming, and rowing.

Strength Training Exercise
These are exercises that increase the power, tone, and efficiency of individual muscles by contracting isolated muscles against resistance. An example is lifting weights. The increase in heart rate is short-lived compared to aerobic exercise.

Stretching

These are exercises that improve or maintain the flexibility of your muscles. Good flexibility is important to keeping a full range of motion and decreasing your chances of injury. Ideally, you should stretch after each exercise session.

DISEASE IMPACT
Overall, all 3 types of exercises are important in a chronic disease relief program. However, the list below demonstrates how a certain types of exercise can directly impact your specific health condition.

Heart Disease
Researchers and healthcare professionals have found that regular exercise reduces the risk of having a heart attack, particularly for people with coronary artery disease (CAD).

Specific benefits of exercise for people with heart disease include:

  • Stronger heart muscle
  • Reduced cholesterol
  • Reduced plaque build-up inside the arteries
  • Better weight and blood pressure control

Type of exercise that can reduce risk of heart disease and heart attack: Aerobic

High Cholesterol
Cholesterol is found in cells throughout your body. Although it tends to get a bad rap, cholesterol is actually essential for life. It only contributes to heart disease when you have too much of certain types of cholesterol or too little of other types.

Exercise can help reduce cholesterol, and even better, it can help raise your HDL (good) cholesterol. Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Even short, 10-minute spurts of exercise can help. Exercise also has the added benefit of weight loss, which can also help to lower cholesterol levels.

Type of exercise that has been shown to improve cholesterol levels: Aerobic

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of the body’s insulin production and usage, and it is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. If there is not enough insulin, glucose (fuel for all cells) cannot get from the blood to the cells. As a result, the body is essentially starved and the glucose builds up in the blood. Exercise can make the cells more sensitive to insulin, and more glucose can move from the blood into cells.

Since exercise changes the way your body reacts to insulin, you may need to check your blood sugar before and after exercising. Talk to your doctor before you begin an exercise program to learn about what your levels should be.

Types of exercise that influence insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk factors: Aerobic and strength training

High Blood Pressure
The risk of high blood pressure increases as we age. Exercise can help to lower your risk and even control your blood pressure if it’s already high. Exercise helps with blood pressure by making your heart work more efficiently. This means your heart does not have to work as hard to pump blood, so there is less pressure on your arteries.

A good target for blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. Adding moderate physical activities to your normal routines can help you get there. You should aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity on most days of the week. Even several 10-minute spurts throughout the day can help.

Types of exercise that have been shown to lower blood pressure: Aerobic and strength training

Stroke
A stroke occurs when not enough blood is reaching part of the brain. This causes the cells in that area to die. People who have already had a stroke are at increased risk for recurrent stroke or other cardiovascular problems.

A stroke can create some physical impairments. Exercise may improve strength and coordination of the affected muscles. Exercise recommendations may vary depending on the severity of the stroke and the person’s limitations.

Type of exercise for stroke recovery: Aerobic, strength training, and stretching

Cancer
Studies suggest that people with cancer who do not have depression have a better chance of survival than those who do. Exercise is a great way to avoid depression and improve your overall mood. It’s not clear exactly how exercise impacts mood, but it probably works by causing the brain to release chemicals, like endorphins, and increase body temperature, which can have a calming effect.

Types of exercise found to boost energy and mood: Aerobic and strength training

Lung Disease
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is the most common form of lung disease in adults. Exercise improves activity levels and decreases symptoms.

Types of exercise shown to improve respiratory ability: Aerobic

Arthritis

Continuous motion is essential for the health of your joints, especially arthritic ones. Regular exercise promotes strength and flexibility, and helps preserve the resiliency of joint surfaces.

Types of exercise shown to improve joint health: Nonweightbearing aerobic, strength training, and stretching (water exercises are ideal)

Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis is a bone-thinning disease that can lead to fractures. Weightbearing exercises maintain bone density and strength by tipping the balance in favor of bone formation. Weightbearing activities include walking, jogging, hiking, dancing, stair climbing, tennis, and other activities that you do while on your feet.

