Tag Archives: Common Baseball Injuries

prevent throwing injuries

Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries

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In this monthly series about how to prevent throwing injuries, we examine the proper ways to exercise and prevent throwing injuries in baseball. If you have any sudden significant increase in pain, swelling, or discoloration while performing or following exercise, discontinue immediately and contact your primary care provider.


PRONE ROW
Lay on your stomach with your arm hanging off the edge toward the ground. Squeeze your shoulder blade and bring your elbow toward the ceiling while keeping your forearm perpendicular to the ground.


PRONE ROW WITH EXTERNAL ROTATION
Lay on your stomach with your arm hanging off the edge toward the ground. Turn your wrist so your palm is toward your feet. Squeeze your shoulder blade and bring your elbow toward the ceiling while keeping your forearm perpendicular to the ground. Once your arm is parallel with the ground rotate the back of your hand toward the ceiling while keeping the elbow bent.


PRONE T (HORIZONTAL ABDUCTION)
Lay on your stomach with your arm hanging off the edge toward the ground. Lift your arm straight out to your side and squeeze your shoulder blade with the palm continuing to face toward the ground.


PRONE Y (SCAPTION)
Lay on your stomach with your arm hanging off the edge toward the ground. Lift your arm at a 45 degree angle over your head with your thumb facing toward the ceiling. Squeeze your shoulder blade down and toward your spine.

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 24 locations in Georgia and Florida. Advance Rehabilitation is a physical therapy practice that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. They specialize in physical therapy, sports medicine, industrial rehabilitation and athletic training. Their staff includes highly-trained professionals that serve as a bridge between injury and recovery to help patients get back to pre-injury status as quickly as possible. For more information click here.

See the entire Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries series here:

   Prevent Throwing Injuries

   prevent throwing injuries

throwing injuries PTandMe

Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries

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In this third intallment of our series to prevent throwing injuries, we examine the proper ways to exercise and prevent throwing injuries in baseball. If you have any sudden significant increase in pain, swelling, or discoloration while performing or following exercise, discontinue immediately and contact your primary care provider.


INTERNAL ROTATION WITH SHOULDER AT 90 DEGREES OF ABDUCTION
Attach band high up on a doorway and face away from door. Hold band and move your arm out sideways away from your body until your arm is parallel with the ground. Bend your elbow to 90 degrees and point your fist toward the ceiling. Rotate from your shoulder bringing your hand forward while keeping your arm parallel to the floor and your elbow bent to 90 degrees.


EXTERNAL ROTATION WITH SHOULDER AT 90 DEGREES OF ABDUCTION
Attach band high on a doorway and face toward the door. Hold band and move your arm out sideways away from your body until your arm is parallel with the ground. Bend your elbow to 90 degrees and point your fist toward the door. Rotate from your shoulder bringing your hand away from the door while keeping your arm parallel to the floor and your elbow bent to 90 degrees.


SHOULDER INTERNAL ROTATION AT SIDE
Attach band to the doorway at chest height. Stand perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you are exercising closest to the door. Keep your arm at your side with a towel roll under the arm and bend the elbow to 90 degrees. Bring your hand toward your stomach while keeping the elbow bent to 90 degrees.


SHOULDER EXTERNAL ROTATION AT SIDE
Attach band to the doorway at chest height. Stand perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you are exercising furthest from the door. Keep your arm at your side with a towel roll under the arm and bend the elbow to 90 degrees. Bring your hand away from your stomach while keeping the elbow bent to 90 degrees.

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 24 locations in Georgia and Florida. Advance Rehabilitation is a physical therapy practice that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. We specialize in physical therapy, sports medicine, industrial rehabilitation and athletic training. Our staff includes highly-trained professionals that serve as a bridge between injury and recovery to help patients get back to pre-injury status as quickly as possible. For more information click here.

See the entire Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries series here:

   Prevent Throwing Injuries

   prevent throwing injuries

throwing injuries PTandMe

Prevent Throwing Injuries

Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries

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In our second installment of “Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries” we examine the proper ways to exercise and prevent throwing injuries in baseball. If you have any sudden significant increase in pain, swelling, or discoloration while performing or following exercise, discontinue immediately and contact your primary care provider.


SHOULDER ABDUCTION
Begin with your arms at your side with your palms facing forward. Raise your arm straight out to the side until they are straight overhead.


SHOULDER SCAPTION
Begin with your arms at your side. Raise your arms at a 45 degree angle creating a V shape with your arms until they are overhead.


