Tag Archives: walking

Lower Limb Amputations

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The goal for every patient with a lower limb amputation is to walk normally again.
A patient with a lower limb amputation faces many challenges when it comes to walking safely in a variety of walking surfaces and without exerting excessive energy. Continue reading

Exercise and Bone Health

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Bone is living tissue that is constantly undergoing a process called remodeling. In remodeling, cells called osteoclasts are breaking down old bone, as cells called osteoblasts are replacing it with new tissue. Many factors can affect the remodeling process and leave you with bones that are less dense and more fragile. Continue reading

True or False: A Person With a Serious Head Injury or Concussion Should Be Kept Awake

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All head injuries should be treated seriously. While most won’t cause lasting effects, if improperly treated, they can lead to long-term disabilities or even death. Continue reading

Self-Care: Safe Positions & Movement After Knee Surgery

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ACTIVITY GUIDELINES
Recovering from surgery does not have to prevent you from moving or taking care of yourself. Listed below are guidelines on how to do some common movements and activities without hindering the healing process. Continue reading

PT News

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This Month in PT News. Featuring articles from PTandMe partnering clinics.
 
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1.Degenerative Disc Disease and the Role of Physical Therapy
Written by the therapy Team at The Jackson Clinics Physical Therapy

The symptoms of degenerative disc disease are varied but regardless, it can limit the patient’s mobility and ability to perform daily activities. Painkillers can help patients with degenerative disc disease but they also benefit from physical therapy. Let’s take a look on the role of Oregon Spine & Physical Therapy in Eugene, Oregon in managing degenerative disc disease. Read More

 

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2. Early Signs of Dehydration

Written by the therapy team at ARCH Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine

You have commonly heard the phrase, “MAKE SURE YOU ARE DRINKING ENOUGH WATER.” Hydration is important for the body not only as a daily practice, during physical activity, but also plays an important role in the aid of weight loss. The human body is made up of approximately 50-75% water. The percentage of water varies based on age and gender. Read More

 

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3. You Win Some, You Lose Some- Lessons Learned as a Marathon Walker
Written by Tiffany Basore PT, DPT at The Center for Physical Rehabilitation

Growing up I was an athlete. While being a perfectionist and competitive by nature helped me reach some goals, it has also held me back. There were times in my life where I avoided things because I was afraid to fail. In 2009, I took a chance and trained for a ½ marathon. Despite playing multiple sports, long distance running has never been “my thing”. I was nervous to participate for fear of failure, but I put these thoughts aside and I trained. I followed a plan, I was consistent, and I didn’t get hurt. When race day rolled around I was nervous but I felt I had prepared well. I had been experiencing some mild health issues at the time which had altered my diet, but I didn’t worry too much about it. I woke up the morning of the race with my legs feeling like lead. I attributed this to being nervous and over-thinking things. I started the race hoping I just needed to get into my rhythm, but I never did. I trudged on for 12 of the 13.1 miles willing my non-cooperative body to keep moving. Just past mile 12, there was a hill. I knew there was no way my body would carry me to the finish line if I tried to run up it. My entire body was letting me down in a way it never had during any of my training runs. As I began to walk, a medic asked if I was okay. I stubbornly said yes, but when asked to walk a straight line, I couldn’t come close. He checked my blood pressure, oxygen, and blood sugar, all of which were too low. I had to stop. My body had failed me. I had failed. Read More