Type of exercise shown to improve bone density: Weightbearing aerobic and strength training

In any condition, a well-rounded exercise program will have all 3 types of exercise involved. Aerobic exercise will increase your endurance and ability to get through longer workouts. Strength training will build muscle strength and allow you to tolerate higher intensities as well improve balance and agility. Stretching can decrease stiffness and increase mobility.

Talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program. You can also consult with an exercise specialist to help you develop a routine.

by Carrie Myers Smith, BS

RESOURCES:
National Institutes of Health
http://www.nih.gov

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
http://www.aossm.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology
http://www.csep.ca

Healthy Canadians
http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca

REFERENCES:
Depression. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated February 11, 2016. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Exercises for arthritis. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/exercise/. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Fagard RH. Exercise characteristics and the blood pressure response to dynamic physical training. Med Sci Sports Exerc 33. S484-S492; 2001.

Gordon NF, Gulanick M, Costa F, Fletcher G, Franklin BA, Roth EJ, Shephard T. AHA scientific statement: Physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors. Circulation. 2004;109: 2031-2041. Circulation website. Available at: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/109/16/2031.full. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Junnila JL, Runkle GP. Coronary artery disease screening, treatment, and follow-up. Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice. 2006 Dec; 33(4).

Onitilo AA, Nietert PJ, Egede LE. Effect of depression on all-cause mortality in adults with cancer and differential effects by cancer site. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2006 Sep; 28(5): 396-402.

Physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated December 21, 2015. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Physical activity guidelines for Americans. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated January 9, 2013. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Weightbearing exercise for women and girls. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Ortho Info website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00263. Updated October 2007. Accessed March 23, 2016.

Last reviewed March 2016 by Michael Woods, MD Last Updated: 5/8/2014

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

heart healthy physical activity

Heart Healthy Physical Activity

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The heart is often used as a symbol of vitality for good reasons. The heart pushes blood and oxygen to every cell in the body to be used as fuel and carries waste away. Without this process, the body cannot function. The heart plays a role in many aspects of your health and wellness.

Efficiency Matters
The heart beats an average of 60-80 beats per minute, which can add up to millions of beats in just one month. When something works this hard, it is important that it also works efficiently. Well-conditioned athletes can have resting heart rates below 50 beats/minute. Even though their heart beats slower, it can do the same amount of work or more than a heart that beats 60-80 beats/minute. An athlete’s heart pumps stronger during each beat, needing fewer beats to get the job done. Over a lifetime, a difference of 10-30 beats/minute can add up to quite a few beats.

An Ounce of Prevention…
The heart can be affected by physical and mental stressors. You can feel your heart speed up when you sprint across a busy road or when you have a burst of emotion like anger or surprise.

Physical activity can decrease the effect of stress on the heart and body. A fit body and mind will help improve heart health. Regular physical activity can:

Improve physical abilities by:
• Improving the heart’s ability to pump blood
• Increasing energy levels
• Increasing muscle strength and endurance
• Improving agility

Change physical appearance by:
• Toning your muscles which gives you a tighter appearance
• Burning calories which helps with weight loss or maintenance

Improve overall wellness by:
• Helping with stress management
• Improving self-image
• Helping to decrease anxiety and depression
• Improving relaxation
Improving the ability to sleep
• Creating a social activity opportunity
• Promoting healthier cholesterol levels

If you have heart problems, physical activity can still play an important role. A strong and healthy body can help you manage your condition. Physical activity can help reduce the stress on a sick or weak heart and decrease secondary risks like obesity and diabetes. If you do have heart health issues, talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Even if you are healthy, but have not exercised in a long time, you may need to talk to your doctor to make sure that you are in good physical condition to exercise.

heart veggies

Where to Start
For most people, you can begin right away. Find an activity program that you enjoy. Do not pick an activity that does not fit into your schedule, does not fit in with your personal preferences, or has too many obstacles, because you may lose interest quickly. A program that starts with too much intensity is also likely to lose your interest.