D2 EXTENSION
Secure band to wall or top of the doorway. Pull diagonally down across your body toward your opposite hip. Make sure to keep the elbow straight. Return to the starting position with a straight elbow and repeat.


D2 FLEXION
Secure band to bottom of the doorway. Pull diagonally up across your body away from your body. Make sure to keep the elbow straight. Return to the starting position with a straight elbow and repeat.

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 24 locations in Georgia and Florida. Advance Rehabilitation is a physical therapy practice that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. We specialize in physical therapy, sports medicine, industrial rehabilitation and athletic training. Our staff includes highly-trained professionals that serve as a bridge between injury and recovery to help patients get back to pre-injury status as quickly as possible. For more information click here.

See the entire Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries series here:

   Prevent Throwing Injuries

   prevent throwing injuries

throwing injuries PTandMe

 

Throwing Injuries

Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries

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In this monthly series, we examine the proper ways to exercise and prevent throwing injuries in baseball. If you have any sudden significant increase in pain, swelling, or discoloration while performing or following exercise, discontinue immediately and contact your primary care provider.


PUSH UPS
Start on your stomach with your hands below your shoulders. Maintain a straight line from your ankles, through your hips, to the shoulders. Extend your elbows pushing your stomach away from the floor.


BICEP CURL
Begin seated with your elbow extended and palm facing forward. Bend the elbow as far up as you can without flexing your shoulder or rotating your wrist.


TRICEP DIP
Find two even surfaces to support your upper body with your elbows bent (a chair with arm rests works well). Extend your elbows pushing your body up toward the ceiling. Lower slowly.


OVERHEAD TRICEP EXTENSION
With your shoulder in full flexion overhead, hold a weight in your hand with your elbow bent behind your head. Straighten your elbow toward the ceiling without changing the angle of your shoulder.

This information was written by Advance Rehabilitation Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with 24 locations in Georgia and Florida. Advance Rehabilitation is a physical therapy practice that focuses on providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. We specialize in physical therapy, sports medicine, industrial rehabilitation and athletic training. Our staff includes highly-trained professionals that serve as a bridge between injury and recovery to help patients get back to pre-injury status as quickly as possible. For more information click here.

See the entire Guidelines to Prevent Throwing Injuries series here:

   Prevent Throwing Injuries

   prevent throwing injuries

throwing injuries PTandMe

causes of pitching arm injuries

The Most Common Causes of Pitching Arm Injuries

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The most common causes of pitching arm injuries to high school, college and professional pitchers are overload, overuse, lack of proper conditioning and improper throwing mechanics.

• Overload is the result of throwing too many pitches during one outing. Maximum pitch counts for various age groups, or for an individual pitcher’s normal strength and stamina, are effective in preventing overload.

• Overuse is the result of pitching too often and not having an adequate recovery time or a good arm maintenance program (stretching, running, strengthening, throwing) between pitching assignments. Coaches and trainers should be aware that each individual pitcher varies in arm strength, arm fatigue, arm tightness and soreness and require different recovery time needs. Make certain you provide your pitcher with a good active recovery program between pitching assignments.

• Proper conditioning involves the entire body; the legs and core muscles as well as the throwing arm. Coaches should supervise a proper stretching and warm-up procedure that is performed daily before throwing a ball.

• Pre-season is one of the most frequent times for arm injuries. Pitchers throw too much and too hard, too early. Also, they have not ingrained their normal rhythm and often are attempting to learn new techniques or new pitches. Another major factor of injury during pre-season is that pitchers are not working with a normal in-season rotation schedule and do not get enough recovery time from a lot of necessary drill work that involves throwing (pick-offs, defensive plays, etc.).

• Improper throwing mechanics. If a pitcher has improper throwing techniques, with the body or arm, there is a great chance of early fatigue of the throwing mechanism, and of course injury. The more power and force generated, the greater the chance of injury. In a competitive situation, most pitchers will not admit they are fatigued, experiencing minor pain or have a minor injury. It is important that you, a coach, trainer or physical therapist be able to recognize changes in the pitcher’s mechanics, performance, or mannerisms.

night pitcher

This information about common causes of pitching arm injuries was written by University Physical Therapy, an outpatient physical therapy group with eight locations in New River Valley, Virginia. University PT is THE choice for outstanding sports rehabilitation, physical therapy and occupational therapy services. For more information click here.