Work towards reaching these basic goals:
• 30-60 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week (total of at least 150 minutes/week)
• Include some strength activities at least 2 times/week

Make It Stick
Long-term regular physical activity will count more than a brief and spectacular burst of activity. Most people do not plan to become sedentary. It creeps up on you. Work to increase your physical activity the same way. Gradually add steps. Find activities you enjoy that can replace more sedentary activities.

Here are more tips that have been shown to be useful:
• Find an exercise partner. You are less likely to skip the activity if someone is waiting for you.
• Write it down or use a fitness tracker. Keep a log of your activities and how much you accomplished either by distance or time. It will help keep you honest.
• A long-term goal is fine, but also make short-term goals, because they provide quicker feedback.
• This is important, make it a priority. Plan it out. Find a time in your daily routine when you can regularly fit the activity in.
• Consider doing your activity in 10-minute spurts throughout the day. Spurts can be as effective as being active for 30 minutes straight.
• Be flexible. Life happens and you may find that you need to make adjustments to your routine. A rigid schedule and goal may not be worth the stress. Keep an open mind to new activities and schedules.

Make It Count
Any physical activity is better than none. But at least a few days per week you should aim for more than a leisurely stroll. A moderate intensity level is best to help you make health changes. Moderate intensity activity is enough to get your heart rate up and make you feel a little out of breath but not feel worn out when you are done.

Do not forget to enjoy your activity for the daily benefits it can bring and know that your heart appreciates it as well!

by Pamela Jones, MA

RESOURCES:
American College of Sports Medicine
http://www.acsm.org

American Heart Association
http://www.heart.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca

REFERENCES:
American Heart Association guidelines for physical activity. American Heart Association website. Available: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/StartWalking/American-Heart-Association-Guidelines-for-Physical-Activity_UCM_307976_Article.jsp. Updated September 10, 2014. Accessed October 22, 2014.

Guide to physical activity. National Heart and Lung and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/phy_act.htm. Accessed July 21, 2016.

Haskel W, et al. Physical activity and public health, updated recommendations for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association. Circ. 2007;116(9):1081.

How much physical activity do you need? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/index.html. Updated June 4, 2016. Accessed July 21, 2016.

Promoting physical activity with a public health approach. American College of Sports Medicine website. Available at: http://www.acsm.org/about-acsm/media-room/acsm-in-the-news/2011/08/01/promoting-physical-activity-with-a-public-health-approach. Accessed July 21, 2016.

2008 physical activity guidelines for Americans. United States Department of Health and Human Services website. Available at: http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/default.aspx. Accessed July 21, 2016.

Last reviewed July 2016 by Michael Woods, MD Last Updated:10/22/2014

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

October 2016 Events

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Check out our Physical Therapy Monthly Events Calendar! Focusing on events from PTandMe.com participating physical and occupational therapy clinics. Read more to find out what’s happening in your community in October 2016!

GEORGIA PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

FOLKSTON, GA
DATE: October 21st 2016, 5:00PM – 7:00PM
20 Year Anniversary Cookout
CLINIC: Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy – Folkston
Advance Rehab is celebrating its 20 year anniversary in Folkston, Georgia with a cookout and live music by local artist Justen Harden
For more information about Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, visit them online at http://www.advancerehab.com.

IDAHO PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

BOISE, ID
DATE: October 18th – 15th 2016
2016 NPI Annual Fall Conference
CLINIC: Intermountain Physical Therapy & Hand Rehabilitation – Boise
Intermountain will have a booth at this year’s event. Stop on by and see how physical therapy brings patients back to their full potential! For more information about Intermountain Physical Therapy & Hand Rehabilitation, visit them online at http://www.intermountainpt.com.

MICHIGAN PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

MONROE, MI
DATE: October 4th 2016, 3:00PM – 6:00PM
Monroe Open House
CLINIC: Advanced Physical Therapy – Monroe
Advanced Physical Therapy’s Monroe clinic is celebrating their relocation with an open house! Join us for snacks, drinks and check out the new digs. We’d love to have you as we get to know our new neighbors and friends! First 100 guests will receive a free gift. For more information about Advanced Physical Therapy, visit them online at http://advphysicaltherapy.com.

NEW JERSEY PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

BORDENTOWN, NJ
DATE: October 17th 2016, 4:30PM – 8:00PM
Work Comp Seminar at Villa Mannino Restaurant
CLINIC: Hamilton Physical Therapy Services, L.P.
Attention all work comp case managers and adjusters! Join Hamilton Physical Therapy and Princeton Brain & Spine Care as they talk about the Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Concussions in the injured workers.

AGENDA:
4:30 pm – 5:30 pm — Registration & Vendor Exhibit
5:30 pm – 5:45 pm — Opening Remarks
5:45 pm – 7:30 pm — Clinical Presentation
7:30 pm – 8:00 pm — Q&A Session

For more information contact Jaime Caceres at Hamilton Physical Therapy Services in Hamilton, New Jersey at (609) 585-2333. Also, visit Hamilton Physical Therapy Services online at http://www.hamiltonphysicaltherapy.org.

TENNESSEE PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

NASHVILLE, TN
DATE: October 15th 2016, 8:00AM – 11:00PM
2016 – 2017 Heart Walk at Vanderbilt University Sport Field
CLINIC: STAR Physical Therapy
Help STAR Physical Therapy reach their goal to raise $5,000 for the American Heart Association. You can help us by donating to our team ($20 donations receive a custom t-shirt) or join the STAR Physical Therapy Heart Walk Team and join us at the event! For more information about STAR Physical Therapy, visit them online at http://www.starpt.com.

TEXAS PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

CLEVELAND, TX
DATE: October 15th 2016, 9:00AM
Walk with a Doc for Hardhats & Little Heads
CLINIC: Cleveland Physical & Occupational Therapy
Cleveland Physical & Occupational Therapy is participating in this year’s Walk With A Doc at the Cleveland High School Track! Bring your friends and family to enjoy a day of fun! Participants will walk on the track with national award winning doctor Dr. Sulaiman, explore vendor booths, receive health and community information as well as meet local fireman and police officers all while getting healthy! Special appearances by Reggie Airman Dixon, Maurice Termite Watkins, and Reggie Johnson. Children will be provided with free bikes, helmets, t-shirts, water bottles, goodie bags and more as part of the Hard Helmets for Little Heads initiative while supplies last. All materials will be distributed on a first come, first served basis. For more information, please contact Kimberly Hughes at (281) 592.2224 – ext. 206 or at khughes@hcset.com. You can also visit the official event website here: http://walkwithadoc.org/our-locations/cleveland-texas/. For more information about Cleveland Physical & Occupational Therapy, visit them online at http://www.clevelandpt.com.

WISCONSIN PHYSICAL THERAPY EVENTS

JEFFERSON, WI
DATE: October 10th 2016, 5:30PM – 6:30PM
JUMP: Great Apple Crunch Fun Run
CLINIC: Sport & Spine Physical Therapy – Jefferson
Sport & Spine Physical Therapy in Jefferson, Wisconsin invites Jefferson community members of all ages to join us in our 4th annual one mile FUN RUN/WALK! Participation ribbons for all children
There will also be refreshments. In the event of inclement weather, it will be canceled with no make-up date. For more information contact Jo Christianson at christiansonj@tds.net.
Also, please visit Sport & Spine Physical Therapy online at http://sportandspineclinic.com.

MERRILL, WI
DATE: October 8th 2016, 8:00AM – 1:00PM
2016 Leaf Pile Run 6th Annual 5k Run/Walk & 1k Kids Run
CLINICS: Sport & Spine Physical Therapy & Merrill Physical Therapy
Please join Sport & Spine Physical Therapy, Merrill Physical Therapy and other WVAM members for a fun and festive fall run, to help support Wisconsin Valley Athletic Medicine by participating in the 2016 Leaf Pile Annual Event. All 5k and 1k participants receive a complimentary wristband for same day entry to Helene’s Hilltop Orchard to enjoy a hayride, corn maze, cow train, and the play area. Complimentary beverages from Red Eye Brewing Co. and root beer from Central Beer Distributors. Need more info? Contact Andy at Sport & Spine Clinic at adavis@usphclinic.com or call (715) 693-7727. For more information about Merrill Physical Therapy, visit them online at http://www.merrillpt.com.